Please Help!!! (Analysing some quotes from Jekyll & Hyde)

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anonomon
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Could people please help me analyse these quotes from Jekyll & Hyde for my GCSE English Lit exam.... :
1 - "If it came to a trial, your name might appear."
2 - "I had been safe of all mens respect, wealthy, beloved."
- I dont get this quote.... its Jekyll saying it....
3 - "The door....was blistered and distained."
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Lit teacher
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(Original post by anonomon)
Could people please help me analyse these quotes from Jekyll & Hyde for my GCSE English Lit exam.... :
1 - "If it came to a trial, your name might appear."
2 - "I had been safe of all mens respect, wealthy, beloved."
- I dont get this quote.... its Jekyll saying it....
3 - "The door....was blistered and distained."
The first two reveal the power of public image and opinion. For men such as Jekyll and Utterson, their whole life had been spent working hard to gain the respect of their fellow men. This reveals one aspect of Victorian life at that time, that for a certain class of men honour was everything. Jekyll has a reputation for hard work and sober behaviour. All of that could be ruined if his name was linked to Hyde. The irony of this is not clear to the reader at this point in the text.
In order to show the extreme sides of human nature Stevenson has created Jekyll to be as good as possible (in the second quote, respected, wealthy, loved by all) and Hyde to be the absolute opposite; a man who could beat someone to death and trample a child underfoot.

The third quote shows Stevenson using the description of the building to reflect the character of the person who uses it. Everything about Hyde is corrupted. The housekeeper of his rented rooms is a foul tempered woman, his physical appearance is deformed, his face provokes feelings of anger and revulsion and even the door he uses is blistered and distained. It follows the idea that the evil inside someone can be seen through their physical appearance. Think of how many film villains live in dark and gloomy buildings. Just as Jekyll and Hyde are two faces of the same man, so this door is found to link to the building that Jekyll lives in, with its clean hallway, bright fire and cosy rooms attended by servants.
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username3118072
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(Original post by anonomon)
Could people please help me analyse these quotes from Jekyll & Hyde for my GCSE English Lit exam.... :
1 - "If it came to a trial, your name might appear."
2 - "I had been safe of all mens respect, wealthy, beloved."
- I dont get this quote.... its Jekyll saying it....
3 - "The door....was blistered and distained."
I think was Lit Teacher said is more or less correct.

I would add, that for the third quote, the door acts as a symbol. Why would Stevenson describe "door" so intently? Doors symbolise knowledge yet to be discovered. Maybe the "blistered and distained" door has some blistered and distained knowledge behind it?
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jamesg2
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Quote 1, comes from Mr. Utterson. It is spoken after Carew has been murdered and Utterson is warning Jekyll that should the presence of Hyde be traced back to him then it is likely a trial will occur. The point being that Jekyll's reputation will suffer. Implied in this scene is the point that Utterson does not believe Jekyll and is pointing out the dangers to which Jekyll is placing himself.

Quote 2, you have shortened. The full quote is “A moment before I had been safe of all men’s respect, wealthy, beloved–the cloth laying for me in the dining - room at home; and now I was the common quarry of mankind, hunted, houseless, a known murderer, thrall to the gallows.” It comes from Jekyll's full statement. This refers to the Regent's Park Incident. That was the moment that - without warning - Jekyll who is taking a walk in Regent's Park suddenly finds himself changed back to Hyde. He is away from his home and his potions and - aware he (Hyde) is being hunted for murder - knows that if he is caught he will be hung.

Quote 3, you have shortened. the full quote is "The door, which was equipped with neither bell nor knocker, was blistered and distained." It is from the beginning of the story. Basically it points out that the door - just like the rest of the house - is not being looked after. To be "distained" means it is blotched and discoloured. The house is in Soho - described in Jekyll's statement - so who is going to want to decorate and upkeep a house in Soho without attracting attention. And attention is not something Jekyll wants.

