FieryMoonlight
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What a nightmare! Honestly that paper was horrible. Here is me sitting doing past papers, and what comes up? Dragon instruments and balls. Worst thing is that the 2 markers were did not follow the same trend as the others papers. The equations were okay - who am I even kidding?
Any who did you guys find the paper?
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stephen1011
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Not bad, but i did expect a triangulation question tho
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Moody Communist
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It was a very nice paper for those who studied additional and extension units physics. However for those doing only single or double award some questions could have been challenging such as the gamma-ray question.

Completely understand where you're coming from though. I think the grade boundaries will be quite low this year for P1 considering many students appear to have struggled with the paper.
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stephen1011
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(Original post by Moody Communist)
It was a very nice paper for those who studied additional and extension units physics. However for those doing only single or double award some questions could have been challenging such as the gamma-ray question.

Completely understand where you're coming from though. I think the grade boundaries will be quite low this year for P1 considering many students appear to have struggled with the paper.
No because none of the year 10s did this paper as they are doing 9-1, so the grade boundries are gonna be high
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FieryMoonlight
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The gamma ray question was a little random. Me and my friends are doing triple, so we were fairly shocked when the gamma ray question came up - normally topics you cover in P3. We all wrote about the same thing - annhialation of antimatter- yet teacher did say it was wrong - gamma rays are produced from an unstable nuclei...
But it edexcel was unfair, to bring a topic that is so briefly mentioned in the book as a question. Those mere two marks could me a difference between a Grade A and B.
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FieryMoonlight
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(Original post by stephen1011)
No because none of the year 10s did this paper as they are doing 9-1, so the grade boundries are gonna be high
Yet again, maybe the grade boundries would be ridiculously low, as many may have found it harder - whether they are doing foundation or higher
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Moody Communist
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(Original post by stephen1011)
No because none of the year 10s did this paper as they are doing 9-1, so the grade boundries are gonna be high
The boundaries won't be high. They decide on the boundaries by looking at mean scores and variation between scores of people who sat the paper. If the general proportion of people found the paper difficult, the boundaries will be low. It has nothing to do with the 9-1.
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Moody Communist
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(Original post by FieryMoonlight)
The gamma ray question was a little random. Me and my friends are doing triple, so we were fairly shocked when the gamma ray question came up - normally topics you cover in P3. We all wrote about the same thing - annhialation of antimatter- yet teacher did say it was wrong - gamma rays are produced from an unstable nuclei...
But it edexcel was unfair, to bring a topic that is so briefly mentioned in the book as a question. Those mere two marks could me a difference between a Grade A and B.
Edexcel were completely out of order to include that, I agree.

I do however think that the board will accept 'annihilation' (of a positron and it's anti-matter counterpart / electron etcetera) or radioactive decay since they're both scientifically correct.
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therealbbysaff
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(Original post by Moody Communist)
Edexcel were completely out of order to include that, I agree.

I do however think that the board will accept 'annihilation' (of a positron and it's anti-matter counterpart / electron etcetera) or radioactive decay since they're both scientifically correct.
they wont expect annihilation thats p3, they dont include things in the mark scheme from out of the unit, it was unstable nuceli and gamma-radiation occurring naturally in some materials like radium
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Moody Communist
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(Original post by therealbbysaff)
they wont expect annihilation thats p3, they dont include things in the mark scheme from out of the unit, it was unstable nuceli and gamma-radiation occurring naturally in some materials like radium
Nuclear decay is not in the P1 specification either.

I have been told and it's pretty clear that either answers are acceptable.

Nuclear decay is for P2 and P3.

I have already spoken to a bundle of teachers and lecturers and they have agreed that annihilation AND decay will be accepted.
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therealbbysaff
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(Original post by Moody Communist)
Nuclear decay is not in the P1 specification either.

I have been told and it's pretty clear that either answers are acceptable.

Nuclear decay is for P2 and P3.

I have already spoken to a bundle of teachers and lecturers and they have agreed that annihilation AND decay will be accepted.
but thats just not right though is it because it really is in the spec and its in topic 1 under ionising radiation
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Moody Communist
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(Original post by therealbbysaff)
but thats just not right though is it because it really is in the spec and its in topic 1 under ionising radiation
I don't know what specification you're looking at but you're completely wrong.

I do understand that you have to recall that radioactive elements can emit ionising radiation, however that is not sufficient detail to explain or describe how a gamma ray is produced. That is called stating where ionising radiation comes from.

The specification for topic one is as follows in regards to ionisation:

General Understanding: ionising radiations, including that they are emitted all the time by radioactive materials and that they can transfer energy

2.8 Recall that ionising radiations are emitted all the time by radioactive sources

2.9 Describe that ionising radiation includes alpha and beta particles and gamma rays and that they transfer energy

You're required to know that GAMMA is a TYPE of IONISING radiation. You are not required to recall that it is emitted by an unstable nucleus or that mutual annihilation emits two gamma photons.

However, under the specification for P2:

Nuclear fission & fusion:

5.3 Recall that alpha and beta particles and gamma rays are ionising radiations emitted from unstable nuclei in a random process
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