QUB A100 Electives Watch

atlasvii
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Hi,

I'm an international student that will be attending QUB this fall. I was wondering if any current QUB Medicine students can fill me in on the number of electives that I can take. I want to maximize the electives I take abroad (in Canada) for the purposes of matching for residency.

Thanks!
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ahorey
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All placements are taken in Northern Ireland except for your official elective (end of 4th year/start of 5th) where you can go where you like. This is your only elective.
You have the option of Erasmus in 4th year for 2 placements (approx 12 weeks in total) which is done in Europe with linked universities.

You could potentially intercalate but i don't know if qub would allow anyone to do it in Canada.

Enjoy QUB, I hated the first 2 years as all academic but 3rd year on is practical clinical based (ie. hospitals based) which is so much better!
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atlasvii
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Thanks for the info. I'll likely be doing the electives during my summer vacation then, probably after I write the USMLE step 1. Quite a few Canadian universities are open to international students doing electives. I'll likely have to try to organize them myself in my own time outside of school. I've spent the past 8 years in university now so I'm pretty used to the borig academic portion. I'll probably get a part time job and do some travelling when I can. I've probably gone through a good portion of the material a few times in various courses.
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ahorey
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(Original post by atlasvii)
Thanks for the info. I'll likely be doing the electives during my summer vacation then, probably after I write the USMLE step 1. Quite a few Canadian universities are open to international students doing electives. I'll likely have to try to organize them myself in my own time outside of school. I've spent the past 8 years in university now so I'm pretty used to the borig academic portion. I'll probably get a part time job and do some travelling when I can. I've probably gone through a good portion of the material a few times in various courses.
If you do the step 1 during 3rd year you will only have one summer (end of June to mid August) left as the next year is actual elective during the summer. The girls that did it said they couldn't have done it any sooner.
I don't think qub will let you do electives during summers of 1st/2nd year summers as you haven't done any clinical work (except sit with a GP 1 afternoon a week) and it might affect their liability etc. A lot of hospitals won't take you for electives until you are end of 4th/start of final year.
You will need to get permission from queens to do the electives abroad.
I was a graduate entry as well but the amount of work is very heavy, although they have changed the format of 1st/2nd year now so it may be more manageable. It doesn't matter how much of course you've done before you still have to go to the classes and learn it qub way.
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atlasvii
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Huh interesting. Was there a particular reason that they couldn't do it any sooner? I've been going through the resources (First Aid, Pathoma, etc.) and it doesn't sound impractical to spend 2 years slowly studying it and taking it summer of second year. I actually haven't found very much on what the courses would be like at all online which was kind of frustrating. Do they focus on physiology and anatomy or do you have to take all the irrelevant undergrad courses again. Both my degrees were in Physiology/cellular physiology (ie. dedicated courses in neuroanatomy, pathology, laboratory medicine, histology, pharmacology, neuroscience, cardiology, endocrinology, etc.) so I'm hoping that will ease the work load since most of the concepts will not be new apart from more pathology integration. What constitutes the majority of the workload? Is it learning/studying/examinations or is it assignments? Apologies ahead of time for all the questions but I've received/found scarce little on what the program is like and I'm the type that likes to plan things ahead of time when I can.
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ahorey
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(Original post by atlasvii)
Huh interesting. Was there a particular reason that they couldn't do it any sooner? I've been going through the resources (First Aid, Pathoma, etc.) and it doesn't sound impractical to spend 2 years slowly studying it and taking it summer of second year. I actually haven't found very much on what the courses would be like at all online which was kind of frustrating. Do they focus on physiology and anatomy or do you have to take all the irrelevant undergrad courses again. Both my degrees were in Physiology/cellular physiology (ie. dedicated courses in neuroanatomy, pathology, laboratory medicine, histology, pharmacology, neuroscience, cardiology, endocrinology, etc.) so I'm hoping that will ease the work load since most of the concepts will not be new apart from more pathology integration. What constitutes the majority of the workload? Is it learning/studying/examinations or is it assignments? Apologies ahead of time for all the questions but I've received/found scarce little on what the program is like and I'm the type that likes to plan things ahead of time when I can.
First and second year you do Histology (1st only), Pathology, Physiology, Anatomy, Pharmacology, Public health/Populations. Plus clinical skills (examined end of both years also). Also do Communication skills. And both years you will do 2 SSCs (which are extra compulsory modules in a wide variety of subject) which are coursework assessed.
At the end of 2nd year you do a module called end of phase which integrates all of 1st and 2nd year material into a more clinical type paper.
The sheer workload of 2nd year is what most people find difficult.
Physiology is a SBA MCQ, clinical is practical OSCEs and all the others are written. Anatomy is also examined throughout the year in mini exams which count towards final grade but are not compensatory. About twice a term, covering an area of anatomy. Also in path/pharm and populations you do group projects together as well, and I think communication skills you do as well. All modules are compulsory.

