A-Level History Protest, Agitation and Parliamentary Reform in Brtain 1980 - 1928 Watch

Lauraisobels
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Sorry, I meant to put 1780 instead of 1980 in the title.


Is anyone doing this topic for unit 3 a-level edexcel history?

If so, have you found any good revision resources?

I am distance learning and the course material I've been given from edexcel is not in depth enough to achieve a high grade. I've bought the accompanying text book, however, it is beyond confusing and trying to comprehend and organise the information into something that I understand is sucking up vast amounts of time.

Thanks
0
reply
WhitneyHouston
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
Hey yeah I'm doing this as well - I'm stressing so much its so hard, how is your revision going? would you say that you know all 8 topics in depth now?
0
reply
ChloeJaneSmith
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
this topic is the worst
0
reply
tobqq
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
History is the worst
0
reply
ChloeJaneSmith
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by tobqq)
History is the worst
biggest regret
0
reply
fergus hennessy
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
Here is what we've been provided for a revision template, hope this helps xx (p.s. very long)


For the Breadth study 1790 – 1928 and for each of the 5 depth studies you will find:



  • The Exam Board specification of what you should know




  • A grid of these topics, plus a few extra. For all of these you should tick them off when:






  • a) You have checked your notes to see that they are compete – use your textbook and the internet to fill in any gaps. Use the revision grids on the VLE to check how complete your notes are. Don’t assume that you have enough material or that the topic doesn’t matter
  • b) You have learnt the material – ways to check that you really have absorbed the facts could include – creating a timeline of the whole depth study from memory; getting someone else to test you; creating questions for yourself and then answering them a few days later
  • c) You are ready to use the material in an exam eg. Consider what the issue is evidence for eg. Evidence of lack of support, different methods used, role of leadership; create a spider diagram taking a topic eg. Strength of opposition and considering all the depth studies and putting in any links between them. Can you draw up these spider diagrams from memory?




  • Questions that have been produced in the two textbooks




At the end of the 5 depth studies there are a number of different issues that could be raised as an exam question covering more than two depth studies.



This booklet is only a guide – any extra reading you can do, maybe using the VLE or a book from the library will extend your understanding and will make a significant difference to your final grade.



You cannot answer any question without an in-depth knowledge of events. Similarly, knowledge alone is not enough. During lessons we shall not be going over events as such but we shall be looking at how to address questions – such as whether they are looking at causation, consequence, change & continuity, similarity & difference or significance. We shall also consider how to use material and evaluate the evidence and how to put over a line of argument.




Breadth Section C specification and questions

Reform of Parliament:

  • changes in the franchise, c17801928: the franchise c1780 and its significance for representation of the people;


pressures for change and reasons for resistance (key developments: the Representation of the People Acts of 1832, 1867, 1884, 1918 and 1928).

  • Reform and redistribution, c1780–1928: the problems of representation c1780; the failure of Pitt’s proposals; reasons for resistance to, and key changes brought by, reform (key developments: Representation of the People Acts 1832–1928, Redistribution Act 1885, the Ballot Act 1872, the Corrupt Practices Act 1883); the extent of change by 1928.






Changing influences in Parliament: the impact of Parliamentary reform

● The influence of the crown and aristocracy, c1780–1928: the extent of crown and aristocratic influence on elections and in parliament c1780; the reasons for declining influence over the House of Commons (key developments: ‘economical reform’ in the 1780s, the Parliament Act 1911).

● Changes in political parties, c1780–1928: their role in parliament and in elections; party organisation and membership; the growth of the Labour Party. The extent of change in the social makeup of the House of Commons by 1928 (key developments: abolition of property qualification 1858, payment of MPs 1911).




Topic/ Issue

Notes complete?

Revision?

Exam ready?

Failure of Pitt’s proposals







1832 Reform Act









1858 Abolition of MPs property qual







1867 Reform Act









1872 Ballot Act









1883 Corrupt & Illegal Practices Act







1884-5 Reform Act









1911 Parliament Act









1918 Representation of the People Act







1928 Representation of the People Act







Influence of Crown on elections & in Parliament







Influence of aristocracy on elections & in Parliament







Tamworth Manifesto









Growth of Labour party







Demise of Liberal party












Hodder

To what extent was the second Representation of the People (Reform) Act 1867 the key turning point in the development of political parties in the years 1790 – 1928?

