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    Hello
    Basically I'm at a dilemma. Fine with constitution and judiciary but our teacher left on sick leave and we had a supply who was awful for Parliament. With half term coming up should I:
    Revise Parliament which will basically be self teaching myself as the teacher bareley covered anything
    Or
    Self teach PM And Cabinet


    Which one do you think is easier? And which one tends to have easier more straightforward questions for 40 markers


    Thanks
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    (Original post by bioenthusiast)
    Hello
    Basically I'm at a dilemma. Fine with constitution and judiciary but our teacher left on sick leave and we had a supply who was awful for Parliament. With half term coming up should I:
    Revise Parliament which will basically be self teaching myself as the teacher bareley covered anything
    Or
    Self teach PM And Cabinet


    Which one do you think is easier? And which one tends to have easier more straightforward questions for 40 markers


    Thanks
    I study constitution and parliament. I think that they go quite well together and it's all stuff that can be used in other topics (such as HoL reform links in nicely with the creation and separation of the SC). If you'd like, I can send you my notes on Parliament?
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    Hi,how many sides are you roughly meant to write for Unit 1 edexcel AS politics, for 10 and 25 marker.
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    (Original post by Jelly432)
    Hi,how many sides are you roughly meant to write for Unit 1 edexcel AS politics, for 10 and 25 marker.
    Depending on your writing style, about 1 to 1.5 sides of A4 for a 10 marker and maybe 3 sides for a 25? You've probably heard this a lot but it's definitely more about quality than quantity! So long as you use plenty of theory/examples and analyse your points, you'll be fine. I'd recommend 2 decent paragraphs for a 10 marker (as it usually asks for 2 points) and 3-4 for a 25 marker depending on how many arguments you've got.
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    (Original post by greghayes)
    Depending on your writing style, about 1 to 1.5 sides of A4 for a 10 marker and maybe 3 sides for a 25? You've probably heard this a lot but it's definitely more about quality than quantity! So long as you use plenty of theory/examples and analyse your points, you'll be fine. I'd recommend 2 decent paragraphs for a 10 marker (as it usually asks for 2 points) and 3-4 for a 25 marker depending on how many arguments you've got.
    Thank You,also do you think we need to use statistics such as dates and the turnouts for election and the number of seats each party gained in election,because i haven't really memorised it yet.
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    (Original post by Jelly432)
    Thank You,also do you think we need to use statistics such as dates and the turnouts for election and the number of seats each party gained in election,because i haven't really memorised it yet.
    Yes if possible as they can be used for analysis as well. For example, if you wanted to make the point that Parliament is unrepresentative, you could say that 22m votes in 2015 went to losing parties, UKIP had 12.6% of vote share but only gained one seat whereas the SNP had 1.4m votes but gained 56 seats, and that 191 MPs currently hold their seats having won less than 30% of the vote in theor constituency. It makes it look like you know your stuff, and can be used in a variety of topics (such as those examples could be used in Parliament or Electoral Systems for FPTP).
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    (Original post by greghayes)
    Yes if possible as they can be used for analysis as well. For example, if you wanted to make the point that Parliament is unrepresentative, you could say that 22m votes in 2015 went to losing parties, UKIP had 12.6% of vote share but only gained one seat whereas the SNP had 1.4m votes but gained 56 seats, and that 191 MPs currently hold their seats having won less than 30% of the vote in theor constituency. It makes it look like you know your stuff, and can be used in a variety of topics (such as those examples could be used in Parliament or Electoral Systems for FPTP).
    Yeah,thanks so much.
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    (Original post by greghayes)
    I study constitution and parliament. I think that they go quite well together and it's all stuff that can be used in other topics (such as HoL reform links in nicely with the creation and separation of the SC). If you'd like, I can send you my notes on Parliament?
    That'd be great thanks! I'd appreciate it very much
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    (Original post by bioenthusiast)
    Hello
    Basically I'm at a dilemma. Fine with constitution and judiciary but our teacher left on sick leave and we had a supply who was awful for Parliament. With half term coming up should I:
    Revise Parliament which will basically be self teaching myself as the teacher bareley covered anything
    Or
    Self teach PM And Cabinet


    Which one do you think is easier? And which one tends to have easier more straightforward questions for 40 markers




    Thanks

    I would do Parliament. it is a cornerstone of politics. If you revise and understand accurately it will supply you with the basic grounding of PM and Cabinet.