You don't really study in-depth clinical endo/cardio etc. until 3rd year which is when you cover specialities out in practice.

If you have done a lot of the physiology and anatomy before you will probably not find it as difficult as others, but the difficulty is not so much the learning its more the amount you need to learn.
Does that help? Not sure how to describe but the majority of 1st/2nd year is spent in lectures, tutorials, dissection room and physiology lab. One afternoon a week is clinical attachment and one afternoon/morning every 2 weeks is clinical skills centre.
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atlasvii
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(Original post by ahorey)
First and second year you do Histology (1st only), Pathology, Physiology, Anatomy, Pharmacology, Public health/Populations. Plus clinical skills (examined end of both years also). Also do Communication skills. And both years you will do 2 SSCs (which are extra compulsory modules in a wide variety of subject) which are coursework assessed.
At the end of 2nd year you do a module called end of phase which integrates all of 1st and 2nd year material into a more clinical type paper.
The sheer workload of 2nd year is what most people find difficult.
Physiology is a SBA MCQ, clinical is practical OSCEs and all the others are written. Anatomy is also examined throughout the year in mini exams which count towards final grade but are not compensatory. About twice a term, covering an area of anatomy. Also in path/pharm and populations you do group projects together as well, and I think communication skills you do as well. All modules are compulsory.

You don't really study in-depth clinical endo/cardio etc. until 3rd year which is when you cover specialities out in practice.

If you have done a lot of the physiology and anatomy before you will probably not find it as difficult as others, but the difficulty is not so much the learning its more the amount you need to learn.
Does that help? Not sure how to describe but the majority of 1st/2nd year is spent in lectures, tutorials, dissection room and physiology lab. One afternoon a week is clinical attachment and one afternoon/morning every 2 weeks is clinical skills centre.
yeah! that helps a lot actually. i appreciate you writing that all out for me. so there is actually a cadaver lab? i was regretting not taking the cadaver dissection in undergrad because i was under the impression that most med schools in the uk don't do dissection. lastly because l]attendance in lecture is mandatory, i assume that there aren't any lecture podcasts? over here most lectures are recorded and you can attend if you want to or not. many opt to just watch the lecture at 2x speed at home instead.
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ahorey
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(Original post by atlasvii)
yeah! that helps a lot actually. i appreciate you writing that all out for me. so there is actually a cadaver lab? i was regretting not taking the cadaver dissection in undergrad because i was under the impression that most med schools in the uk don't do dissection. lastly because l]attendance in lecture is mandatory, i assume that there aren't any lecture podcasts? over here most lectures are recorded and you can attend if you want to or not. many opt to just watch the lecture at 2x speed at home instead.
Yep there is a dissection/cadever lab, which was all done up recently so has all top technology. It's one of the few that do proper dissection

There are lecture slides online (some don't go up until after the lectures) but no podcasts. You definitely need to go to the end of phase and physiology/pharm/path lectures as they say a lot that isn't always on the slides. From 3rd year on you have all lectures online with audio but these are to be done on top of clinical (as 3rd year on you are hospital based). Some lectures have sign in sheets, not all. Tutorials/practicals etc. Are all compulsory and will defo have sign in sheets
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atlasvii
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(Original post by ahorey)
Yep there is a dissection/cadever lab, which was all done up recently so has all top technology. It's one of the few that do proper dissection

There are lecture slides online (some don't go up until after the lectures) but no podcasts. You definitely need to go to the end of phase and physiology/pharm/path lectures as they say a lot that isn't always on the slides. From 3rd year on you have all lectures online with audio but these are to be done on top of clinical (as 3rd year on you are hospital based). Some lectures have sign in sheets, not all. Tutorials/practicals etc. Are all compulsory and will defo have sign in sheets
oh good! now i'm excited haha. there's only so much you can learn from pictures and video. shame about the lecture slides after lecture though. i usually like to write on them. maybe if i ask nicely haha. thanks again!
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