I am not sure I can agree with the description of Hyde being as evil as described. The injury of the girl was an accident. Jekyll admits that in his statement. Two months before the Carew murder Jekyll awakes in bed and discovers he has turned into Hyde. He decides for two month to have nothing to do with Hyde and refrains from taking the potion. When he does relent - two months later - Hyde is Hyde is hopping mad and dancing off the ceiling. It is jekyll who decides to take Hyde out into London in this state. have a read of jekyll's statement on how he finds Hyde when he returned to him after that break. I would venture that Jekyll also has responsibility for what happened. And the third incident when he strikes the woman who offers him matches, that takes place in Regent's Park when jekyll/Hyde is both terrified and frantic to get to safety,

We often refer to this novel's theme as that of duality. Worth remembering that there is singlarity as well as duality. Everywhere Hyde goes jekyll also goes. Indeed it is Jekyll who takes Hyde to the places he visits.
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anonomon
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(Original post by Lit teacher)
The first two reveal the power of public image and opinion. For men such as Jekyll and Utterson, their whole life had been spent working hard to gain the respect of their fellow men. This reveals one aspect of Victorian life at that time, that for a certain class of men honour was everything. Jekyll has a reputation for hard work and sober behaviour. All of that could be ruined if his name was linked to Hyde. The irony of this is not clear to the reader at this point in the text.
.
What is the irony ??? (sorry if it sounds like a stupid question)
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Lit teacher
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(Original post by anonomon)
What is the irony ??? (sorry if it sounds like a stupid question)
The irony comes from Utterson not wanting his friend Jekyll to have his reputation dragged through the courts. Any association with Hyde could destroy his image as a sober and respectable citizen. It is only later that we realize that Jekyll IS Hyde. The man that Utterson wants to warn Jekyll about is the same man standing in front of him.
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anonomon
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(Original post by Lit teacher)
The irony comes from Utterson not wanting his friend Jekyll to have his reputation dragged through the courts. Any association with Hyde could destroy his image as a sober and respectable citizen. It is only later that we realize that Jekyll IS Hyde. The man that Utterson wants to warn Jekyll about is the same man standing in front of him.
Ok thank you!!
Also, i was wondering if you dont mind, if you would no how to analyse structure or form of a sentence as well as language for these quotes:

1 - "Sir,if that was my master, why had he a mask upon his face." - Poole - Chapter 8

2 - "In each of us, two natures are at war - the good and the evil." - Jekyll -

3 - "The man trapled calmly over the childs body...It wasnt like a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut".
(What does the semicolon do ???)

4 - "with ape-like fury, he was trampling his victim underfoot, and hailing down a storm of blows, under which the bones were audibly shattered..."
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jamesg2
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(Original post by anonomon)
Ok thank you!!
Also, i was wondering if you dont mind, if you would no how to analyse structure or form of a sentence as well as language for these quotes:

1 - "Sir,if that was my master, why had he a mask upon his face." - Poole - Chapter 8

2 - "In each of us, two natures are at war - the good and the evil." - Jekyll -

3 - "The man trapled calmly over the childs body...It wasnt like a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut".
(What does the semicolon do ???)

4 - "with ape-like fury, he was trampling his victim underfoot, and hailing down a storm of blows, under which the bones were audibly shattered..."

Quote 1:- “Sir, if that was my master, why had he a mask upon his face.”

Poole has glimpsed Mr. Hyde – not Doctor Jekyll. This – I believe when Doctor Jekyll woke up in bed to discover that involuntarily he had into Mr. Hyde. What Poole saw was a frantic Doctor Jekyll/Mr. Hyde searching for the potion. In this sense “mask” is a metaphor for Mr. Hyde compared to Doctor Jekyll.

However “mask” is really a metaphor for Doctor Jekyll concealment of the relationship between himself and hide. Only Lanyon is aware of the true relationship – and the shock kills him three weeks later. So “mask” can be considered a metaphor for how Doctor Jekyll’s determination to conceal that he is also Mr. Hyde. The household only know there is a person called Mr. Hyde, they do not know it is Doctor Jekyll.

Quote 2:- "In each of us, two natures are at war - the good and the evil."

I cannot find that quote. The nearest one to your quote is “This, as I take it, was because all human beings, as we meet them, are commingled out of good and evil: and Edward Hyde, alone in the ranks of mankind, was pure evil.”

This concept is at the heart of Doctor Jekyll endeavour. He recognises that man is a combination of “good” and “evil.” His thesis is if he can separate the evil in man and only leave the good then the world will be better. The creation of Mr. Hyde is Doctor Jekyll’s attempt to do that.

Quote 3:- “The man trapled calmly over the childs body...It wasnt like a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut.”

I am not sure you want to enter this cavern – however it is immensely interesting and rewarding if you do wish to do so.

Robert Louis Stevenson’s punctuation was unique. He wrote for speech and not for reading. That does not mean he did not expect people not to read his books, he certainly did. What I am saying is that he punctuated as though he was talking to you. In that sense his punctuation breaches many of the expected norms. E.g. you will find numerous instances where after a question mark there is a lower case letter as opposed to a captital.

