Multi-Party politics is dead!

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Rakas21
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#1
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Evening.

After the last overwhelming victory in 2001 the UK saw a period where both the Labour and Conservative parties struggled to achieve vote shares that would in the historical context be considered pitiful. In 2005 the Labour party won with 35% of the vote to the Lib Dem's 22%, in 2010 we saw a similar picture and by 2013 with the rise of Ukip the two main parties in the local elections could not muster 60% of the vote.

Although we are still some weeks from the general election the common theme in polling now is that the Con-Lab vote is going to be in the 75-80% range with the Lib Dem's and Kippers barely managing double digits. The highest combined total since 1979.

So after facing a period in which both the left and right were being flanked, it now seems as if multi party politics is dead as Con-Lab reign supreme.
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username878267
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Evening.

After the last overwhelming victory in 2001 the UK saw a period where both the Labour and Conservative parties struggled to achieve vote shares that would in the historical context be considered pitiful. In 2005 the Labour party won with 35% of the vote to the Lib Dem's 22%, in 2010 we saw a similar picture and by 2013 with the rise of Ukip the two main parties in the local elections could not muster 60% of the vote.

Although we are still some weeks from the general election the common theme in polling now is that the Con-Lab vote is going to be in the 75-80% range with the Lib Dem's and Kippers barely managing double digits. The highest combined total since 1979.

So after facing a period in which both the left and right were being flanked, it now seems as if multi party politics is dead as Con-Lab reign supreme.
Just need the SNP to fade.

Long term this helps Labour as the multi party system has split the left more than the right.
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RF_PineMarten
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Far too early to say that. The circumstances around this election are unlike anything we've seen in a while. UKIP have been hit hard by the fact that their main issue has been taken away from them, while for the first time in ages we actually have two main parties that are significantly different from each other (so UKIP votes go to the Conservatives, while left wing people might now be voting Labour rather than Lib Dem or Green). Oh, and there's the whole "May deliberately calling a snap election because her party is polling high" thing, which the fixed term parliaments act was supposed to put a stop to. That's before we even get to Scotland.

The situation could very easily be different in 5 years time, depending on parties changing leaders and/or direction.
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username2808800
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Hmmm , true. Could change though.
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username878267
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Still wish we could have PR so we could have parties that stood for something rather than being catch all tents.

There is no way that Corbyn and Blair should be in the same party. Similarly there is no way that Dan Hannan and Theresa May should be in the same party.

Would love it if we had PR and then the Tories and Labour parties could split.
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