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    Why and how do short sentences create a happy atmosphere?
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    In general, they do not. You'd need to substantiate this idea with reference to positive language which, in combination to curtailed sentences, may create a jubilant atmosphere.
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    (Original post by CandidateZero)
    In general, they do not. You'd need to substantiate this idea with reference to positive language which, in combination to curtailed sentences, may create a jubilant atmosphere.
    This is an extract from A Christmas Carol where Scrooge has finished his appointments with all spirits:
    `What's to-day, my fine fellow.' said Scrooge.

    `To-day.' replied the boy. `Why, Christmas Day.'

    `It's Christmas Day.' said Scrooge to himself. `I haven't missed it. The Spirits have done it all in one night. They can do anything they like. Of course they can. Of course they can. Hallo, my fine fellow.'

    `Hallo.' returned the boy.

    `Do you know the Poulterer's, in the next street but one, at the corner.' Scrooge inquired.

    `I should hope I did,' replied the lad.

    `An intelligent boy.' said Scrooge. `A remarkable boy. Do you know whether they've sold the prize Turkey that was hanging up there -- Not the little prize Turkey: the big one.'

    AS OPPOSE TO:
    'What's Christmastime to you but a time for paying bills without money; a time for finding yourself a year older, and not an hour richer; a time for balancing your books, and having every item in 'em through a dozen of months presented dead against you?'

    The atmosphere is different but how can i explain this through diction choice and sentence structure and make a valid point?
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    Ah, okay.

    In the early novella, we see Scrooge attempt to justify why Fred should not shoulder the Christmas spirit, almost educating him, and we see his pour of this discontentment through Dickens' use of long sentences to reflect on this idea. Dickens' choice of diction is significant here: Scrooge juxtaposes wealth with age and time, and Scrooge possibly realises that Fred is at the age to choose between Christmas to find himself 'not an hour richer', or to persue wealth.

    In Stave 5, Dickens's use of short sentences in Scrooge's dialogue reflects on the fact that he now understands his place in society. One may argue that the Christmas spirits, which 'scared Scrooge to the very marrow of his bones', have forced Scrooge into understanding this viewpoint. So happy and grateful is Scrooge for life, Dickens' use of short sentences may also reflect the fact that Scrooge may never comprehend the ghostly visitations, but take the experience as a means to focus on bettering himself in life.
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    (Original post by CandidateZero)
    Ah, okay.

    In the early novella, we see Scrooge attempt to justify why Fred should not shoulder the Christmas spirit, almost educating him, and we see his pour of this discontentment through Dickens' use of long sentences to reflect on this idea. Dickens' choice of diction is significant here: Scrooge juxtaposes wealth with age and time, and Scrooge possibly realises that Fred is at the age to choose between Christmas to find himself 'not an hour richer', or to persue wealth.

    In Stave 5, Dickens's use of short sentences in Scrooge's dialogue reflects on the fact that he now understands his place in society. One may argue that the Christmas spirits, which 'scared Scrooge to the very marrow of his bones', have forced Scrooge into understanding this viewpoint. So happy and grateful is Scrooge for life, Dickens' use of short sentences may also reflect the fact that Scrooge may never comprehend the ghostly visitations, but take the experience as a means to focus on bettering himself in life.
    That's perfect, thanks!
 
 
 
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