    Because the PM; First lord of treasury and His/Her cabinet uphold the Parliamentary law and code or at least they should do. If you understand the constitution and the role of Parliament you will be able to "weed" out anything parliamentarians do which trespasses what they are allowed to do. Arguing and writing about grey areas such as Brexit article 50 vote etc will show that you understand that the nature of Parliamentary principles is; evolutionary, "grey" and will often be supported by one set of politicians and detested by another.

    (A* - Politics at A level; I self taught myself -- teacher had the nerve to make out like it was all his doing! silly blowhard.)

    Hope this helps, I'm sure you'll ace it!
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    (Original post by honestly)
    I would do Parliament. it is a cornerstone of politics. If you revise and understand accurately it will supply you with the basic grounding of PM and Cabinet.

    Because the PM; First lord of treasury and His/Her cabinet uphold the Parliamentary law and code or at least they should do. If you understand the constitution and the role of Parliament you will be able to "weed" out anything parliamentarians do which trespasses what they are allowed to do. Arguing and writing about grey areas such as Brexit article 50 vote etc will show that you understand that the nature of Parliamentary principles is; evolutionary, "grey" and will often be supported by one set of politicians and detested by another.

    (A* - Politics at A level; I self taught myself -- teacher had the nerve to make out like it was all his doing! silly blowhard.)

    Hope this helps, I'm sure you'll ace it!
    How many topics did you revise for unit 1? What did you find the hardest between those topics mentioned? Any tips on general for AS?
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    (Original post by MajorFader)
    How many topics did you revise for unit 1? What did you find the hardest between those topics mentioned? Any tips on general for AS?
    When I was about 15 I was reading 1st year undergrad Politics. It's something that I've naturally been good at. I've always envied my cousins who are effortlessly good with the sciences; sadly I don't know why I'm not. So I didn't really revise, I just read the mark scheme for buzzwords but other than that I expressed my own views with reason and fact.

    Some tips;

    Keep it simple
    think about things logically
    if you don't know don't pretend
    write persuasively
    -- write like a libertarian, even though you are not, it shows you have an open mind and usually involves thinking of the "others' point of view.
    enjoy what you read recreationally.
    Read columnists such as Peter Hitchens, Melanie Phillips, Mehdi Hassan, Maajid Nawaz, they will epitomise the Left/right - liberal/ traditionalist view points then you sorta know where each argument stands.
    don't get stressed out, its politics, believe me its not as hard as Eng Lit, history Theology etc
    and PM me if I can help!



    -- what are you finding the most hardest?
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    (Original post by honestly)
    I would do Parliament. it is a cornerstone of politics. If you revise and understand accurately it will supply you with the basic grounding of PM and Cabinet.

    Because the PM; First lord of treasury and His/Her cabinet uphold the Parliamentary law and code or at least they should do. If you understand the constitution and the role of Parliament you will be able to "weed" out anything parliamentarians do which trespasses what they are allowed to do. Arguing and writing about grey areas such as Brexit article 50 vote etc will show that you understand that the nature of Parliamentary principles is; evolutionary, "grey" and will often be supported by one set of politicians and detested by another.

    (A* - Politics at A level; I self taught myself -- teacher had the nerve to make out like it was all his doing! silly blowhard.)

    Hope this helps, I'm sure you'll ace it!
    Thank you so much!!
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    Hey i was wondering if any of you guys has any notes on the erosion of Parliamentary sovereignty
 
 
 

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