Aqa macroeconomics **official ** as unofficial mark scheme Watch

coreHelp
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#1
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How did the exam go? Let's start the unofficial mark scheme hereeeeeeee

Context 2

Def:
Trade deficit of G n S

Data Comparison:

Diagram:
Leftward shift of SRAS

Calculation:
-3.28 or something

10 marker:
Factors causing low productivity

25 marker:
Policy to reduce trade deficit
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Gxurg
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For the diagram what did u shift as or ad
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Gxurg
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What did u write for ten maker
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coreHelp
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(Original post by Gxurg)
What did u write for ten maker
I spoke about the fact the EU is struggling with their recovery which would mean that they wouldnt necessarily import from UK which would mean production will fall leading to more spare capacity. In this way, not all the resources r employed efficiently leading to low productivity as the economy is working within the PPF.

Also, the UK has issues with the manufacturing side of things due to exporting more services than goods. This is because of the decline in ship building and metal productions. This has lead to structural unemployment leading to occupational immobility of labour. Unemployment means that factor of production are again not utilised to the fullest, as labour is a f.o.p leading to productivity, as the economy is again working within the PPF.
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ertwertwertwe
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shift as left
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coreHelp
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(Original post by Gxurg)
For the diagram what did u shift as or ad
AS, since it was a cost of production. In fact, SRAS
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Cheesemasters
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who has mark scheme for context 1?
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coreHelp
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(Original post by Cheesemasters)
who has mark scheme for context 1?

its in the other tread, but really neither of the two threads are active this time around. edexcel already got 500+ replies.. not sure where the aqa kids disappeared tbh
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keynes24
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(Original post by coreHelp)
I spoke about the fact the EU is struggling with their recovery which would mean that they wouldnt necessarily import from UK which would mean production will fall leading to more spare capacity. In this way, not all the resources r employed efficiently leading to low productivity as the economy is working within the PPF.

Also, the UK has issues with the manufacturing side of things due to exporting more services than goods. This is because of the decline in ship building and metal productions. This has lead to structural unemployment leading to occupational immobility of labour. Unemployment means that factor of production are again not utilised to the fullest, as labour is a f.o.p leading to productivity, as the economy is again working within the PPF.
Not using all resources efficiently is not an indication of low productivity but spare capacity
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karunvsn
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(Original post by Gxurg)
What did u write for ten maker
I talked about how the labour force could be unskilled which results in a decrease in productivity, this could be derived from a lack of government spending on supply side policies such as education and training.

Second point of mine is a bit crap but I said how there is factor and geographical immobility which can create long commute times and distances for the labour force which reduces their welfare causing a decrease in productivity, again resulting from a lack of government spending on supply side policies but this time a lack of spending on transportation links rather than education
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coreHelp
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(Original post by keynes24)
Not using all resources efficiently is not an indication of low productivity but spare capacity

  • Capacity utilisation. In a boom, firms may squeeze more output out of existing capacity through encouraging people to work overtime – this increases labour productivity. In a recession, firms may hold onto workers, rather than let them go – even if they are just working at 80% capacity – therefore labour productivity falls.
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coreHelp
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(Original post by keynes24)
Not using all resources efficiently is not an indication of low productivity but spare capacity
Economic productivity will depend also on pricing and demand. If consumers require less products than potentially producible, plants will not work at full productive capacity. Thus economic productivity can well fall, as with decreasing demand and prices.
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coreHelp
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(Original post by karunvsn)
I talked about how the labour force could be unskilled which results in a decrease in productivity, this could be derived from a lack of government spending on supply side policies such as education and training.

Second point of mine is a bit crap but I said how there is factor and geographical immobility which can create long commute times and distances for the labour force which reduces their welfare causing a decrease in productivity, again resulting from a lack of government spending on supply side policies but this time a lack of spending on transportation links rather than education
so we kinda have spoken about the same things right ?

I spoke about the fact the EU is struggling with their recovery which would mean that they wouldnt necessarily import from UK which would mean production will fall leading to more spare capacity. In this way, not all the resources r employed efficiently leading to low productivity as the economy is working within the PPF.

Also, the UK has issues with the manufacturing side of things due to exporting more services than goods. This is because of the decline in ship building and metal productions. This has lead to structural unemployment leading to occupational immobility of labour. Unemployment means that factor of production are again not utilised to the fullest, as labour is a f.o.p leading to productivity, as the economy is again working within the PPF.
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keynes24
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(Original post by coreHelp)
  • Capacity utilisation. In a boom, firms may squeeze more output out of existing capacity through encouraging people to work overtime – this increases labour productivity. In a recession, firms may hold onto workers, rather than let them go – even if they are just working at 80% capacity – therefore labour productivity falls.
I think you are confusing production with productivity. Unless there is some sort of performance target or performance related pay it wouldn't lead to greater productivity
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keynes24
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(Original post by coreHelp)
Economic productivity will depend also on pricing and demand. If consumers require less products than potentially producible, plants will not work at full productive capacity. Thus economic productivity can well fall, as with decreasing demand and prices.
I could be very productive at manufacturing a product and that wouldn't depend on demand. Not working at full capacity does not guarantee a fall in productivity. If you mention a rise in spare capacity or less demand you wouldn't get any marks.
If you mention that unemployed workers may lose their skills over time due to long term unemployment and that could cause a fall in productivity , then does another matter
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coreHelp
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(Original post by keynes24)
I could be very productive at manufacturing a product and that wouldn't depend on demand. Not working at full capacity does not guarantee a fall in productivity. If you mention a rise in spare capacity or less demand you wouldn't get any marks.
If you mention that unemployed workers may lose their skills over time due to long term unemployment and that could cause a fall in productivity , then does another matter
Indeed, I've spoken about structural unemployment, which is caused by immobility of labour, especially occupational lacking in skills. - Hysteresis
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sparklegirl123
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would u not shift as to the right because it said that energy prices rose so firms would increase supply to profit maximise thats what many of us had done
(Original post by coreHelp)
AS, since it was a cost of production. In fact, SRAS
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coreHelp
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(Original post by sparklegirl123)
would u not shift as to the right because it said that energy prices rose so firms would increase supply to profit maximise thats what many of us had done
ehh not really .. i think u r thinking micro .. in macro at least, energy costs are a cost of production which makes it more expensive to produce goods and services.. + if they make their goods more expensive the consumers will demand less, resulting in supply falling anyways

- so it will be a left wards shift of SRAS
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coreHelp
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Data comparison, have u guys used negative digits to describe the changes between goods n services ..
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fcahhoiwm
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For the 10 marker context B, could you talk about less immigration and less investment in education and training as a reason for low productivity?

And for the comparison question, as the balance of trade of goods is negative do you use the biggest bar or the smallest bar (do you use the biggest magnitude of trade of goods or smallest magnitude) for high point low point
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