JoePayne1
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hi, I'm joe and ive applied to do earth sciences with a foundation year at Plymouth but I have some questions I thought someone doing the course I applied for could answer. essentially I was wondering what exactly you learn because ive read he modules on their website and been to an open day. but I still don't fully understand exactly what I would be dong day to day and term to term. one problem for me is I love natural hazards like volcanoes earthquakes tsunamis etc, and also formation of mountains and plate tectonics. but when I tell someone I'm going to do geology they say "oh so you like rocks" which keeps throwing me off because now I'm worried all I will learn about is different rocks which not something I'm as interested in. also what are your main interests in the course. apologies for grammar I'm panicking a lot rn as I also don't have much time and exams coming. thank you
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(Original post by JoePayne1)
hi, I'm joe and ive applied to do earth sciences with a foundation year at Plymouth but I have some questions I thought someone doing the course I applied for could answer. essentially I was wondering what exactly you learn because ive read he modules on their website and been to an open day. but I still don't fully understand exactly what I would be dong day to day and term to term. one problem for me is I love natural hazards like volcanoes earthquakes tsunamis etc, and also formation of mountains and plate tectonics. but when I tell someone I'm going to do geology they say "oh so you like rocks" which keeps throwing me off because now I'm worried all I will learn about is different rocks which not something I'm as interested in. also what are your main interests in the course. apologies for grammar I'm panicking a lot rn as I also don't have much time and exams coming. thank you
Basic mineralogy/rock identification is part of every geology course. You need to be able to identify rock types (and mineral types) so that you can tie that back to the environment they were formed in...particularly as part of any field work. It's probably going to take up 1 or 2 of your first year modules (along with basic geological mapping and field work introductions...and you might have to do some palaeo too (yuk! - trust me you can get through a geology degree without doing too much palaeo - I did 2 modules in total)).

It can be a bit boring but it's not difficult and it's very useful once you get onto later work. Being able to work out frequency of natural hazards by looking at the geological record of an area makes it possible to understand how likely a future event is. Understanding the way plate tectonics is visible in the geology of an area can help tying together specific geological events.

It's not "liking rocks" with no purpose - it's about being able to identify different rock types so that you can build a history of a place or see patterns in how things have changed or look at a geological map and build up a bigger picture. And universities know that students start without a background in this so they'll make sure you're given all the information you need.
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