The Student Room Group

Is it harder to pass in your own car

I'm dubious.

Just failed my test, again.

Throughout my learning I have been told by my instructor that it is harder to pass in your own car and you need additional expensive insurance (that's a lie)

So as he lied about the additional insurance could he be lying about it being so much harder to pass in your own car in order to keep me on?

Currently I pay £62 for the test and then a further ****ing £70 which is outrageous for a test and 1 hour lesson before hand!!!!

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Original post by Ollie1999
I'm dubious.

Just failed my test, again.

Throughout my learning I have been told by my instructor that it is harder to pass in your own car and you need additional expensive insurance (that's a lie)

So as he lied about the additional insurance could he be lying about it being so much harder to pass in your own car in order to keep me on?

Currently I pay £62 for the test and then a further ****ing £70 which is outrageous for a test and 1 hour lesson before hand!!!!


If you've been driving in your own car and you're used to it, I don't see how it would be any harder to pass
Original post by Ollie1999
I'm dubious.

Just failed my test, again.

Throughout my learning I have been told by my instructor that it is harder to pass in your own car and you need additional expensive insurance (that's a lie)

So as he lied about the additional insurance could he be lying about it being so much harder to pass in your own car in order to keep me on?

Currently I pay £62 for the test and then a further ****ing £70 which is outrageous for a test and 1 hour lesson before hand!!!!


You may need specific additional insurance because you are not on a lesson and not a full licence holder. Although there is someone in the car they are not the same as an accompanying driver or an instructor so therefore the insurance company MAY impose a further cost on you.

As far as being harder or easier - in my opinion that's a load of rubbish. If you can drive you should be able to pass in either car.

One further observation, if you are taking your test in your instructor's car you will be using that car for probably at least 2 hours and perhaps more depending on how far from the test centre you live. Let's say 2.5 hours :wink: At £25 per hour that's £62.50, not far off what you are paying. During that time the instructor cannot use the car for anything else so it is only fair that you pay for the use of it.

For me, almost any test deprives me of 2 x 1.5 lesson slots, due to the fixed diary system that I use, at £36 per lesson i.e., £72. I don't charge that - I charge less - but it would not be unreasonable to do so, would it?
(edited 6 years ago)
Reply 3
Original post by Emma-Ashley
You may need specific additional insurance because you are not on a lesson and not a full licence holder. Although there is someone in the car they are not the same as an accompanying driver or an instructor so therefore the insurance company MAY impose a further cost on you.

As far as being harder or easier - in my opinion that's a load of rubbish. If you can drive you should be able to pass in either car.

One further observation, if you are taking your test in your instructor's car you will be using that car for probably at least 2 hours and perhaps more depending on how far from the test centre you live. Let's say 2.5 hours :wink: At £25 per hour that's £62.50, not far off what you are paying. During that time the instructor cannot use the car for anything else so it is only fair that you pay for the use of it.

For me, almost any test deprives me of 2 x 1.5 lesson slots, due to the fixed diary system that I use, at £36 per lesson i.e., £72. I don't charge that - I charge less - but it would not be unreasonable to do so, would it?


I called about the insurance it is no extra for me.

The way I see it though I have spent a good £500 already on him and I am repeatedly being charged £72 for a 3 hour slot and I don't even have 3 hours ? ?
Reply 4
Original post by Ollie1999
I called about the insurance it is no extra for me.

The way I see it though I have spent a good £500 already on him and I am repeatedly being charged £72 for a 3 hour slot and I don't even have 3 hours ? ?


You can take your practical test in any car you like as long as it doesn't break any of the rules. It could be a parent's car, the car you learned to drive in with your instructor, or the car you'll be driving once you've passed. However, you must check your insurance company covers your test.

To be safe for an examiner, your chosen car must:

have a seatbelt for the examiner
have an interior rear-view mirror for the examiner (you can get these in shops like Halfords)
have a proper passenger headrest
be a smoke-free environment - no last-minute cigarette before your test!

Shouldn't be an issue taking the test in your own car.
Reply 5
My sons took their tests in our family car. They were insured by Marmalade as learners. The test was covered, and when they passed the only insurance implication is they could no longer drive it until their proper insurance was confirmed.
Reply 6
My son took his test in his own car rather than the instructors as he felt more confident in his own car and passed first time.

The only downside to using your own car is that you may have to leave it close to the test centre as, from the moment you pass, your learner driver insurance is void and you can't drive that car again until you've taken out full insurance.
Reply 7
Original post by nutz99
My son took his test in his own car rather than the instructors as he felt more confident in his own car and passed first time.

