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    Hello all! This thread is where I will be answering any questions and writing my predictions on the C2 AQA chemistry GCSE exam for 2017. Post your questions and I will get back to you here.

    I'm a chemistry teacher with 10 year's experience. I have taught AQA for 8 of those years, gone through all of the exams, marks schemes and examiners's notes for this specification more times than I can count and know the specification intimately.

    First of all, I have attached a powerpoint summarising C2. But watch this space...
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  1. File Type: pptx C2 revision.pptx (2.46 MB, 223 views)
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    (Original post by Yorrick)
    Hello all! This thread is where I will be answering any questions and writing my predictions on the C2 AQA chemistry GCSE exam for 2017. Post your questions and I will get back to you here.

    I'm a chemistry teacher with 10 year's experience. I have taught AQA for 8 of those years, gone through all of the exams, marks schemes and examiners's notes for this specification more times than I can count and know the specification intimately.

    First of all, I have attached a powerpoint summarising C2. But watch this space...
    Hello , I've been doing many past papers , and rates of reaction comes up a lot in all of the ones I have done. Do you think it will come up much since it is the last year of this specification and they will probably want to test us on the topics they haven't tested much or at all in these past exams. Thank you
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    Hello, do you have a prediction for the 6 mark question?
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    considering how 'straight forward' the chemistry paper 1 was- does this mean that papers 2 and 3 will more likely than not, be very difficult? and if so, which topics would be deemed the hardest ones? thank you!
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    what topics do you predict will come up next week, your last predictions were very accurate!
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    (Original post by Yorrick)
    Hello all! This thread is where I will be answering any questions and writing my predictions on the C2 AQA chemistry GCSE exam for 2017. Post your questions and I will get back to you here.

    I'm a chemistry teacher with 10 year's experience. I have taught AQA for 8 of those years, gone through all of the exams, marks schemes and examiners's notes for this specification more times than I can count and know the specification intimately.

    First of all, I have attached a powerpoint summarising C2. But watch this space...
    Hi I have got my C2 and C3 aqa gcse exams on this wednesday please please please if you see this please tell me any kind of predictions you have for C2 bcoz your last ones were very accurate
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    Predictions?
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    (Original post by munibahq)
    Hello , I've been doing many past papers , and rates of reaction comes up a lot in all of the ones I have done. Do you think it will come up much since it is the last year of this specification and they will probably want to test us on the topics they haven't tested much or at all in these past exams. Thank you
    It will come up. The definite things that come up are things that haven't been covered yet on the specification.

    However, they need to cover something from every section of the specification and rates is a huge part. There will be something on one aspect of what affects the rate of reaction or one rates practical at least.
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    (Original post by DarkLink)
    considering how 'straight forward' the chemistry paper 1 was- does this mean that papers 2 and 3 will more likely than not, be very difficult? and if so, which topics would be deemed the hardest ones? thank you!
    In C2, if you find calculations a problem, then the chemistry calculations will be the hardest topic. If you don't, then electrolysis is the hardest topic for most people.

    In C3, if you find calculations a problem, then the hardest thing is titrations and bond energy calculations. If not, then the changing conditions on an equilibrium reaction and, part of that, the Haber process will be a problem.
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    (Original post by Chloeharrison01)
    Hello, do you have a prediction for the 6 mark question?
    In C2and C3, the most common 6 mark questions are about how to take part in a practical. In this book if you have it, it is any practical in a yellow box marked practical.
    Less common questions are about evaluating a set of results, or in one case in C2, comparing the structure and properties of different substances.
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    Here are my predictions based on the fact that they haven't come up in the C2 exams from June 2013, June 2014, June 2015 or June 2016.

    Representing the bonding in metals like:Name:  gcsechem_60.gif
Views: 324
Size:  16.2 KB

    Carbon can also form fullerenes with different numbers of carbon atoms. Fullerenes can be used for drug delivery into the body, in lubricants, as catalysts, and in nanotubes for reinforcing materials.

    The relative mass of an element compares the mass of atoms of the element with the 12C isotope. It is an average value for the isotope of the element.

    Even though no atoms are gained or lost in a chemical reaction, it is not always possible to obtain the calculated amount of product because:

    Some of the product may be lost when separated from the reaction mixture.
    Some of the reactants may react in ways different to the expected reaction.

    The rate of a chemical reaction can be found by measuring the amount of reactant used or the amount of product formed over time.

    Evaluate everyday uses of exothermic and endothermic reactions.

    Soluble salts can be made from acids by reacting them with insoluble bases - the base is added to the solid until no more will react and the excess solid is filtered off.

    Insoluble salts can be made by mixing appropriate solutions of ions so that a precipitate is formed. Precipitation can be used to remove unwanted ions from solutions, for example in treating water for drinking or in treating effluent.

    Other things to consider when revising:

    There will be questions on practicals. If you have this book, then it's any practical in a yellow box with the word practical on it. I also have attached a powerpoint of practicals.

    3 times, the have been questions about should science answer a particular question. Science should only answer questions that have measurable results. If a statement starts with "should", then science cannot answer it. Science cannot answer ethical or economic questions.

    Whenever there is an equation, look at it. Especially look at the state symbols. Sometimes there are questions asking what you would observe in a reaction. If one of the products is a gas, you would observe bubbles. If there is a solid reactant, but not a solid product, then you would see a product disappear.

    Also, one question had an equation where magnesium was in a gaseous state. This was the sign that the reaction takes place at a high temperature.
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  2. File Type: pptx Practicals on C2 exam.pptx (160.6 KB, 59 views)
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    hi, I’ve read on another thread someone thinks titration will come up... i have no idea what that is or where to find it in the revision guides- what does it come under?
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    (Original post by cate.gravey)
    hi, I’ve read on another thread someone thinks titration will come up... i have no idea what that is or where to find it in the revision guides- what does it come under?
    A titration is a method to see how strong an acid is by seeing how much alkali is needed to neutralise it. Or seeing how strong an alkali is by seeing how much acid is needed to neutralise it.

    The Bitesize link is here:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebit...ionsrev3.shtml

    Titrations are part of C3. However, there was a C2 question where you basically had to describe a titration, so it is worth having a look at it. It is question 2a on this paper where you have to find out how much of an alkali you need to make a pure salt from an acid. The trick is to remember that if you use an indicator, it is not pure, so you then have to do it again with the amounts you used the first time, but without an indicator.
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  3. File Type: pdf 2012 Jun AQA C2 H Mark scheme.PDF (197.3 KB, 104 views)
  4. File Type: pdf 2012 Jun AQA C2 H Examiners report.pdf (64.8 KB, 47 views)
  5. Attached Files
  6. File Type: docx Q2a.docx (69.8 KB, 48 views)
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    ahh thank you!!
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    any last minute help on c2 and c3? Thank you
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    (Original post by help.2017)
    any last minute help on c2 and c3? Thank you
    Just readmy predictions in this thread and my C3 thread. Make sure your calculations are well practised. Make sure you know the procedures to the practicals you did and the practicals in your textbook and make sure you read all equations with their state symbols before you answer any questions with them.
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    What was the calculation question answer??
 
 
 
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