‘In the years 1815 – 1928, the reform of parliamentary representation was primarily driven by pressure, from those excluded from the franchise.’ How far do you agree with this statement?

‘The Parliament Act of 1911 led to the most significant change in the relationship between the House of Commons and the House of Lords in the years 1815 – 1928’. How far do you agree with this statement?

How far do you agree that the third Representation of the People (Reform) Act 1884 – 5 was the key turning point in the development of democracy in England in the years 1790 – 1928?



Pearson

How far do you agree that the change to the electoral system in the years 1780 – 1928 was the most important factor driving changes in the organisation and membership of the Liberal and Conservative parties in the years 1832 – 1928?

How far do you agree that the changes to the franchise in the years 1780 – 1928 were the most important reason for the declining influence of the aristocracy over the House of Commons?

‘Redistribution of seats was carried out mainly to reflect changes in Britain’s economic landscape.’ How far do you agree with this opinion on parliamentary redistribution in the years 1780 – 1918?

To what extent was the extension of the franchise the result of political rivalry in the years 1828 – 1928?

To what extent was reform of the franchise in the years 1832 – 1928 influenced by extra-parliamentary pressure?



Miscellaneous

How far do you agree that the reform of Parliament in the years 1830 to 1928 was driven by the genuine commitment to reform by parliamentarians?’



How accurate is it to say that there was a continuously changing development in the relationship between the House of Commons and the House of Lords in the years 1815 – 1928?

‘The 1832 Reform Act marked the most important turning point in the declining royal influence over the House of Commons.’ How far do you agree with this assessment?

How far do you agree that the payment of MPs in 1911 brought about the most important change in the social composition of the House of Commons in the period c1780 – 1928?

How far do you agree that the abolition of the property qualification for MPs in 1858 brought about the most important change in the social composition of the House of Commons in the period c1780 – 1928?





Depth Section B Specification and Questions



Radical Reformers



  • Aims, tactics and impact of extra-parliamentary protest: the London Corresponding Society, 1792–93, the Spa Fields meetings, 1816, the Pentridge Rising, 1817, and Peterloo, 1819; extent of success by 1819.


Government responses: the trial of the leaders of the London Corresponding Society and suspension of Habeas Corpus, 1794, the Treason Act and Seditious Meetings Act 1795, the Gagging Acts 1817 and the Six Acts 1819.

  • The influence of Tom Paine and the Rights of Man, John Cartwright and the Hampden Clubs, William Cobbett and the Political Register; the role of Henry Hunt as a radical orator.





Topic/ Issue

Notes complete?

Revision?

Exam ready?

LCS 1792 - 93









Spa Fields 1816









Pentridge Rising 1817







Peterloo









Extent of support by 1819







Trial of leaders of LCS







Suspension of Habaeus Corpus1794







Treason Act 1795









Seditious Meetings Act 1795







Gagging Acts 1817









Six Acts 1819









Paine & Rights of Man







Cartwright & Hampden Clubs







Cobbett & Political Register







Henry Hunt












Hodder

How great a threat did radical reformers pose to the government from 1790 to 1819?



How effective was the government in dealing with the threat of radical reformers from 1790 to 1819?



To what extent was poverty the cause of popular radicalism from 1790 to 1819?



‘The lack of widespread popular support was the main reason for the failure of radical reformers to achieve parliamentary reform in the years 1790 to 1819.’ How far do you agree with this statement?



Pearson

How far do you agree that, in the years 1790 – 1819, radical protests posed no serious threat to the government?



‘In the years 1790 – 1819, British radicalism failed to achieve its objectives because the power of the state was too strong.’ How far do you agree with this statement?



Miscellaneous

‘In the years 1790 – 1819, British Radicalism failed to achieve its objectives because of opposition from the middle classes.’ How far do you agree with this statement?









Chartism



  • Chartism’s aims and actions; importance of the National Convention, 1839, the Newport Rising, 1839, the Petitions (1839, 1842, 1848) and the Kennington Common rally, 1848; the roles of Lovett and O’Connor; reasons why Chartism failed to achieve its aims by 1850.


