Computing & IT course a disappointment to anyone else wanting to pursue software dev?

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zshaw
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#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
I just finished my first year of BSc (Honours) Computing and IT and I'm honestly extremely disappointed with the course so far. I guess its my own fault for not researching enough, but I really thought the degree would at least be teaching the basics of software development...

My digital life (TU100), 60 of the credits was honestly a joke with large amounts of the course essentially boiling down to reading comprehension of tech articles and applying the extremely basic info taught in the course. "How to recognise whether a tech article is reliable" and other rubbish is taught.

The "programming" is taught using a program called sense which is literally dragging and dropping pseudo code to fix an unfinished program, which teaches you LITERALLY NOTHING about real programming at all. I came into the course with a basic knowledge of java and their attempt at teaching programming is laughably bad.

TU100 has since been replaced by TM111/112 which ACTUALLY TEACHES YOU PYTHON and software development skills. If I'd known, I would have waited a year before beginning. TU100 was a complete waste of time.

Technologies in practice (TM129) was ok. Not great. Once again opting to use a pointless type of pseudo programming where you direct a robot around. They also make you install Ubuntu on a virtual machine.

The networking section was technical and interesting though, but barely necessary to pass the course, so I only really learned much of it from my own interest, rather than it being a requirement of the course.

Essential mathematics 1 (MST124) was actually pretty great. The text book was very straight forward and the past papers are all available online. I actually wish I'd done maths and a second subject because of how well the material was laid out.

The second year looks far far more promising with the ability to choose 4 software development based fields.

However do ANY of the third year modules include any object oriented programming? Seriously does the third year contain any actual programming other than HTML?? I actually cant see any mention of it whatsoever :/.

Talking to my friends who did computing and computer science subjects their first years were focused on learning c++ or java, doing mobile or web development and completing a project by the end of the year. Mine was writing essays on why drones are considered robots and dragging pseudo code into mostly finished projects.

Does anyone know if I'd be able to transfer to a brick and mortar university for my third year or would the lack of formal programming being taught make this impossible?

TLDR: The course is probably decent if you want to go into IT or networking but my first year was a doss in terms of software development. However it looks liked they've swapped the worst part of the course, TU100
, for an actual programming based module so it might be ok now.
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zshaw
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#2
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#2
You're right, thanks, I'll work as hard as I can on my portfolio in the meantime.
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PersianCatLady
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#3
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#3
(Original post by zshaw)
I just finished my first year of BSc (Honours) Computing and IT and I'm honestly extremely disappointed with the course so far. I guess its my own fault for not researching enough, but I really thought the degree would at least be teaching the basics of software development...

My digital life (TU100), 60 of the credits was honestly a joke with large amounts of the course essentially boiling down to reading comprehension of tech articles and applying the extremely basic info taught in the course. "How to recognise whether a tech article is reliable" and other rubbish is taught.

The "programming" is taught using a program called sense which is literally dragging and dropping pseudo code to fix an unfinished program, which teaches you LITERALLY NOTHING about real programming at all. I came into the course with a basic knowledge of java and their attempt at teaching programming is laughably bad.

TU100 has since been replaced by TM111/112 which ACTUALLY TEACHES YOU PYTHON and software development skills. If I'd known, I would have waited a year before beginning. TU100 was a complete waste of time.

Technologies in practice (TM129) was ok. Not great. Once again opting to use a pointless type of pseudo programming where you direct a robot around. They also make you install Ubuntu on a virtual machine.

The networking section was technical and interesting though, but barely necessary to pass the course, so I only really learned much of it from my own interest, rather than it being a requirement of the course.

Essential mathematics 1 (MST124) was actually pretty great. The text book was very straight forward and the past papers are all available online. I actually wish I'd done maths and a second subject because of how well the material was laid out.

The second year looks far far more promising with the ability to choose 4 software development based fields.

However do ANY of the third year modules include any object oriented programming? Seriously does the third year contain any actual programming other than HTML?? I actually cant see any mention of it whatsoever :/.

Talking to my friends who did computing and computer science subjects their first years were focused on learning c++ or java, doing mobile or web development and completing a project by the end of the year. Mine was writing essays on why drones are considered robots and dragging pseudo code into mostly finished projects.

Does anyone know if I'd be able to transfer to a brick and mortar university for my third year or would the lack of formal programming being taught make this impossible?

TLDR: The course is probably decent if you want to go into IT or networking but my first year was a doss in terms of software development. However it looks liked they've swapped the worst part of the course, TU100
, for an actual programming based module so it might be ok now.
I cannot believe how much you are complaining about the OU's lack of software development modules.

Have you even read the list of level 2 modules, including M250 - OBJECT-ORIENTED JAVA PROGRAMMING??
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JollyCynic
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#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by Sarah1979)
I cannot believe how much you are complaining about the OU's lack of software development modules.

Have you even read the list of level 2 modules, including M250 - OBJECT-ORIENTED JAVA PROGRAMMING??
I agree with the OU putting most of the coding aspects of the degree in Stage 2. There's a common misconception that computer science or software engineering degrees are about coding.

Many universities use simple languages to teach core programming concepts in the first year. Other universities teach the basics of a more mature language so that they don't have to start completely over again after the first year.

The learning of a language in a university degree programme is essentially incidental as it's necessary to learn the concepts taught in a practical context. If someone's going to university to learn coding, they're really wasting a lot of time and money.

There shouldn't be any need to teach languages after the second stage/year, as by then it is assumed that all the students are competent at coding, and that they have the ability to learn new languages as necessary.

I do agree that the options are rather slim at Stage 3, however. Nonetheless, it gives opportunity to study, for example, proper design, engineering, testing, and process, and demonstrate these at a high level. (Frankly, these can also be learned for free on the Internet if you use high quality resources, but the commitment is not negligible.)
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