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    (Original post by Dr. Blazed)
    Why the hell not ?

    I took the infamous 15% GCSE paper last year, and the only reason the marks were so low is that the crazy examiners had decided to put a bunch of questions from the additional maths (i.e. AS standard) syllabus in. It's not like they lowered the pass mark so that suddenly, everyone would pass.
    Was this on Edexcel? If not, which board? *Reminisces about how he was absolutely stumped in the non-calc - and left a good deal of the paper blank*
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    If this was implemented you would then get people saying "I want a grade for getting 100%" and things like that. The system is fine as it is.
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    (Original post by Jools)
    You seem to imply that the student who gets A*s works harder than they need to and are likely not to have a life outside school. You'd be surprised. Whenever you see the 'success stories' in the papers, whether for GCSE, AS or A-Level, most seem to be very rounded individuals. They have ambition and drive which they don't just apply to their studies.

    And when you need ~55% in a higher paper for a Grade A in GCSE Maths, it's not that great an achievement.
    Success stories are indeed rare. As I expressed earlier, only a few 'lucky' admissions tutors have the problem of discriminating between A-grade candidates.

    I must say that although I aimed for straight A-grades, I knew what I needed to do in the final modules. Since Pure Mathematics was the weakest of my subjects, I focused on that subject in the later stages of Sixth Form. I had already accumulated enough UMS points in my other three A-levels and this allowed me to 'coast' in these subjects. Had the A* been in place, I would have suffered badly.
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    (Original post by Chubb)
    If this was implemented you would then get people saying "I want a grade for getting 100%" and things like that. The system is fine as it is.
    Now that's just preposterous.

    There will never be a grade beyond A* at GCSE, why shouldn't it be any different for A-levels (which actually demand greater differentiation, due to university admission etc)?

    I think the proposals for division of As at A-level into four grades is utter dumbassness though.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)

    I think the proposals for division of As at A-level into four grades is utter dumbassness though.
    It's unfair to do that to people, they should do it to B, C, D and E grades if they wish to do it to the A grades.
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    (Original post by happysunshine)
    It's unfair to do that to people, they should do it to B, C, D and E grades if they wish to do it to the A grades.
    True, it would totally demean every other grade if we had a scenario like this:

    A (1)
    A (2)
    A (3)
    A (4)
    B
    C
    D
    E

    (As well as looking effing ridiculous too).

    If they bother at all, then they should just create an A* grade.
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    Do away with grades altogether and just give a percentage, that's as differential as you can get and avoids the scenario above.
    but then u get a silly scenario of employers not knowing what is a "good" %age in a certain subject. In maths 70% may mean top 15% whilst in Politics 85% may mean top 15% ect.
    Atleast the grades mean u can compare subjects **reasonably** acurately.
    And it doesn't allow for some papers being harder or some boards being harder ect.
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    How about just making the exams harder so A grades get their value back.
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    (Original post by SsEe)
    How about just making the exams harder so A grades get their value back.
    This will never happen, because 50% of the cohort needs to enter HE, for some peculiar reason...
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    (Original post by Jools)
    What's to say that they didn't plagiarise it from the Internet, pay a professional service to do it for them, or get a bit of help from Daddy or their tutor?
    And who's to say coursework, rather than exams, are not where their natural talants lie?
    For me Exams illustrate one's ability to work under pressure. Coursework illustrates one's capacity for sustained hard work.

    Oh yeah, and most universities demand a piece of _coursework_ called a dissertation. Who's to say those aren't frequently plagiarised - in a so much more sophisticated way, of course.
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    Well apparently people think a B in Physics is superior to an A in Drama so the grade system is also no good for comparing between subjects; an attempt to quantify qualitative (and subjective) value
    (Snipped)
    Ok, hand the physicist a script and a stage and tell them to 'do their stuff'.
    I've heard the same about art. OhhhK, Here's a black canvas. We'll be back in three hours and we expect a fully completed masterpiece.
    :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    This will never happen, because 50% of the cohort needs to enter HE, for some peculiar reason...
    50 % of which cohort? I know, but I just want to ensure that you do.
    Personally, I believe that with the current emphasis on 'Lifelong' learning and inclusion, their aims are ageist.
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    (Original post by bratcat)
    50 % of which cohort? I know, but I just want to ensure that you do.
    Personally, I believe that with the current emphasis on 'Lifelong' learning and inclusion, their aims are ageist.
    I don't (and wouldn't pretend to) know the particulars - but isn't the Government aiming to get 50% of 18-30 y.os into HE?

    So therefore the 18-30 cohort.
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    Well exactly. http://www.uk-learning.net/showpost....0&postcount=32
    Yep. Polymaths are rare. And rest assured, I ain't one of 'em!
 
 
 
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