Fluctuations in support among different sections of society, and reasons for this.

  • Government responses; the significance of Major General Napier; the impact of the growth of a rail network.





Topic/ Issue

Notes complete?

Revision?

Exam ready?

Aims









National Convention 1839







Newport Rising 19839







Petitions: 1839, 1842, 1848







Kennington Common rally 1848







Lovett









O’Connor









Support base









Government response







General Napier









Use of Railways & Telegraph










Hodder

‘The passing of the new Poor Law in 1834 was the main reason why Chartism attracted mass support in the years from 1837 to 1841.’ How far do you agree with this statement?



To what extent do you agree with the view that Chartism was primarily the product of economic depression in the years from 1837 to 1848?



‘Inept leadership characterised the leadership of both the radical reformers from 1790 to 1819 and of the Chartists from 1837 to 1848.’ To what extent do you agree with this statement?



‘The power of the state was always going to prevent the Chartists succeeding in their aims.’ How far do you agree with this statement?



Pearson

How far do the economic conditions explain the origins of the Chartist movement in the years 1832 – 38?



To what extent did support for Chartism change in the years 1838 – 50?



Miscellaneous

How far was Trade Unionism a factor in explaining the development of Chartism from 1838 – 1850?



How far did internal conflict inhibit Chartist success in the years 1838 – 1850?

Contagious Diseases Acts

  • Reasons why the Contagious Diseases Acts were introduced, including the committee established in 1862 to look into extent of venereal disease in the armed forces.


The Acts’ impact on prostitutes and ordinary women.

  • The roles of Josephine Butler and Elizabeth Wolstenholme and the significance of Ladies’ Association for the Repeal of the Contagious Diseases Act; reasons for the Acts’ repeal.





Topic/ Issue

Notes complete?

Revision?

Exam ready?

Introduction of CDA









1862 Committee









Impact on prostitutes







Impact on other women







Josephine Butler









Elizabeth Wolstenholme







Role of LNA









LNA: Support base









LNA: Methods used









James Stansfeld









Reasons for success
















Hodder

‘Without the leadership of Josephine Butler, the Contagious Diseases Acts would not have been repealed in 1886.’ How far do you agree with this statement?



‘The Ladies National Association played a more important role than that of any other organisation or individual in the campaign for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts in 1886.’ How far do you agree with this statement?



To what extent do you agree that a nationwide, grassroots movement was the key to the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts in 1886?



‘The contribution of James Stansfeld was more important than that of Josephine Butler in the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts in 1886.’ How far do you agree with this statement?



Pearson

How accurate is it to say that the Contagious Diseases Acts were passed primarily to protect the health of the army and navy between 1864 and 1869?



What was the impact of the Contagious Diseases Act for women between 1864 and 1870?



Miscellaneous

How accurate is it to say that the Contagious Diseases Acts were passed mainly because prostitution was seen as a necessary evil?




WSPU



  • WSPU organisation and tactics; extent of support; the reasons for, and impact of, increased militancy after 1908.


The roles of Emily Davison and Christabel, Emmeline and Sylvia Pankhurst; extent of the WSPU’s success by 1914.

Government attitudes to female suffrage and WSPU; reasons for the failure of the Women’s Suffrage bill 1909, the Conciliation Committee and the Conciliation bills 1910 and 1911, and the Government Franchise bill 1913.




Topic/ Issue

Notes complete?

Revision?

Exam ready?

Organisation









Tactics









Support base









Increased militancy post 1908







Emily Davison









Emmeline Pankhurst









Christabel Pankhurst









Sylvia Pankhurst









Success by 1914









Government attitudes







Suffrage bill 1909









Conciliation Committee







Conciliation Bills 1910; 1911; 1912







Gov Franchise bill1913










Hodder

How far do you agree that the opposition of Asquith and the Liberal Government, from 1906 to 1914, was the main reason why women were still not enfranchised by 1914?



‘Far from harming the cause of “Votes for Women”, the WSPU had, by 1914, made it into one of the most important political issues of the day.’ How far do you agree with the statement?



‘The violence espoused by the WSPU, from 1905 onwards, was the main reason for their failure to achieve the female suffrage by 1914.’ How far do you agree with this statement?



