Dishonest Jeremy Corbyn avoids the questions again

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AlexanderHam
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Corbyn went into the Mumsnet chat with a seeming determination to continue his recent conversion to politicians' tactics of spin and PR by never actually answering the question you've been asked.

Instead of giving a straightforward answer to difficult questions asked, he simply ignores it and instead offers some inane platitude. Note his answers to Andrew Neil's questions about Corbyn having called NATO a 'Frankenstein' and "a danger to world peace" back in 2014.

AN: Let me turn to NATO. It was created by a Labour government. But you’ve called NATO ‘a very dangerous Frankenstein of an organisation’, ‘a danger to world peace’. Two years ago you said it should be ‘wound up’. Do you still believe that?

JC: What I’ve always believed is that NATO was a product in 1948 of the awful trajectory of the Cold War. We had the Warsaw Pact which was formed a little bit later on one side, NATO on the other. 1990, Berlin Wall came down – end of –

AN: Should it be wound up?

JC: – . I think the role of NATO now had to be to build good relations with the neighbours and insist on democracy and human rights being part of that agenda of good relations.

AN: But it was only three years ago you called it ‘a very dangerous Frankenstein’ and ‘a danger to world peace’. Do you still believe that, or not?

JC: I want to work within NATO to achieve stability. I want to work within NATO to promote a human rights democracy and under a Labour government that’s exactly what we’d be doing.

AN: But do you think it’s a ‘Frankenstein’?

JC: I think all organisations need to be accountable.

AN: So have you changed your views on NATO?

JC: No. What I’ve done – no, no.

AN: So you still think it’s a danger to world peace?

JC: Can I finish my sentence, please? Thank you.

AN: You could if you could answer my question.

JC: Andrew, NATO exists. It was a product initially of the Atlantic Charter in 1942, it then became –

AN: We know the history, Mr Corbyn. I’m trying to work out if you would be a committed supporter of NATO as every previous Prime Minister of this country has been?

JC: I will be a committed member of that alliance in order to promote peace, justice, human rights and democracy. And I believe that we can make a positive contribution on that.
When asked on the Mumsnet chat about whether he would resign if he lost the election, he answered "Proud to lead the party". What does that even mean? He would get far more respect if he could just say, "I honestly can't answer that now because I don't know".

Instead, Corbyn has the worst of all possible words; he's an extremist hard-leftist but doesn't even have the virtue of being straight-talking and being able to admit what he is. He'll say anything to get elected.

It's because of Corbyn that I, a Labour party member, a former trade union officer, will be abstaining in this election. For all the hysterical shrieking by his most fanatical supporters about how they've "closed the polling gap", the reality is that May is going to comfortably win this election. If Corbyn manages a Miliband-level performance, his supporters will cry that this is a great victory and vindication. That's right, they will claim that the party not collapsing means that Corbyn is justified to remain leader.

But if Corbyn couldn't even win over someone like me, it shows why Labour is incapable of ever winning an election under him
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the bear
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let's face it; our country no longer has a proletariat... the mines and cotton mills and whatnot all closed down ages ago. thus there are no downtrodden workers whose shackles need to be prized off. the labour party is no longer needed, especially in the crypto-communist iteration planned by Mr Corbyn and his apparatchiks.
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EternalLight
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Isn't this what all politicians do? Avoid giving straight forward answers?
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Underscore__
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(Original post by AlexanderHam)
Corbyn went into the Mumsnet chat with a seeming determination to continue his recent conversion to politicians' tactics of spin and PR by never actually answering the question you've been asked.

Instead of giving a straightforward answer to difficult questions asked, he simply ignores it and instead offers some inane platitude. Note his answers to Andrew Neil's questions about Corbyn having called NATO a 'Frankenstein' and "a danger to world peace" back in 2014.



When asked on the Mumsnet chat about whether he would resign if he lost the election, he answered "Proud to lead the party". What does that even mean? He would get far more respect if he could just say, "I honestly can't answer that now because I don't know".

Instead, Corbyn has the worst of all possible words; he's an extremist hard-leftist but doesn't even have the virtue of being straight-talking and being able to admit what he is. He'll say anything to get elected.

It's because of Corbyn that I, a Labour party member, a former trade union officer, will be abstaining in this election. For all the hysterical shrieking by his most fanatical supporters about how they've "closed the polling gap", the reality is that May is going to comfortably win this election. If Corbyn manages a Miliband-level performance, his supporters will cry that this is a great victory and vindication. That's right, they will claim that the party not collapsing means that Corbyn is justified to remain leader.

But if Corbyn couldn't even win over someone like me, it shows why Labour is incapable of ever winning an election under him
Next time I have to answer a difficult question I might try just giving an unwanted history lesson


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JMR2020.
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Hmmm.....
Jeremy Corbyn much more sincere, straightforward and trustworthy as opposed to Theresa May IMHO...
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username1738683
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(Original post by AlexanderHam)
When asked on the Mumsnet chat about whether he would resign if he lost the election, he answered "Proud to lead the party". What does that even mean? He would get far more respect if he could just say, "I honestly can't answer that now because I don't know".
You know he won't resign unless the result is truly catastrophic, don't you? Him and his faction within the party will have to be dragged away kicking and screaming, even a disaster on the 8th may not be enough to dislodge them.
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username1738683
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(Original post by JMR2017)
Hmmm.....
Jeremy Corbyn much more sincere, straightforward and trustworthy as opposed to Theresa May IMHO...
Platitude alert! Randomly selected, nothing personal.
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AlexanderHam
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(Original post by zhog)
You know he won't resign unless the result is truly catastrophic, don't you?
He probably won't resign even if the result is catastrophic unless he can ensure he installs a hard-left successor.

