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    The thermal decomposition of hexafluoropropene (C3F6), in the temperature range 825-950K and in the initial pressure range 6.7 – 54.7 kN m–2, was analysed as a function of reaction time using gas-phase chromatography and IR spectroscopy. The half-life (t1/2) of C3F6 was measured as a function of the initial C3F6 concentration at 872 K: the results for the initial pressures of 6.8 kN m–2, 13.6 kN m–2 and 27.2 kN m–2 were 4200 s, 3840 s and 3480 s, respectively.


    I've worked out that this reaction is first order

    And the half life equation would be

    ln2/t = k to find out the rate constant

    But I'm not sure what t (half-life) would be?

    Thank you
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    (Original post by Bloom77)
    The thermal decomposition of hexafluoropropene (C3F6), in the temperature range 825-950K and in the initial pressure range 6.7 – 54.7 kN m–2, was analysed as a function of reaction time using gas-phase chromatography and IR spectroscopy. The half-life (t1/2) of C3F6 was measured as a function of the initial C3F6 concentration at 872 K: the results for the initial pressures of 6.8 kN m–2, 13.6 kN m–2 and 27.2 kN m–2 were 4200 s, 3840 s and 3480 s, respectively.


    I've worked out that this reaction is first order

    And the half life equation would be

    ln2/t = k to find out the rate constant

    But I'm not sure what t (half-life) would be?

    Thank you
    With first order kinetics the half-life is constant (i.e. independent of initial concentration).
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    (Original post by charco)
    With first order kinetics the half-life is constant (i.e. independent of initial concentration).
    Oh, so it would simply be 4200(s)/2 = 2100s <- half life
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    (Original post by Bloom77)
    Oh, so it would simply be 4200(s)/2 = 2100s <- half life
    The fact that the half-life changes with initial pressure suggests that it's not first order kinetics.

    I would explore second order.
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    (Original post by charco)
    The fact that the half-life changes with initial pressure suggests that it's not first order kinetics.

    I would explore second order.
    Thanks
    I thought pressure is synonymous with concentration in the gas phase which is why I assumed first order

    but how do you work out it's second order from the data
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    (Original post by Bloom77)
    Thanks
    I thought pressure is synonymous with concentration in the gas phase which is why I assumed first order

    but how do you work out it's second order from the data
    Yes, in the gas phase you can deal with pressures as if they are concentrations, but why does this lead you to believe that the process is first order?

    The evidence from half-lives is that it is not first order.
 
 
 
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