JoePayne1
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hi, I'm joe and ive applied to do earth sciences with a foundation year at Plymouth but I have some questions I thought someone doing the course I applied for could answer. essentially I was wondering what exactly you learn because ive read he modules on their website and been to an open day. but I still don't fully understand exactly what I would be dong day to day and term to term. one problem for me is I love natural hazards like volcanoes earthquakes tsunamis etc, and also formation of mountains and plate tectonics. but when I tell someone I'm going to do geology they say "oh so you like rocks" which keeps throwing me off because now I'm worried all I will learn about is different rocks which not something I'm as interested in. also what are your main interests in the course. apologies for grammar I'm panicking a lot rn as I also don't have much time and exams coming. thank you
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Friffinghell
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(Original post by JoePayne1)
hi, I'm joe and ive applied to do earth sciences with a foundation year at Plymouth but I have some questions I thought someone doing the course I applied for could answer. essentially I was wondering what exactly you learn because ive read he modules on their website and been to an open day. but I still don't fully understand exactly what I would be dong day to day and term to term. one problem for me is I love natural hazards like volcanoes earthquakes tsunamis etc, and also formation of mountains and plate tectonics. but when I tell someone I'm going to do geology they say "oh so you like rocks" which keeps throwing me off because now I'm worried all I will learn about is different rocks which not something I'm as interested in. also what are your main interests in the course. apologies for grammar I'm panicking a lot rn as I also don't have much time and exams coming. thank you
If you've had a look at the course modules you will find it is very varied.

  • GEOL1001The Dynamic Earth
  • GEOL1002Earth Materials
  • GEOL1003Geosystems
  • GEOL1004Palaeontology and Stratigraphy
  • GEOL1005Geological Maps and Structural Geology


Optional Modules
  • GEES1001PPNatural Hazards
  • GEES1002PPClimate Change and Energy
  • GEES1003PPSustainable Futures
  • OS106PPOur Ocean Planet
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JP1001
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yeah I saw modules on loads of uni websites that sound good but I cant tell if I'm interested in what they say they will teach me because the paragraphs often are vague to an extent, they don't give examples of work and I cant get much info from on para. if anyone reading this does have any examples of work they do in geology or what they learn I would appreciate it if you could send it to me. thanks to anyone who can help me here.

also this is the same person who asked the first Q but im using a different account.
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Friffinghell
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(Original post by JP1001)
yeah I saw modules on loads of uni websites that sound good but I cant tell if I'm interested in what they say they will teach me because the paragraphs often are vague to an extent, they don't give examples of work and I cant get much info from on para. if anyone reading this does have any examples of work they do in geology or what they learn I would appreciate it if you could send it to me. thanks to anyone who can help me here.

also this is the same person who asked the first Q but im using a different account.
There's usually a mixture of lab based work, group work, debate, project work and lectures.

it would be impossible to list all the things learned in geology. The paragraphs are quite good summaries.

Maybe visit an Open Day and direct your questions towards the dept?
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JP1001
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(Original post by Friffinghell)
There's usually a mixture of lab based work, group work, debate, project work and lectures.

it would be impossible to list all the things learned in geology. The paragraphs are quite good summaries.

Maybe visit an Open Day and direct your questions towards the dept?
yeah i went to an open day and read the summaries i just didnt get a good understanding of the examples of work they could do. im overreacting its just nervewracking. thanks for your answer it was helpful.
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hezzlington
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(Original post by JoePayne1)
hi, I'm joe and ive applied to do earth sciences with a foundation year at Plymouth but I have some questions I thought someone doing the course I applied for could answer. essentially I was wondering what exactly you learn because ive read he modules on their website and been to an open day. but I still don't fully understand exactly what I would be dong day to day and term to term. one problem for me is I love natural hazards like volcanoes earthquakes tsunamis etc, and also formation of mountains and plate tectonics. but when I tell someone I'm going to do geology they say "oh so you like rocks" which keeps throwing me off because now I'm worried all I will learn about is different rocks which not something I'm as interested in. also what are your main interests in the course. apologies for grammar I'm panicking a lot rn as I also don't have much time and exams coming. thank you
Hi Joe,

You really are on the wrong course if you don't want to study rocks. That's the bulk of what Earth sciences are about.

I'd consider taking these courses:

http://www.port.ac.uk/courses/geogra...ards/#overview

or

Geophysics (geology) or (physics)

I studied geophysics at Liverpool and my final exam was literally called 'volcanoes, earthquakes, tsunamis'. If you opt for the Geophysics (Physics) course, you'll study earthquakes, orogeny (mountain building), lots of plate tectonics and can tailor the degree to your interests.

You need to be doing physics/a level maths.

Studying and understanding earthquakes properly requires strong mathematical skills; you'd cover the basics from Snells' Law, the different types of earthquake waves and how they propagate through the earth as an isotropic body, to much more complex stuff such as anisotropy, an applied form of the 3D wave equation, moment tensors, deformation etc.

I was lucky enough to be taught by a Volcano Seismologist (held senior position at the Montserrat Observatory.) and volcanoes are so awesome, and like you I hated studying rocks so luckily this module focused purely on the seismology/deformation of volcanoes.

Unfortunately, you'll need to study some rocks at some point, you just have to. Pick a geophysics degree if you want to keep it to a minimum and have strong maths skills.
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