rdlewiss
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I'm currently studying a levels however I don't really want to go to university but I don't want to do a low level apprenticeship as I have a lot of potential (predicted AAB) but I really want to go into marketing. Are there any routes to get into marketing
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999tigger
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(Original post by rdlewiss)
I'm currently studying a levels however I don't really want to go to university but I don't want to do a low level apprenticeship as I have a lot of potential (predicted AAB) but I really want to go into marketing. Are there any routes to get into marketing
There are different grades of apprenticeship, mystified why you are so dismissive.

If you arent interested then you will just have to get into a company that does marketing or has a marketing department and work your way up. Your ability should make progression straightforward plus you will get a salary and experience.

You could research marketing firms and find out what opportunities they have for school leavers.
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Minty
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I put a comment on this thread that you might have seen, thread might be useful.
I'd say don't rule out apprenticeships but they aren't the only route. I hear you re: not wanting to go to uni, but a degree with a placement year could be an option? Earning some cash and getting some experience in yr 3 of a 4 yr degree could be an option?

I'm a bit of an old man to be on here (I'm staff, work in marketing for TSR) - have worked in marketing (& uni's) for years - feel free to ask any marketing related Q's if you think I can help.
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rdlewiss
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(Original post by Minty)
I put a comment on this thread that you might have seen, thread might be useful.
I'd say don't rule out apprenticeships but they aren't the only route. I hear you re: not wanting to go to uni, but a degree with a placement year could be an option? Earning some cash and getting some experience in yr 3 of a 4 yr degree could be an option?

I'm a bit of an old man to be on here (I'm staff, work in marketing for TSR) - have worked in marketing (& uni's) for years - feel free to ask any marketing related Q's if you think I can help.

Hi, thanks for answering and giving advice, I appreciate it!
I guess I'm just wondering how varied is the work? I'm a firm believer in not wanting my life to become repetitive especially in my career. Is marketing like a 9-5 job doing the same kind of things everyday or is each day different? and also, is marketing good for people who are quite shy and introvert or do you have to be a very extroverted person?
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Minty
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(Original post by rdlewiss)
Hi, thanks for answering and giving advice, I appreciate it!
I guess I'm just wondering how varied is the work? I'm a firm believer in not wanting my life to become repetitive especially in my career. Is marketing like a 9-5 job doing the same kind of things everyday or is each day different? and also, is marketing good for people who are quite shy and introvert or do you have to be a very extroverted person?
Great question. Unfortunately there isn't an easy answer.

Marketing can be very varied. Generally as an industry it's all about being responsive to whats going on in the market and new opportunities so being agile is really important, but then some people have super-specialised roles where they geek out on detail. You'll find real variety in a lot of larger marketing departments and in marketing companies / agencies. We have a data person whose job is v similar to an accountant, but then we have people who never do the same thing twice. You can find roles to suit you and you might surprise yourself - its nice to really feel like you own something and can be the specialist in a tool you use everyday.

In terms of your personality I would be relaxed about that. Marketing environments are generally pretty social places (music on, bars and social areas in offices etc., table tennis/ air hockey etc.) but it takes all sorts.

When I recruit junior people the first question I ask is will they get stuff done / do what they say they will do. Really I want a safe pair of hands. Then I ask if they'll fit in, and that all revolves around the team and their manager - I'm afraid to say that getting your first few jobs anywhere can be a bit of a lottery like that.

Also company cultures are often pretty much like you imagine them to be. I worked at a uni where everyone worked quietly on their own job. TSR is a lot more chaotic and noisy. So if you wanted studious culture you could look at banks, utilities, insurance etc - or if you want super friendly young companies go for youth brands.
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rdlewiss
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(Original post by Minty)
Great question. Unfortunately there isn't an easy answer.

Marketing can be very varied. Generally as an industry it's all about being responsive to whats going on in the market and new opportunities so being agile is really important, but then some people have super-specialised roles where they geek out on detail. You'll find real variety in a lot of larger marketing departments and in marketing companies / agencies. We have a data person whose job is v similar to an accountant, but then we have people who never do the same thing twice. You can find roles to suit you and you might surprise yourself - its nice to really feel like you own something and can be the specialist in a tool you use everyday.

In terms of your personality I would be relaxed about that. Marketing environments are generally pretty social places (music on, bars and social areas in offices etc., table tennis/ air hockey etc.) but it takes all sorts.

When I recruit junior people the first question I ask is will they get stuff done / do what they say they will do. Really I want a safe pair of hands. Then I ask if they'll fit in, and that all revolves around the team and their manager - I'm afraid to say that getting your first few jobs anywhere can be a bit of a lottery like that.