In the case of the semicolon The semicolon, with its pause-virtually a full stop, yet not the end of a sentence-fits Stevenson's scheme beautifully: it is neither a terminal mark, like a period, nor an intermediate device, like a comma. This ambiguity is apparent even in simple compound sentences, where Stevenson almost invariably uses the semicolon. He does not separate the clauses with periods, nor does he use commas. And that is because he is punctuating as though he is speaking. It is as if he were not sure whether to make his statements independent or to connect them with the semicolon. Therefore Robert Louis Stevenson has built uncertainty into his style through the use of the semicolon.

Now for the quote. The semicolon links the subordinate clause to the main clause. But where a full stop could have divided the two clause Robert Louis Stevenson prefers the semicolon. The semicolon creates a pause but not a stop. In doing that the semicolon not only links the two – man and juggernaut – but it allows an emphasis and comparison between the two terms.

Quote 4:- “with ape-like fury, he was trampling his victim underfoot, and hailing down a storm of blows, under which the bones were audibly shattered...”

This is the murder of Sir Danvers Carew. I think the main point is the degree of violence and inhumanity. Mr. Hyde – who represents all that is the worst in human kind – is also described in inhuman terms “ape-like.” During the murder of Sir Danvers Mr. Hyde is not being recognised as a human being. This behaviour is the antithesis of what it is to be human.

Note Robert Louis Stevenson use of the comma here. Robert Louis Stevenson’s use of the comma was often used as a means for emphasis and a way of conveying the oral tone of the narrative itself.

You did not ask about it but here is something to think about. Within the novella there are eight occasions – five in Doctor Jekyll’s statement – where Robert Louis Stevenson writes “Hyde. I” bringing the two words – and more important the two people - into juxtaposition with each other and separating them by the full stop. The full stop is vital. The use of the full stop creates a wall between the two. However the two cannot be fully and completely separated because they are also linked by their assonant vowels. It is a wonderful example of underscoring that duality is also singularity.
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EzzaArmstrong49
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(Original post by jamesg2)

You did not ask about it but here is something to think about. Within the novella there are eight occasions – five in Doctor Jekyll’s statement – where Robert Louis Stevenson writes “Hyde. I” bringing the two words – and more important the two people - into juxtaposition with each other and separating them by the full stop. The full stop is vital. The use of the full stop creates a wall between the two. However the two cannot be fully and completely separated because they are also linked by their assonant vowels. It is a wonderful example of underscoring that duality is also singularity.
This is extremely helpful, thanks.
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PoetryBlues
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(Original post by jamesg2)
Quote 1:- “Sir, if that was my master, why had he a mask upon his face.”

Poole has glimpsed Mr. Hyde – not Doctor Jekyll. This – I believe when Doctor Jekyll woke up in bed to discover that involuntarily he had into Mr. Hyde. What Poole saw was a frantic Doctor Jekyll/Mr. Hyde searching for the potion. In this sense “mask” is a metaphor for Mr. Hyde compared to Doctor Jekyll.

However “mask” is really a metaphor for Doctor Jekyll concealment of the relationship between himself and hide. Only Lanyon is aware of the true relationship – and the shock kills him three weeks later. So “mask” can be considered a metaphor for how Doctor Jekyll’s determination to conceal that he is also Mr. Hyde. The household only know there is a person called Mr. Hyde, they do not know it is Doctor Jekyll.

Quote 2:- "In each of us, two natures are at war - the good and the evil."

I cannot find that quote. The nearest one to your quote is “This, as I take it, was because all human beings, as we meet them, are commingled out of good and evil: and Edward Hyde, alone in the ranks of mankind, was pure evil.”

This concept is at the heart of Doctor Jekyll endeavour. He recognises that man is a combination of “good” and “evil.” His thesis is if he can separate the evil in man and only leave the good then the world will be better. The creation of Mr. Hyde is Doctor Jekyll’s attempt to do that.

Quote 3:- “The man trapled calmly over the childs body...It wasnt like a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut.”

I am not sure you want to enter this cavern – however it is immensely interesting and rewarding if you do wish to do so.

Robert Louis Stevenson’s punctuation was unique. He wrote for speech and not for reading. That does not mean he did not expect people not to read his books, he certainly did. What I am saying is that he punctuated as though he was talking to you. In that sense his punctuation breaches many of the expected norms. E.g. you will find numerous instances where after a question mark there is a lower case letter as opposed to a captital.

