whoknowsreally
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Okay so I'm currently sitting my GCSE's and have chosen my a levels for when I begin college in September. I have picked english (it's a combined literature and language course), psychology, philosophy and sociology, although one of them I will sit at the end of first year as an AS level (as of yet i have not picked which one). GCSE's already have been majorly stressful and when I tell people what I have picked for A levels they always have a comment to say about how it's gonna be so much work, I'm going to regret it etc. I just wanted to see if anyone on here has any experience/advice? I largely enjoy english based subjects, am quite skilled in writing and took sociology for GCSE and averaged out at about a B so far but I have no experience with psychology or philosophy. I'm wondering if I should drop something and take either history or photography instead?
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theOrangeJuice
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I haven't taken any of those subjects but I heard there's a lot of writing

Are you planning on going to university? What do you want to study? Most people do their a levels towards uni.
If you don't plan on going to uni, what do you want to do as a job?
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bashirattt
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(Original post by whoknowsreally)
Okay so I'm currently sitting my GCSE's and have chosen my a levels for when I begin college in September. I have picked english (it's a combined literature and language course), psychology, philosophy and sociology, although one of them I will sit at the end of first year as an AS level (as of yet i have not picked which one). GCSE's already have been majorly stressful and when I tell people what I have picked for A levels they always have a comment to say about how it's gonna be so much work, I'm going to regret it etc. I just wanted to see if anyone on here has any experience/advice? I largely enjoy english based subjects, am quite skilled in writing and took sociology for GCSE and averaged out at about a B so far but I have no experience with psychology or philosophy. I'm wondering if I should drop something and take either history or photography instead?
same boat as you but i thought we only choose 3 a levels as they're becoming linear so we sit at the end of year 13?? but my 3 are philosophy, sociology and history. but if it has to be 4 a levels, my 4th would be government & politics or english literature
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Beccajane2
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No not too much if you work hard. I do Englit, psychology, philosophy (ethics and religion) and maths. And it's fine. It's stressful but then all alevels are. They are no more stressful than my friends doing sciences or languages or history 🙂🙂


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bashirattt
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(Original post by whoknowsreally)
Okay so I'm currently sitting my GCSE's and have chosen my a levels for when I begin college in September. I have picked english (it's a combined literature and language course), psychology, philosophy and sociology, although one of them I will sit at the end of first year as an AS level (as of yet i have not picked which one). GCSE's already have been majorly stressful and when I tell people what I have picked for A levels they always have a comment to say about how it's gonna be so much work, I'm going to regret it etc. I just wanted to see if anyone on here has any experience/advice? I largely enjoy english based subjects, am quite skilled in writing and took sociology for GCSE and averaged out at about a B so far but I have no experience with psychology or philosophy. I'm wondering if I should drop something and take either history or photography instead?
do gcse sociology too!! what was your exam board, mine was ocr.
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whoknowsreally
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(Original post by theOrangeJuice)
I haven't taken any of those subjects but I heard there's a lot of writing

Are you planning on going to university? What do you want to study? Most people do their a levels towards uni.
If you don't plan on going to uni, what do you want to do as a job?
wow intense questioning haha, makes me feel slightly existential. at this point in time i do foresee university playing a part in my future but i feel like i've never truly considered a future that doesn't involve university, and it's not something i want to do but instead something i feel i have to. in terms of a career i've always seen myself edging towards the psychologist route - specifically psychoanalytic - but as of late i've been thinking more towards something english based as i enjoy it so highly.
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whoknowsreally
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(Original post by bashirattt)
do gcse sociology too!! what was your exam board, mine was ocr.
yeah mine is OCR. sat the actual exams last week or so.
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whoknowsreally
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(Original post by bashirattt)
same boat as you but i thought we only choose 3 a levels as they're becoming linear so we sit at the end of year 13?? but my 3 are philosophy, sociology and history. but if it has to be 4 a levels, my 4th would be government & politics or english literature
oh, really? i have no idea. when i went for my interview at the college she asked what i wanted to choose, i said philosophy, english and psychology and she insisted i had to take four due to my GCSE target grades or something, as a couple of my friends with lower target grades/SAT results etc were told to only pick three. however as i said, one of mine will be AS so i'm not sure.
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whoknowsreally
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(Original post by Beccajane2)
No not too much if you work hard. I do Englit, psychology, philosophy (ethics and religion) and maths. And it's fine. It's stressful but then all alevels are. They are no more stressful than my friends doing sciences or languages or history 🙂🙂


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really? how stressful are we talking in comparison to GCSE? I've heard that psychology is just a lot of research methods and is somewhat boring?
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theOrangeJuice
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(Original post by whoknowsreally)
wow intense questioning haha, makes me feel slightly existential. at this point in time i do foresee university playing a part in my future but i feel like i've never truly considered a future that doesn't involve university, and it's not something i want to do but instead something i feel i have to. in terms of a career i've always seen myself edging towards the psychologist route - specifically psychoanalytic - but as of late i've been thinking more towards something english based as i enjoy it so highly.
You'll be asked those questions lots of times as you get closer to uni
Sounds good, those subjects seem to match. Remember, at A level you have "free time" which you can utilise to get work done. But this time is usually used to go to the shops
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whoknowsreally
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(Original post by theOrangeJuice)
You'll be asked those questions lots of times as you get closer to uni
Sounds good, those subjects seem to match. Remember, at A level you have "free time" which you can utilise to get work done. But this time is usually used to go to the shops
oh gosh i'm not ready haha. yeah that's a fair point; however i'm not great at focusing, but i guess now is as good a time as any to change that.
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bashirattt
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(Original post by whoknowsreally)
yeah mine is OCR. sat the actual exams last week or so.
how did you find it? the pre release was sooo good! for b672, i do family, youth & crime. the crime 24m kind of threw me off and b671 when it was discussing religion and gender identities
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whoknowsreally
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(Original post by bashirattt)
how did you find it? the pre release was sooo good! for b672, i do family, youth & crime. the crime 24m kind of threw me off and b671 when it was discussing religion and gender identities
pm me and we can discuss it?
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theOrangeJuice
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(Original post by whoknowsreally)
oh gosh i'm not ready haha. yeah that's a fair point; however i'm not great at focusing, but i guess now is as good a time as any to change that.
If you're not good at focusing it's important to get some good notes down. I'm awful at focusing and usually forget everything i've been told in lesson, so every few months I write a big book of everything i'm meant to know and spend an hour or two using it with some questions to ensure it's stuck in my mind