Also company cultures are often pretty much like you imagine them to be. I worked at a uni where everyone worked quietly on their own job. TSR is a lot more chaotic and noisy. So if you wanted studious culture you could look at banks, utilities, insurance etc - or if you want super friendly young companies go for youth brands.
Thanks this is super helpful! How hard would you say it is to get into marketing and what do employers usually look for the most and please them the most?
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Minty
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Ah. Now. It's easy to get *a* job in marketing. You could get a job as a marketing assistant tomorrow, do a bit of social media, help out with events and that. But if you want to make a career if it it's a by harder.
My view is you need to be surrounded by smart people who's brains you can pick and specialists you can learn from and have access to a lot of variety. I generally recommend agency roles for first jobs for that reason - loads of access to budget, different clients and specialists.
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rdlewiss
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(Original post by Minty)
Ah. Now. It's easy to get *a* job in marketing. You could get a job as a marketing assistant tomorrow, do a bit of social media, help out with events and that. But if you want to make a career if it it's a by harder.
My view is you need to be surrounded by smart people who's brains you can pick and specialists you can learn from and have access to a lot of variety. I generally recommend agency roles for first jobs for that reason - loads of access to budget, different clients and specialists.
I see what you mean. It's more about working your way up from the bottom, right?


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Minty
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(Original post by rdlewiss)
I see what you mean. It's more about working your way up from the bottom, right?


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Kind of. I suppose what I'm saying is there's lots of different jobs / environments and its all about finding one that you can learn the most from. "A" job is easy to find, the right job is harder.
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Minty
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(Original post by rdlewiss)
what do employers usually look for the most and please them the most?
missed half of this Q.

Probably look for a few things

* "Fit" - can they picture you in the company, would you fit in with the culture, are you too loud, too quiet, too laid back etc. not a lot you can do about this one.

* Personal qualities - a young person in an office needs to be a safe pair of hands. they need to do what they say they will do, & do it well and on time. they need to speak up if there's an issue but quietly go about their business when there isn't. they need to work well with people and be willing to learn (and not think they know it all!)

* Someone who "gets" marketing - so you might not be a marketer, but hopefully you can talk marketing and show some marketing skills.

Talking marketing - you'll probs be asked about your favourite ads, branding, brands on social media, products/ service - especially on youth brands. This is because we want to hear a few words that show you "get it". "I love Innocent's tone of voice on social media", "I love the production standards on a M&S ad", "Paddy Power really understand their audience in their social media", "ASOS imagery is so authentically youthful", "the user experience on instagram is so straightforward I find it easy to use"

Showing marketing skills - your CV is a marketing document, like you'll have to prepare at work. is it good looking? a nice font? clear and clean? there are some great templates out there that you can use. Keeping it to one side shows an appreciation of audience - your recruiter will be busy, and all the CVs will be very similar (you havent got a great deal to talk about yet) so make it easy for them. Dont say too much - I see a lot of CVs that have "ASDA cashier" on with five bullet points. Really "Asda cashier" will probably do.

Also think about your digital profile. I love to see a blog, twitter or even insta account that would ideally be about marketing but could be about anything. I once recruited a guy based, to an extent, on a YouTube account with hundreds of thousands of views and a funny twitter bio. It shows that you "get it" if you can use these channels well - your job will probs be similar
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rdlewiss
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(Original post by Minty)
Kind of. I suppose what I'm saying is there's lots of different jobs / environments and its all about finding one that you can learn the most from. "A" job is easy to find, the right job is harder.
Right! Now I understand. I guess I really need to get some work experience in marketing to see the environment and whether it's something I want to pursue. Thank you so much for the help and advice I appreciate it so much, it's been very helpful!


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Minty
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(Original post by rdlewiss)
Right! Now I understand. I guess I really need to get some work experience in marketing to see the environment and whether it's something I want to pursue. Thank you so much for the help and advice I appreciate it so much, it's been very helpful!


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A pleasure - good luck!
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a degree does help.. but experience seems to be key.. i'm looking to get into it, got a degree but doing another course to gain skills in the industry.. hard to look for things in the field i find.. if you don't have a degree then an apprenticeship is a great way in
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Hello

I know you posted this a year ago but I thought you might be able to give me some advice on how to get into marketing...

I am a 23 year old graduate with an arts degree. I have been feeling very lost recently and unsure about which route to take career wise. A friend suggested I try to get into marketing, however I am not sure how I would get my foot in the door as someone with no experience and an unrelated degree.

I think I could be really good at marketing but do not know where to start. Would be good to hear back from you. Please be honest if you think I have a chance or not as someone with a degree in an unrelated field.
(Original post by Minty)
I put a comment on this thread that you might have seen, thread might be useful.
I'd say don't rule out apprenticeships but they aren't the only route. I hear you re: not wanting to go to uni, but a degree with a placement year could be an option? Earning some cash and getting some experience in yr 3 of a 4 yr degree could be an option?

I'm a bit of an old man to be on here (I'm staff, work in marketing for TSR) - have worked in marketing (& uni's) for years - feel free to ask any marketing related Q's if you think I can help.
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LRE
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hollyhamilton Just because you didn't do a marketing related degree doesn't mean you can't get into marketing. Some graduate entry level jobs don't specify marketing just 'degree educated'. Have a look at Sphere graduate recruitment, they have a lot of entry level graduate jobs. Good luck.
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