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    (Original post by 04MR17)
    Please.
    Hmm. If you assume the wrong thing then your conclusion will be wrong. There's one mark gone. If they're nasty, they'll eliminate your induction from the point when you substitute f(k) and give you a mark for factorising and that's it. If not, then you've only lost one. There is no direct mark given for assumption.Grey area I'm afraid.Depends where you went wrong.
    Possibly.
    My weekend job.
    Hmm, not sure. I'd say 0 since the A1 depends on the M1 and the M1 will probably state correct.
    2 marks for correct differentiation. 1 mark for application of formula, 1 mark for correct application, 1 mark for answer. You should get 3/5
    I'll let you know when I get the paper. Which should be toorrow or Monday.
    Please keep your strongest opinions to yourself and out of my thread. Thanks a million.They are trying to trip you up, and it looks very contrived.This should not be penalised. It isn't normally.
    Really helpful for my detailed mark scheme writing. Thanks.That's my weekend job.
    :ta:
    Here you go.
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  1. File Type: pdf FP1 May 2017 worked answers.pdf (269.1 KB, 37 views)
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    (Original post by Reesharr)
    Here you go.
    Epic.:yy:
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    i reckon i've got 64 marks. do you think that'll be an A for this paper?
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    I kinda ran out of time in the end... I got 19(3^...)+8f(k), but the working was very messy because I rushed through. Also, I had to write a very sloppy conclusion: "True for f(k) and true for f(k+1). Also true for f(1) so true for n∈Z+." I really hope they don't mind the messiness....
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    (Original post by PlumPie)
    I kinda ran out of time in the end... I got 19(3^...)+8f(k), but the working was very messy because I rushed through. Also, I had to write a very sloppy conclusion: "True for f(k) and true for f(k+1). Also true for f(1) so true for n∈Z+." I really hope they don't mind the messiness....
    It's not really a case of minding messiness. Put yourself in the position of the examiner (and I hope your teacher has explained this as part of preparing you for exams): your scanned paper is flashed up on his/her computer screen and he/she has 30 secs to a minute to mark a question. Can he/she decipher what you've written sufficiently in the time to give you the marks?

    I suspect that a lot of requests for remarking papers relate to students who haven't grasped that they are communicating their knowledge to the examiner and that if the communication is garbled, the examiner may, even with the best will in the world, not award the marks which might be due.

    I'm not saying this is the case for you: I realise you were in a rush to finish. But the examiner is still in the difficult position of having to make quick decisions which may not work in your favour.
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    How does error carried forward work? I screwed up the first question by misreading the equation to have a + instead of a - infront of the the 4/x^2, and subsequently got everything wrong in that question. How many marks will I get?
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    Can you add me to this list thanks
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    (Original post by b0bzzta)
    Have you got any advice on how to prepare for step papers? I'll be doing fp2 and fp3 next year so I'll learn the pure content but do you think its worth investing in one of those £1000 step courses?

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    As I said above, STEP is much more about problem-solving than raw knowledge. So it sounds like you'll have way more knowledge than required, but do you know how to apply that knowledge in different ways to types of questions that you might not previously encountered?

    So, as another member of this thread said, it's about working through lots of STEP-type problems and developing the ability to look at them from several different angles to spot how to solve them.

    You need to move from a "bull in a china shop" mentality of rushing into problems to one where you spend time contemplating the problem before you decide on a course of action. I encourage this with my students as a matter of course. While I ask "How would you tackle this problem?" like other teachers I expect back a helicopter-style answer which says "This is the kind of approach I would adopt" and not a load of low-level algebraic gibberish.

    It's very difficult to move students into this style of thinking after "teach-to-the-test" GCSE, but once they get it they become hugely more enthusiastic for maths. And it's exactly the mentality Oxford, Cambridge and other top rank unis look for.
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    (Original post by 20XX Fox)
    How does error carried forward work? I screwed up the first question by misreading the equation to have a + instead of a - infront of the the 4/x^2, and subsequently got everything wrong in that question. How many marks will I get?
    In the part of the question where you made the mistake you can pick up M1 marks and possibly B1/A1 marks if these are awarded for parts of an answer eg parts of an integration.

    In subsequent parts of a question you can get marks where the answer from an earlier part is shown in quotes or where the mark scheme puts "their answer from part (a)" but you will in most cases lose any final accuracy marks - but not always eg it is possible to see an A1ft which means you do get the mark where you've used the correct method but based on a wrong answer from earlier. That's an examiner's nightmare as you have to check whether the answer is correct with the student's earlier wrong answer.
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    (Original post by Reesharr)
    As I said above, STEP is much more about problem-solving than raw knowledge. So it sounds like you'll have way more knowledge than required, but do you know how to apply that knowledge in different ways to types of questions that you might not previously encountered?

    So, as another member of this thread said, it's about working through lots of STEP-type problems and developing the ability to look at them from several different angles to spot how to solve them.

    You need to move from a "bull in a china shop" mentality of rushing into problems to one where you spend time contemplating the problem before you decide on a course of action. I encourage this with my students as a matter of course. While I ask "How would you tackle this problem?" like other teachers I expect back a helicopter-style answer which says "This is the kind of approach I would adopt" and not a load of low-level algebraic gibberish.