You'll find your own revision technique, so don't worry about that. You'll do fine! I picked my subjects by looking at the timetable and dropped the subject that had a lesson before lunch so I could just go home
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Pink fizz
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(Original post by whoknowsreally)
really? how stressful are we talking in comparison to GCSE? I've heard that psychology is just a lot of research methods and is somewhat boring?
Psychology isn't a lot of research methods but it does play apart. I don't really find it boring but it depends on you really
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whoknowsreally
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(Original post by theOrangeJuice)
If you're not good at focusing it's important to get some good notes down. I'm awful at focusing and usually forget everything i've been told in lesson, so every few months I write a big book of everything i'm meant to know and spend an hour or two using it with some questions to ensure it's stuck in my mind

You'll find your own revision technique, so don't worry about that. You'll do fine! I picked my subjects by looking at the timetable and dropped the subject that had a lesson before lunch so I could just go home
haha i like that thinking! yeah, hopefully i'll be fine. thank you for the help
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Beccajane2
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(Original post by whoknowsreally)
really? how stressful are we talking in comparison to GCSE? I've heard that psychology is just a lot of research methods and is somewhat boring?
Stressful but I've managed to survive AS. Nearly taken all my AS exams now. More stressful than GCSE as it's all harder but it's very different to GCSE'S and you manage work and revision differently. All my friends do 4 subjects (including one AS) and ALevels seem to be stressful in general whatever you do. Yeah research methods is really boring and I'm not a fan of psychology but some people really like it. But it's my best subjects grades wise so I'll probably stick with it 🙂


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Pedrex
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I did English literature for AS level but not combined lit and lang like you going to do. They seem to be quite challenging and will have alot of writing haha

If you think you can cope then go for it, especially if you like writing! If you think it'll be too much then drop one and go for one which doesn't involve much writing, like Product Design or Photography? Completely up to you though
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artful_lounger
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It will be slightly less work than you expect as psychology/sociology and english lit/language/philosophy have some degree of similarity/conceptual crossover (at the least of terminology and writing/answering styles in some of the cases).

The main thing is you will be doing a huge amount of writing, and a fair bit of reading. Since based on your subject choice, it's likely you enjoy this, you should be ok. However, if you don't already you should type all your essays else you get hand cramps or repetitive strain injury

Also not to put a damper on things but psychoanalysis isn't really seen as much more than a historical period of thought and/or novelty. The practise of psychoanalysis isn't common and typically viewed as "hack psychology", not the least because the entire field was based on Freud's own misogyny and failed relationships (platonic, familial and romantic) with women. So...yea. Jungian stuff tends to hold a little more water but compared to cognitive neuroscience (e.g. cognitive behavioural therapy) and various wellbeing focused counseling, as well as neuropharmacological interventions (typically by a GP), from a clinical point of view it is a bit outdated. From an academic point of view, cognitive neuroscience and neurobiological approaches tend to dominate with various emphases (e.g. social, behavioural/developmental, medical neuroscience)

I am not a psychologist though, academic or otherwise, so these are purely an outsiders perspective of the field. However, on this basis unless you're looking at slightly more philosophical courses, such as Mental Philosophy (the former name of broadly the field of psychology/sociology, back before it existed as an individual entity in early modern times) at Aberdeen, or PPL (Philosophy, Psychology, and Linguistics) at Oxford, you may want to consider swapping one (or two, even) for A-level Biology in view of the increasingly neurobiological angle of the field (even the cognitive neuroscience stuff often considers neurobiological processes in it's analysis).
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Katiee01
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(Original post by whoknowsreally)
wow intense questioning haha, makes me feel slightly existential. at this point in time i do foresee university playing a part in my future but i feel like i've never truly considered a future that doesn't involve university, and it's not something i want to do but instead something i feel i have to. in terms of a career i've always seen myself edging towards the psychologist route - specifically psychoanalytic - but as of late i've been thinking more towards something english based as i enjoy it so highly.
My mum founded & directs a large educational psychology practice in London & lectures at UCL; a bit different to the route you want to go down!
She's often asked by prospective psychology students what subjects they should study to get onto a good course.
Of course everything is circumstantial, but generally she says it's much better to do facilitating subjects than to do A levels like psychology.
I think she did Geography, Biology, Chemistry & English, then did Bio-Chemistry at Uni to then qualify in Psychology at the Tavistock & do a doctorate.
So you could definitely get onto a Psychology course (if you go down that route) with unrelated A Levels, so long as they are good grades.
That way maybe you could balance out your choices with a less heavy writing subject if you felt these 4 would be too much
Good luck!
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