But in terms of objective justifiability, he claimed that his political formula would result in droves of people coming to support Labour, that he would avoid the failures and compromises of the previous Labour leaders. If he only does as well as Miliband (even if he does better), it shows that his political formula doesn't work.

The people have taken a look at what Corbyn has to offer, and found it wanting. The honourable thing to do at that point would be to resign and let the parliamentary party nominate new candidates (of course he will avoid doing this if there's a chance of getting his rule change through the national conference to lower the nomination threshold to 5%)
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AlexanderHam
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(Original post by JMR2017)
Hmmm.....
Jeremy Corbyn much more sincere, straightforward and trustworthy as opposed to Theresa May IMHO...
Ohh, I thought you were being ironic. I thought you were drawing attention to the fact it's claimed he's sincere and straightforward, but this OP clearly shows he's not.

I gemmed you by accident, then. I didn't think you could possibly have been serious
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Gerry-Atricks
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AlexanderHam why do you make the effort to make these posts?
Do you honestly think you`ll change anyone`s mind or vote, most people have decided on their vote by now.
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queen-bee
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(Original post by the bear)
let's face it; our country no longer has a proletariat... the mines and cotton mills and whatnot all closed down ages ago. thus there are no downtrodden workers whose shackles need to be prized off. the labour party is no longer needed, especially in the crypto-communist iteration planned by Mr Corbyn and his apparatchiks.
I :heart: JC
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JMR2020.
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(Original post by AlexanderHam)
Ohh, I thought you were being ironic. I thought you were drawing attention to the fact it's claimed he's sincere and straightforward, but this OP clearly shows he's not.

I gemmed you by accident, then. I didn't think you could possibly have been serious
Why would it be ironic. Jeremy Corbyn actually holds the same views he did 30 years ago, whereas Theresa May just seems to be opportunistic and makes a U-turn every time she feels her views could be controversial or not be beneficial. Not to mention her repeated meaningless soundbites, e.g 'strong and stable leadership' and 'no deal is better than a bad deal'. Don't get me wrong, I did support Brexit, but as Jeremy Paxman said yesterday, how can we expect Theresa May to be a strong negotiator of Brexit if she makes U-turns every 10 seconds. Surely that will be seen as a sign of weakness by the EU...
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username1738683
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(Original post by AlexanderHam)
He probably won't resign even if the result is catastrophic unless he can ensure he installs a hard-left successor.
Indeed.

But in terms of objective justifiability, he claimed that his political formula would result in droves of people coming to support Labour, that he would avoid the failures and compromises of the previous Labour leaders. If he only does as well as Miliband (even if he does better), it shows that his political formula doesn't work.
Well, i'd say he'd be doing very well by matching Ed's score. That would consolidate his position, not enough potential for a rebellion.

The people have taken a look at what Corbyn has to offer, and found it wanting. The honourable thing to do at that point would be to resign and let the parliamentary party nominate new candidates (of course he will avoid doing this if there's a chance of getting his rule change through the national conference to lower the nomination threshold to 5%)
That would be akin to capitulation to the 'Blairites' and MPs, Corbyn is the figure head for the Unions and Momentum and they will lock him up in his office if he thinks of going anywhere. Unless, as you say, they replace him with one of their own but they wouldn't like to risk a leadership contest (Watson, Benn, Cooper...) that could see them sidelined for a long while. You know how militant they are, they would probably try to push his replacement in without a ballot.
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AlexanderHam
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(Original post by glad-he-ate-her)
AlexanderHam why do you make the effort to make these posts?
Do you honestly think you`ll change anyone`s mind or vote, most people have decided on their vote by now.
I'm expressing an opinion. That's what this website is supposed to be about.
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stoyfan
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Either way, if someone wants to see the actual convo, then it is here:
https://www.mumsnet.com/Talk/mumsnet...Sept-2pm?pg=21

Bearing in mind, this occured almost eight months ago as part of the labour leadership race.
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AlexanderHam
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(Original post by JMR2017)
Why would it be ironic. Jeremy Corbyn actually holds the same views he did 30 years ago
So he still thinks the IRA armed struggle was justified?

Corbyn can't even tell us if he still believes what he said three years ago (that NATO was a Frankenstein and a danger to world peace). Why don't you answer that, if his views are clear like you say?

Does Corbyn still think Hamas and Hezbollah are "dedicated to peace and social justice"?
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AlexanderHam
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(Original post by stoyfan)
Bearing in mind, this occured almost eight months ago as part of the labour leadership race.
No, it happened today

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017...orbyn-leaving/
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Gerry-Atricks
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(Original post by AlexanderHam)
I'm expressing an opinion. That's what this website is supposed to be about.
Yes and i wasnt trying to say you shouldn`t, but it just seems a big effort on your behalf for little yield
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username47781
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I certainly don't trust him, shudder to think what will happen to this country if he does get in.
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JMR2020.
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(Original post by AlexanderHam)
So he still thinks the IRA armed struggle was justified?

Corbyn can't even tell us if he still believes what he said three years ago (that NATO was a Frankenstein and a danger to world peace). Why don't you answer that, if his views are clear like you say?

Does Corbyn still think Hamas and Hezbollah are "dedicated to peace and social justice"?
No he never believed those things, you have just cherry picked quotes out of context like some of the media do too. He does believe that we should negotiate and try and work with people before immediately taking an aggressive stance against them.
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