    It's very difficult to move students into this style of thinking after "teach-to-the-test" GCSE, but once they get it they become hugely more enthusiastic for maths. And it's exactly the mentality Oxford, Cambridge and other top rank unis look for.
    Ah okay, so its kinda like hard maths challenge?


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    (Original post by b0bzzta)
    Ah okay, so its kinda like hard maths challenge?

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    Exactly. But with an A-level knowledge base.
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    Don't buy into one of the big courses until you've got your offer. One of the £60 AEA or MAT courses at Oxford/Imperial/Warwick are better suited to those who are preparing for interview. It's always worth doing STEP I and II as well as AEA in your own time, as these will help build your confidence with problem solving, more so than STEP due to STEP being infernally difficult (at times). It's worth doing FP2 and FP3 before even thinking about STEP III, and begin to increase the amount of STEP you're doing as you progress through year 13. I've done A level maths a year early, and still struggle with STEP II somewhat: my teacher said it's still only worth starting serious STEP preparation until you've covered most of FP2 and FP3, so you'd be better off doing AEA to prepare for interview. Most people at the open day who got in said they prepared for interview doing nothing harder than STEP I. Don't waste your £1000 on STEP, buy a load of Freddos instead.

    Edit: if you're one of the lucky fu - people whose school runs a STEP support program, even less reason to burn your money on STEP preparation.
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    Looking at the model answers, I think I might have got 72/75 if my proofs are good enough! I was never completely confident with these, but I think they went well in the exam
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    The first question was the only place I dropped marks. Let's see if i can still get 100 UMS, though not looking likely.
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    (Original post by 20XX Fox)
    Don't buy into one of the big courses until you've got your offer. One of the £60 AEA or MAT courses at Oxford/Imperial/Warwick are better suited to those who are preparing for interview. It's always worth doing STEP I and II as well as AEA in your own time, as these will help build your confidence with problem solving, more so than STEP due to STEP being infernally difficult (at times). It's worth doing FP2 and FP3 before even thinking about STEP III, and begin to increase the amount of STEP you're doing as you progress through year 13. I've done A level maths a year early, and still struggle with STEP II somewhat: my teacher said it's still only worth starting serious STEP preparation until you've covered most of FP2 and FP3, so you'd be better off doing AEA to prepare for interview. Most people at the open day who got in said they prepared for interview doing nothing harder than STEP I. Don't waste your £1000 on STEP, buy a load of Freddos instead.

    Edit: if you're one of the lucky fu - people whose school runs a STEP support program, even less reason to burn your money on STEP preparation.
    Realistically I don't even have £1000 😂😭. I'm doing fp2 and 3 next year and my school doesn't help step preparation :/. Thanks for the advice


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    (Original post by k.russell)
    You have to test n=1 and n=2, assume it's true for n = k and n = k + 1 then test if it's true for n = k + 2
    Do you not also have to test it for n = 3?
    I tested it for only n = 1 and n =2 which is why I'm worried that I might drop a mark.
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    (Original post by lordrohan731)
    Do you not also have to test it for n = 3?
    I tested it for only n = 1 and n =2 which is why I'm worried that I might drop a mark.
    no, you test for the first 2 numbers. You then assumes it's true for n = k and n = k + 1. The next step is to prove it's true for k + 2, whenever it's true for k and k + 1, using the recurrence relationship. Once you have shown this, let k = 1 and you can see that it's true for all n (belonging to the set of positive integers) because if it's true for n = 1 and n = 2, it's true for n = 3. So it's true for 2 & 3 therefore it's true for 4 and so on ad infinitum
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    (Original post by lordrohan731)
    Do you not also have to test it for n = 3?
    I tested it for only n = 1 and n =2 which is why I'm worried that I might drop a mark.
    I did exactly the same (only testing it for n=1 and n=2). From what I've heard I believe it's more correct to also test for n = 3, however you probably won't lost a mark. For instance, on 'standard' questions like these when assuming for n=k and proving for n=k+1, it is better to also prove for n=1 and n=2 but the mark scheme doesn't dock you a point (and I have never been taught to test for n=2) if you only test for n=1. Correct me if I'm wrong - I'm sure there are far more able mathematicians out there able to answer you better
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    oh
    (Original post by b0bzzta)
    Area of image = modulus of the determinant X area of object

    I'm assuming you got to |2a+9|=18

    Now since the modulus of a number a
    Can represent the positive or negative number u have to solve 2 equations
    Eq 1: 2a+9 =18
    Eq 2: -(2a+9)=18
    Eq 1 gives you a=9/2
    Eq 2 gives u a=-27/2

    Oh wow thank you, my teacher had only taught me the positive way so i only had one solution (9/2). How did you know that equaton 2 was -(2a+9)


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    (Original post by k.russell)
    no, you test for the first 2 numbers. You then assumes it's true for n = k and n = k + 1. The next step is to prove it's true for k + 2, whenever it's true for k and k + 1, using the recurrence relationship. Once you have shown this, let k = 1 and you can see that it's true for all n (belonging to the set of positive integers) because if it's true for n = 1 and n = 2, it's true for n = 3. So it's true for 2 & 3 therefore it's true for 4 and so on ad infinitum
    That's what I thought but my teacher said that you should have shown it true for n = 3 and said I could lose a mark. Do you think I would lose a mark? A bit worried because I was hoping to get 100 ums.
 
 
 
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