The only downside to using your own car is that you may have to leave it close to the test centre as, from the moment you pass, your learner driver insurance is void and you can't drive that car again until you've taken out full insurance.


:five:
Reply 8
Original post by nutz99
My son took his test in his own car rather than the instructors as he felt more confident in his own car and passed first time.

The only downside to using your own car is that you may have to leave it close to the test centre as, from the moment you pass, your learner driver insurance is void and you can't drive that car again until you've taken out full insurance.


The only downside to using your own car is that you may have to leave it close to the test centre as, from the moment you pass, your learner driver insurance is void and you can't drive that car again until you've taken out full insurance.

You need someone with a full license to accompany you to the test. Most people who would like do this, would have a drive any car policy, shouldn't really need to leave it there.
Reply 9
Original post by Tubbz
The only downside to using your own car is that you may have to leave it close to the test centre as, from the moment you pass, your learner driver insurance is void and you can't drive that car again until you've taken out full insurance.

You need someone with a full license to accompany you to the test. Most people who would like do this, would have a drive any car policy, shouldn't really need to leave it there.


Or just get a parent to accompany you to the test centre, then they get a cup of coffee and wait 30 mins before driving the newly passed driver home to celebrate.


Posted from TSR Mobile
Reply 10
Original post by Doonesbury
Or just get a parent to accompany you to the test centre, then they get a cup of coffee and wait 30 mins before driving the newly passed driver home to celebrate.


Posted from TSR Mobile


That's what I was implying, whoever accompanies you should be able to bring you home.
Reply 11
Original post by Tubbz
That's what I was implying, whoever accompanies you should be able to bring you home.


Oh sorry. The bit above having a drive any car policy was throwing me.

Posted from TSR Mobile
Reply 12
Original post by Doonesbury
Oh sorry. The bit above having a drive any car policy was throwing me.

Posted from TSR Mobile


If it isn't a parent for example, generally anyone accompanying you while you travel to test will have their own insurance, so can bring the car back on your behalf.
Reply 13
Original post by Tubbz
If it isn't a parent for example, generally anyone accompanying you while you travel to test will have their own insurance, so can bring the car back on your behalf.


Well if they aren't a named or main driver for that vehicle they will only have 3rd Party Only cover.

That's sufficient to legally drive it, but not ideal.
Reply 14
Original post by Doonesbury
Well if they aren't a named or main driver for that vehicle they will only have 3rd Party Only cover.

That's sufficient to legally drive it, but not ideal.


I'm working on the basis that most first time drivers are rolling around in £200 death traps that are more to insure than the car is worth.

I'm aware this isn't the norm any more, but at least it's an option.
Original post by Ollie1999
I called about the insurance it is no extra for me.

The way I see it though I have spent a good £500 already on him and I am repeatedly being charged £72 for a 3 hour slot and I don't even have 3 hours ? ?


That's why I said 'may'. You don't so that is good. :smile:

I'm not trying to justify the £72, just pointing out the other side of the coin.
Reply 16
Original post by Tubbz
If it isn't a parent for example, generally anyone accompanying you while you travel to test will have their own insurance, so can bring the car back on your behalf.
It really depends on the insurer. I checked on this and ours don't - we would not be covered to drive any other car, even third party. In recent years I believe that is the norm rather than the exception.
Reply 17
Original post by nutz99
It really depends on the insurer. I checked on this and ours don't - we would not be covered to drive any other car, even third party. In recent years I believe that is the norm rather than the exception.


That's the norm for under 25s, but anyone over 25 usually has this included as part of their policy. Cheapo insurance providers may not be offering this, but mainstream providers do.
Original post by Tubbz
You can take your practical test in any car you like as long as it doesn't break any of the rules. It could be a parent's car, the car you learned to drive in with your instructor, or the car you'll be driving once you've passed. However, you must check your insurance company covers your test.

To be safe for an examiner, your chosen car must:

have a seatbelt for the examiner
have an interior rear-view mirror for the examiner (you can get these in shops like Halfords)
have a proper passenger headrest
be a smoke-free environment - no last-minute cigarette before your test!

Shouldn't be an issue taking the test in your own car.


I agree.
I did my test in my own car and passed fine, Went with my mum and she drove home.

As people above said, as long as its complies with all the rules on the website you should be fine. Why would you need to pay your driving instructor for lessons before hand?

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