Actual textbook definition is incorrect?

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Ash8991
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For OCR Chemistry Unit 2, the textbook states that the definition for Structural Isomers is: "Structural Isomers are molecules with the same molecular formula but with different structural arrangement of atoms".

Now, in F322 June 2014, the mark scheme for a question asking for that definition says: "...molecules having the same molecular formula but different structural formulae"
"..'different arrange of atoms' is not sufficient"

So, me reciting the literal textbook definition is incorrect? I can make sense of the definition within the mark scheme but it worries me how the mark scheme sort of implies that the textbook is incorrect :/
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999tigger
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(Original post by Ash8991)
For OCR Chemistry Unit 2, the textbook states that the definition for Structural Isomers is: "Structural Isomers are molecules with the same molecular formula but with different structural arrangement of atoms".

Now, in F322 June 2014, the mark scheme for a question asking for that definition says: "...molecules having the same molecular formula but different structural formulae"
"..'different arrange of atoms' is not sufficient"

So, me reciting the literal textbook definition is incorrect? I can make sense of the definition within the mark scheme but it worries me how the mark scheme sort of implies that the textbook is incorrect :/
Just use the one from the mark scheme and dont think any further. You are sitting their exam. Its not worth distracting yourself over.
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Beth_H
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Which textbook do you have? There tend to be a few for each course, and not all of them are always endorsed by the exam board.

It might also be worth having a look at some more past papers and seeing what answers the mark scheme gives for similar questions (I'd be surprised if a question like that hadn't come up a few times). I don't take chemistry, so I can't comment on which definition is better, but you could also try and phrase your answer in the exam to include both definitions, e.g. "structural isomers are molecules with the same molecular formula, but a different structural arrangement of atoms (and therefore different structural formulae)".
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