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Camembert baked in the box - have you done/eaten it? Watch

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    I've been thinking about this today...

    Having looked on the net, not sure which would be better...

    1. Sprinkled with chilli flakes, salt and pepper with a drizzle of olive oil before baking or...

    2. Make little incisions with a knife and insert some garlic and rosemary, topped with a drizzle of olive oil before baking...

    Also, I'm not sure if it would be better with an Italian ciabatta or a French baguette...

    And, toasted or plain - phew, it's turning into a big 'mass debate' deal (in my head) now...

    Any feedback on your experiences/thoughts appreciated - thanks
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    (Original post by Drez999)
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    Difficult! I feel your pain. I'd go with the first as I feel the garlic and rosemary may overpower the camberbert or generally make the whole thing too strong. And definitely toasted!
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Difficult! I feel your pain. I'd go with the first as I feel the garlic and rosemary may overpower the camberbert or generally make the whole thing too strong. And definitely toasted!
    Hmm, therein lies my problem - I am a garlic lover! (Single guy)

    If the garlic was cut into thin slivers do you think it would detract from the taste of the cheese?

    Thanks for your input
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    (Original post by Drez999)
    Hmm, therein lies my problem - I am a garlic lover! (Single guy)

    If the garlic was cut into thin slivers do you think it would detract from the taste of the cheese?

    Thanks for your input
    I think it depends on how much garlic you put in there rather than how big the slivers are as the garlic will hopefully permeate the cheese either way.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    I think it depends on how much garlic you put in there rather than how big the slivers are as the garlic will hopefully permeate the cheese either way.
    QED
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    Don't soil the perfect cheese with your unnatural additions.

    A simple fresh baguette will do.
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    First one sounds good. Although i found camembert a bit sickly and stinky

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    Ooh, with chilli flakes! I wouldn't add the salt and pepper though. Not a fan of salt myself, and the cheese doesn't need over-flavouring. Definitely want to try this though
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    (Original post by Drez999)
    I've been thinking about this today...

    Having looked on the net, not sure which would be better...

    1. Sprinkled with chilli flakes, salt and pepper with a drizzle of olive oil before baking or...

    2. Make little incisions with a knife and insert some garlic and rosemary, topped with a drizzle of olive oil before baking...

    Also, I'm not sure if it would be better with an Italian ciabatta or a French baguette...

    And, toasted or plain - phew, it's turning into a big 'mass debate' deal (in my head) now...

    Any feedback on your experiences/thoughts appreciated - thanks
    I think if you get a good quality camembert, rather than a supermarket quality one, you should just let the cheese speak for itself. Ciabatta would be totally wrong - a crusty baguette would be perfect. A good sparkling normandy cider or, even better, champagne is a perfect accompaniment.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    I think if you get a good quality camembert, rather than a supermarket quality one, you should just let the cheese speak for itself. Ciabatta would be totally wrong - a crusty baguette would be perfect. A good sparkling normandy cider or, even better, champagne is a perfect accompaniment.
    Champagne? That's both a little out of my league and budget!

    I am more likely to have a cloudy farm-produced scrumpy cider
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    (Original post by Drez999)
    Champagne? That's both a little out of my league and budget!

    I am more likely to have a cloudy farm-produced scrumpy cider
    Then treat yourself to some Old Rosie.
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    (Original post by Drez999)
    Champagne? That's both a little out of my league and budget!

    I am more likely to have a cloudy farm-produced scrumpy cider
    A cider will work just fine then (save the fizz for a special lunch). A good quality box-baked camembert, some good normandy cider (I sure Old Rosie would work as well) and crusty baguette is a great pleasure. Very simple, very elegant, not remotely fussy or elaborate and a great example of the harmony of terroir. I think I might have this for supper tomorrow.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    even better, champagne is a perfect accompaniment.
    Out of interest, what champagne would you go for?
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    (Original post by Meany Pie)
    Out of interest, what champagne would you go for?
    I think something a little bit 'biscuity' and certainly full. Maybe a NV Bollinger, or Billecart-Salmon. Possibly even a bog standard glass of the Widow.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    A cider will work just fine then (save the fizz for a special lunch). A good quality box-baked camembert, some good normandy cider (I sure Old Rosie would work as well) and crusty baguette is a great pleasure. Very simple, very elegant, not remotely fussy or elaborate and a great example of the harmony of terroir. I think I might have this for supper tomorrow.
    Hmm, now I am getting excited...

    If you do have it tomorrow please update on here as to the enjoyable rating and a picture if possible
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    I think if you get a good quality camembert, rather than a supermarket quality one, you should just let the cheese speak for itself. Ciabatta would be totally wrong - a crusty baguette would be perfect. A good sparkling normandy cider or, even better, champagne is a perfect accompaniment.
    Hmm why do you think ciabatta is wrong?
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    (Original post by Drez999)
    Hmm, now I am getting excited...

    If you do have it tomorrow please update on here as to the enjoyable rating and a picture if possible
    Yes, of course! This will be dependent on my finding a decent cheese to bake of course so maybe I'll have a little look in our local fromagerie or, failing that, Paxton and Whitfield.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    I think something a little bit 'biscuity' and certainly full. Maybe a NV Bollinger, or Billecart-Salmon. Possibly even a bog standard glass of the Widow.
    You are a classy gentleman with quite the booze budget :hat:

    I want to come to your parties
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    (Original post by Meany Pie)
    You are a classy gentleman with quite the booze budget :hat:

    I want to come to your parties
    They start elegantly and end debaucherously.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    Hmm why do you think ciabatta is wrong?
    1. Texture. The soft, airy texture of a good ciabatta just doesn't work with the melting texture of a baked camembert. There isn't enough contrast - hence why I think you need the sharp, crustiness of a fresh baguette.

    2. Ciabatta has far too much of a pronounced olive oil taste (or at least it should have) which jars with the camembert flavour and detracts from it. The baguette is neutral by comparison.
 
 
 
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