In the case of the semicolon The semicolon, with its pause-virtually a full stop, yet not the end of a sentence-fits Stevenson's scheme beautifully: it is neither a terminal mark, like a period, nor an intermediate device, like a comma. This ambiguity is apparent even in simple compound sentences, where Stevenson almost invariably uses the semicolon. He does not separate the clauses with periods, nor does he use commas. And that is because he is punctuating as though he is speaking. It is as if he were not sure whether to make his statements independent or to connect them with the semicolon. Therefore Robert Louis Stevenson has built uncertainty into his style through the use of the semicolon.

Now for the quote. The semicolon links the subordinate clause to the main clause. But where a full stop could have divided the two clause Robert Louis Stevenson prefers the semicolon. The semicolon creates a pause but not a stop. In doing that the semicolon not only links the two – man and juggernaut – but it allows an emphasis and comparison between the two terms.

Quote 4:- “with ape-like fury, he was trampling his victim underfoot, and hailing down a storm of blows, under which the bones were audibly shattered...”

This is the murder of Sir Danvers Carew. I think the main point is the degree of violence and inhumanity. Mr. Hyde – who represents all that is the worst in human kind – is also described in inhuman terms “ape-like.” During the murder of Sir Danvers Mr. Hyde is not being recognised as a human being. This behaviour is the antithesis of what it is to be human.

Note Robert Louis Stevenson use of the comma here. Robert Louis Stevenson’s use of the comma was often used as a means for emphasis and a way of conveying the oral tone of the narrative itself.

You did not ask about it but here is something to think about. Within the novella there are eight occasions – five in Doctor Jekyll’s statement – where Robert Louis Stevenson writes “Hyde. I” bringing the two words – and more important the two people - into juxtaposition with each other and separating them by the full stop. The full stop is vital. The use of the full stop creates a wall between the two. However the two cannot be fully and completely separated because they are also linked by their assonant vowels. It is a wonderful example of underscoring that duality is also singularity.
Ummm wow that is some seriously in depth analysis! What level of education are you in now? I would imagine that sort of depth would have got you a 9 in Literature if you've already taken it?
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SwagMeidter47
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actually, the third quote is regarding Jekyll's backdoor, not Hyde's door. It is not meant to reflect on Hyde directly, rather Jekyll's secret. It's purpose is to contrast the front of the door, representing the duality of man and it also hints at the theme of homosexuality. I'm sure Jekyll's
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jamesg2
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Have you used the wrong quote, because the third quote I referenced has nothing to,do with Jekyll's front door.

Quote 3:- “The man trampled calmly over the child's body...It wasn't like a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut.”
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SwagMeidter47
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actually, the third quote is regarding Jekyll's backdoor, not Hyde's door. It is not meant to reflect on Hyde directly, rather Jekyll's secret. It's purpose is to contrast the front of the door, representing the duality of man and it also hints at the theme of homosexuality. I'm sure Jekyll's
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jamesg2
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With all due respect I cannot see how you can equate my third quote “The man trampled calmly over the child's body...It wasn't like a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut.” with anything to do with a door. That quotes describes Enfield witnessing Hyde trampling over the young girl's body and person.

It has nothing to do with doors. However Homosexuality can be linked Hyde. At a later point in the text Sir Danvers Carew goes up to Hyde to speak to him. The servant wonders whether he was asking for directions. However - and it is important we register this - the reader does not know what was actually said by Carew. All the reader has is the servant's interpretation.

Now Sir Danvers Carew only entered the novella on the final draft. The original character was a young man called Lemsome. Now although we do not have complete RLS drafts it is clear RSL described Lemsome as a homosexual. In addition there were numerous other homosexual references in the novella. It appears that one of the arguments RLS had with his wife over his reading his first draft was this homosexual images. We cannot verify this because as a consequence of this argument with his wife RLS burnt that complete draft in front of his wife.

Although it is clear that when Lemsome confronted Hyde he was likely to be propositioning Hyde. Howevere do not have evidence that Carew also did that. However - and here is where detailed scrutiny of the text helps - during this period when Carew interrupts Hyde Hyde is extraordinarily agitated ending in him attacking Carew. The attack is on Carew is ferrous. The servant is some distance from the confrontation. She is also indoors and also behind a glass window - yet she can hear Hyde breaking Carew's bones. Although by no means proof, it can well be argued that - like Lemsome - Carew may have propositioned Hyde.
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