Inner London is the most religious part of the country Watch

Iridocyclitis
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...arents-beliefs

Interesting statistic. Most people view rural areas outside London as the religious strongholds, yet Inner London is apparently the most religious part of the country.
0
reply
QE2
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by Iridocyclitis)
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...arents-beliefs

Interesting statistic. Most people view rural areas outside London as the religious strongholds, yet Inner London is apparently the most religious part of the country.
Apparently this is due to the high proportion of immigrant and ethnic communities, who tend to be more religious that the native population.
https://www.stmarys.ac.uk/research/c...opulation.aspx
0
reply
DetectivePeralta
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
While it's not as prevalent here as it used to be, Christianity is actually booming in China, interestingly:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...-15-years.html

Could have the world's largest Christian population in the world soon
0
reply
Ladbants
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
I doubt the accuracy of this poll. The official census results are a much bigger sample and show that 59% of the country is Christian, 5% Muslim and around 25% have no religion.

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...011/2012-12-11
0
reply
QE2
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Ladbants)
I doubt the accuracy of this poll. The official census results are a much bigger sample and show that 59% of the country is Christian, 5% Muslim and around 25% have no religion.

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...011/2012-12-11
But the official census used a loaded question. It asked people what religion they were and gave a list of options. The results included the culturally and nominally religious.

The British Humanist society carried out a follow-up survey using the same question as on the census, and a follow up question of "Are you religious"?

The census question elicited a similar response to the actual census, but the same people responded to the "Are you religious" question very differently. 65% said "No" while only 29% said "Yes".
0
reply
DetectivePeralta
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by QE2)
But the official census used a loaded question. It asked people what religion they were and gave a list of options. The results included the culturally and nominally religious.

The British Humanist society carried out a follow-up survey using the same question as on the census, and a follow up question of "Are you religious"?

The census question elicited a similar response to the actual census, but the same people responded to the "Are you religious" question very differently. 65% said "No" while only 29% said "Yes".
Yeah but you could have a religion and not classify yourself as religious. A lot of people would interpret 'relgious' to mean someone who strictly follows and practices their religion, which isn't necessarily in order to be a member of that religion. For example, a Christian may not be 'religious' in the sense of going to church every week, praying every day and fasting during lent, but if they believe in Jesus Christ as being Lord and Saviour they are still a Christian. The best question would be 'What are your religious beliefs?" with a list of religions.

For example, my friend is Muslim and he believes in Islam but he doesn't practise it and doesn't pray or go to the mosque and he drinks alcohol, that doesn't mean he's not a Muslim. But it might mean he's not 'religious'.
0
reply
QE2
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by Trapz99)
Yeah but you could have a religion and not classify yourself as religious. A lot of people would interpret 'relgious' to mean someone who strictly follows and practices their religion, which isn't necessarily in order to be a member of that religion. For example, a Christian may not be 'religious' in the sense of going to church every week, praying every day and fasting during lent, but if they believe in Jesus Christ as being Lord and Saviour they are still a Christian. The best question would be 'What are your religious beliefs?" with a list of religions.

For example, my friend is Muslim and he believes in Islam but he doesn't practise it and doesn't pray or go to the mosque and he drinks alcohol, that doesn't mean he's not a Muslim. But it might mean he's not 'religious'.
In a recent global survey of religiosity (that found "not religious/atheist" to be the largest single religiously defined group - even larger than "Christian"), it was defined as...
"Irrespective of whether you attend a place of worship or not, would you say you are a religious person, not a religious persons or a convinced atheist ?"
0
reply
DetectivePeralta
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by QE2)
In a recent global survey of religiosity (that found "not religious/atheist" to be the largest single religiously defined group - even larger than "Christian", it was defined as...
"Irrespective of whether you attend a place of worship or not, would you say you are a religious person, not a religious persons or a convinced atheist ?"
But did the people answering the British Humanists' survey know that that was the exact question? Because if not then people can interpret the meaning of the word relgious in different ways. 'What is your religion?' is just much easier to understand.
0
reply
QE2
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by Trapz99)
For example, my friend is Muslim and he believes in Islam but he doesn't practise it and doesn't pray or go to the mosque and he drinks alcohol, that doesn't mean he's not a Muslim. But it might mean he's not 'religious'.
By the rules of Islam, that means he is "not a Muslim". If you voluntarily reject the fundamental requirements of a particular group, it is difficult to claim that you belong to that group.

It sounds like he is the classic "cultural religionist". He self-identifies with Islam because of a lifetime of indoctrination and familiarity, but voluntarily rejects all the individual aspects of it.
He is neither a Muslim, nor is he religious.
0
reply
DetectivePeralta
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by QE2)
By the rules of Islam, that means he is "not a Muslim". If you voluntarily reject the fundamental requirements of a particular group, it is difficult to claim that you belong to that group.

It sounds like he is the classic "cultural religionist". He self-identifies with Islam because of a lifetime of indoctrination and familiarity, but voluntarily rejects all the individual aspects of it.
He is neither a Muslim, nor is he religious.
Well he does believe that what he does is wrong, he just doesn't really care much. I'd say anyone eves in the basic principles of a religion can be part of that religion. For example, in Christianity, I'd say anyone who believes Jesus Christ is Lord and Saviour is a Christian, regardless of their life choices.
0
reply
QE2
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by Trapz99)
But did the people answering the British Humanists' survey know that that was the exact question? Because if not then people can interpret the meaning of the word relgious in different ways. 'What is your religion?' is just much easier to understand.
"Are you religious" is a pretty clear question, and while I accept that on its own it could be questioned, the results are supported by the detailed, worldwide survey.

I appreciate it is difficult for the religious to accept that lack of belief in organised religion is shrinking rapidly, but it appears to be an observable phenomenon.

Note: belief in a non-specific, supernatural power is not "religious". While I personally consider it unlikely, it is not entirely unreasonable to hold such a belief.
0
reply
QE2
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by Trapz99)
Well he does believe that what he does is wrong, he just doesn't really care much.
In which case, he clearly does not believe Islam to be true! t is just a remnant of social conditioning. Such things are hard to entirely shake off.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you made up your mind on your five uni choices?

Yes I know where I'm applying (56)
66.67%
No I haven't decided yet (18)
21.43%
Yes but I might change my mind (10)
11.9%

Watched Threads

View All