z_o_e
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Can someone help me on how to analyse this quote Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1494688515.233924.jpg
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student1606
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It could link to Scrooge being an outsider in society, and the 'solitary' reflects the description of him in "present day", where it says 'solitary as an oyster'. I don't really know...
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z_o_e
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(Original post by student1606)
It could link to Scrooge being an outsider in society, and the 'solitary' reflects the description of him in "present day", where it says 'solitary as an oyster'. I don't really know...
Hiya
Do you have any quotes for Fred?


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CandidateZero
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(Original post by z_o_e)
Hiya
Do you have any quotes for Fred?


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Off the top of my head (apologies for inaccuracies):

Fred's "ruddy" and "handsome" appearance juxtaposes Dickens' hyperbolic description of Scrooge: that he is a "covetous old sinner", has a "tight-fisted hand at the grindstone" and is encapsulated in his own "solitary" belief of Christmas.

Not only does Fred embody the Christmas spirit, he also challenges some of Scrooge's deeper prejudices. He claims to Scrooge that he married "because I fell in love", which we know to be an emotion lost on present-day Scrooge. Fred's resilience to Scrooge's rebuke against poverty is demonstrated when he demands to Scrooge, "what right have you to be morose? You're rich enough."

Fred has not "benefited" from embracing the Christmas spirit, but does so to be wealthy in family terms and happiness. This is in stark contrast to Scrooge, who has experienced resentment from "beggars" that would not "bestow a trifle" and may derive his discontentment from his childhood "condescension".

There is a scene which displays Fred's family happy at Christmas, offered up to Scrooge's witness by the Ghost of Christmas Present. Fred's "contagious" laughter is indicative of the happiness that family life, the Christmas spirit and normal living can bring to a man: Scrooge possibly learns from Fred that money is not a necessity to happiness. Fred comments that Scrooge is not as "bad" as everyone may consider him to be, which offers Scrooge an opportunity to reconcile his distance to his only family, his nephew.

At the end of the novella, Fred is witness to a metamorphosis of Scrooge and his newly reformed attitude towards the Christmas spirit. Fred exclaims, "bless my soul" and satirises Scrooge's transformation, saying, don't pull his "arm off!" It is only right that Fred experiences the Scrooge that is now "as light as a feather", "quite a baby" and "illustrious", as he was such a monumental influence to his change: Scrooge clearly recognises this also.
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