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AQA GCSE Geography A Official Thread Watch

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    (Original post by JMR2017)
    So the your overall grade boundary is the average of the two papers?
    E.G if an A* for physical is 50 and the A* for human in 60, then the overall A* boundary would be 55?
    No its the UMS added up (along with your coursework). You need 360/400 UMS for an A*. So if you get 150 UMS (around aout 60-65 marks) in the physical paper and around 90 UMS in the coursework, then you can still get a middle A and end up with an A* overall. So basically, do REALLY well in the physical paper and relatively well in the human and you have your A*
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    (Original post by Samanthaplague)
    No its the UMS added up (along with your coursework). You need 360/400 UMS for an A*. So if you get 150 UMS (around aout 60-65 marks) in the physical paper and around 90 UMS in the coursework, then you can still get a middle A and end up with an A* overall. So basically, do REALLY well in the physical paper and relatively well in the human and you have your A*
    Oh OK. I only do AQA for this subject so I am not very familiar with how it works.
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    (Original post by JMR2017)
    Oh OK. I only do AQA for this subject so I am not very familiar with how it works.
    I am also doing to AQA specification. This is the link to the UMS grade boundaries

    http://store.aqa.org.uk/over/stat_pd...BOUNDARIES.PDF
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    (Original post by JMR2017)
    I don't do Coasts so I cannot give you a proper explanation, but for 4 mark questions it is marked in 2 levels, level one and level 2. To get 4 marks you have to make two points and explain them (in this question it seems like they have set the question up so you do this). Since you have been given 2 marks (which is in level one) I guess it means you have not elaborated enough and explained you points fully. So my advice would be to try and explain your points (i.e use because... this means...) as much as possible.
    Thanks a lot x


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    Can someone help me on this question Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1495221927.965261.jpg
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    (Original post by Samanthaplague)
    I am also doing to AQA specification. This is the link to the UMS grade boundaries

    http://store.aqa.org.uk/over/stat_pd...BOUNDARIES.PDF
    How do you work out the UMS?
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    (Original post by XxxvatxxX)
    Anyone got any Ice On Land predictions??
    Hi,

    My teacher has predicted these will come up:

    Ice on the Land- Budget- Drumlins- Corries/ erosion landforms- Processes- Chamonix - sustainable- Adapting to climate change


    Good luck on monday- hope that helps!
    D
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    (Original post by JMR2017)
    How do you work out the UMS?
    Type in "AQA UMS converter" into the search tab and then click on the first option and then select the year and the subject paper and then type in the mark and it will show you a graph and will tell you the UMS mark
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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Can someone help me on this question Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1495221927.965261.jpg
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    Slumping is when the soil becomes waterlogged and gives way under its own weight.
    Waves enter and smash into the soft clay cliffs
    As clay is impermeable, it will absorb the water and thus will become waterlogged.
    This increases the weight of the clay and causes it to give way under its own weight and therefore slump
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    Is anyone doing rocks as a topic because i am so confused
    When granite is chemically weathered to form a tor, the textbook says warm and wet conditions for it to happen, but I don’t really understand what this means? Also, I don’t understand how the granite can be weathered underground if it is not permeable.
    Also, do granite, chalk and limestone all have joints? Are they horizontal joints called bedding planes only in limestone? If granite has joints why is it not permeable, because don’t the bedding planes in limestone make it permeable?

    If anyone knows the answers it would really help me out thanks xxx
    sorry there is a lot there but the exam is on monday soo.......
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    (Original post by Samanthaplague)
    No its the UMS added up (along with your coursework). You need 360/400 UMS for an A*. So if you get 150 UMS (around aout 60-65 marks) in the physical paper and around 90 UMS in the coursework, then you can still get a middle A and end up with an A* overall. So basically, do REALLY well in the physical paper and relatively well in the human and you have your A*

    Hi, I also want an A*, although I only got an A in CW. (52/60)
    What should I be aiming for so that I can get an A star? If it is even possible that is?
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    (Original post by AhmarIT)
    Hi, I also want an A*, although I only got an A in CW. (52/60)
    What should I be aiming for so that I can get an A star? If it is even possible that is?
    Your Coursework was 88 UMS and this means that you need to get borderline A*s in the paper to get an A* overall so you can get an A* pretty easily.
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    (Original post by Westsidegirl)
    Is anyone doing rocks as a topic because i am so confused
    When granite is chemically weathered to form a tor, the textbook says warm and wet conditions for it to happen, but I don’t really understand what this means? Also, I don’t understand how the granite can be weathered underground if it is not permeable.
    Also, do granite, chalk and limestone all have joints? Are they horizontal joints called bedding planes only in limestone? If granite has joints why is it not permeable, because don’t the bedding planes in limestone make it permeable?

    If anyone knows the answers it would really help me out thanks xxx
    sorry there is a lot there but the exam is on monday soo.......
    Granite weathering is REALLY slow and the joints come from the pressure because the rock is continually stretched or squeezed. You don't need to know how joints are formed do you??
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    (Original post by Cameron_Brown)
    I'm doing Restless Earth, Water on the Land and The Coastal Zone.

    Restless Earth predictions: Differences between shield and composite volcanoes, formation of a super volcano, some graphs on tsunamis. The case study will probably be either effects or responses of/to a tsunami or the effects or responses of/to a volcanic eruption

    Water on the Land predictions: Transportation processes, labeling landforms on a river, working with hydrographs, factors that influence lag time and river discharge, formation of either levees or a floodplain. The case study could be evaluating dam/reservoir construction

    The Coastal Zone predictions: Weathering and mass movement, diagram to show the process of longshore drift, formation of a depositional landform (spit, bar or tombolo). The case study could be cliff collapse or there could be an eight marker on hard and soft engineering strategies which protect the coast.
    Formation of a super volcano is not on our spec, so we can not get asked about it.
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    (Original post by Jeevs090909)
    Formation of a super volcano is not on our spec, so we can not get asked about it.
    I thought it was, is it not?
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    (Original post by JMR2017)
    I thought it was, is it not?
    I'm sure it's on the AQA specification.
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    (Original post by Cameron_Brown)
    I'm sure it's on the AQA specification.
    yeah i'm sure it is part of aqa spec..
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    (Original post by Samanthaplague)
    Your Coursework was 88 UMS and this means that you need to get borderline A*s in the paper to get an A* overall so you can get an A* pretty easily.
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Cameron_Brown)
    I'm sure it's on the AQA specification.
    Dint hink jt is
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    (Original post by amaster22)
    yeah i'm sure it is part of aqa spec..

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bwo...w?usp=drivesdk

    Only need to know effects and charectistics
 
 
 
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