‘A successful campaign requires an effective leadership.’ To what extent does this explain the success of the campaign for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts in 1886 and the failure of the Women’s Social and Political Union to obtain votes for women by 1914?



Pearson

‘The WSPU’s popularity was a response to government inactivity in advancing the cause of women’s suffrage.’ To what extent this is a fair judgement of the rise of the WSPU between 1903 and 1914?



How far were Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst responsible for the rise of militancy within the women’s suffrage movement between 1903 and 1914?



Miscellaneous

‘The WSPU became popular because of its militant tactics.’ To what extent is this a fair judgement of the rise of the WSPU between 1908 – 1914?



‘How far was the Pankhurst family itself responsible for the failure of women to get the vote by 1914?



Trades Union militancy



  • The roles of Manny Shinwell, James Maxton, Ernest Bevin and J H Thomas; the events and significance of the Glasgow rent strike, 1915, and the 40-hour strike, 1917


Union revival after the First World War: the Triple Alliance; the impact of Black Friday, 1921; the importance of the Council of Action and the formation of the AEU and TGWU.

The General Strike, 1926: reasons for its occurrence and failure; roles of media, government and TUC; reasons for its failure; the Trades Disputes Act 1927




Topic/ Issue

Notes complete?

Revision?

Exam ready?

Shinwell









Maxton









Bevin









Thomas









Glasgow rent strike









40 hour strike









Triple Alliance









Black Friday 1921









Council of Action









Formation AEU & TGWU







Reasons for GS









GS: role of media









GS: role of government







GS: role of TUC









GS: reasons for failure







Trades Dispute Act












Hodder

To what extent was the coal miners’ union responsible for the General Strike in 1926?



The report of the Samuel Commission was the most significant development in the events from 1929 to 1926 that led to the outbreak of the General Strike.’ How far do you agree with this statement?



‘The Baldwin government was completely successful in dealing with the General Strike of 1926.’ How far do you agree with this statement?



To what extent did the TUC General Council bear the primary responsibility for the failure of the General Strike?



Pearson

‘The trade union movement represented a revolutionary threat to the British state between 1919 and 1921.’ Is this a fair statement regarding the industrial unrest in Britain after the First World War?



How far does the government’s anti-strike organisation following Red Friday explain the failure of the 1926 General Strike?

Miscellaneous

To what extent was there a revival in the fortunes of Trade Unions in the period 1919 – 27?



‘JH Thomas and Ernest Bevin were the most important influences on Trade Unionism in the period 1915 – 27.’ How far do you agree with this assessment?



To what extent did the aims of the largest Trade Unions change between 1917 and 1926?



Why was there a General Strike in 1926 but not in 1921?













Comparison questions



Leadership: Comparing leadership of two failed campaigns – Radical Reformers; Chartism; WSPU; Trades Union Militancy

Contrasting one of the above with the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts



Methods: Comparing the methods of two failed campaigns - Radical Reformers; Chartism; WSPU; Trades Union Militancy

Contrasting one of the above with the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts



Aims: Comparing the aims of two failed campaigns - Radical Reformers; Chartism; WSPU; Trades Union Militancy

Contrasting one of the above with the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts



Strength of opposition: Comparing the role of the opposition in the failure of - Radical Reformers; Chartism; WSPU; Trades Union Militancy

Contrasting one of the above with the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts



Strength of support: Comparing the strength of support in the failure of - Radical Reformers; Chartism; WSPU; Trades Union Militancy

Contrasting one of the above with the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts
0
reply
ChloeJaneSmith
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
anyone got any notes on trade union leaders they wouldnt mind sharing
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Bath
    Undergraduate Virtual Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 23 Feb '19
  • Ravensbourne University London
    School of Design, School of Media Further education
    Sat, 23 Feb '19
  • Leeds Trinity University
    PGCE Open Day Further education
    Sat, 23 Feb '19

Do you have a food intolerance or allergy?

Yes - a food intolerance (52)
12.97%
Yes - a food allergy (43)
10.72%
Yes - an autoimmune disorder (i.e coeliac, colitis) (11)
2.74%
Yes - I have an intolerance and allergy (9)
2.24%
No (286)
71.32%

Watched Threads

View All