purplecat14
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Hi,
I am getting really interested in the work of nurses and am really leaning towards a career in that field.
I am finding it kind of hard to find out exactly what the duties of a children's nurse are and also if I would suit the role. I am a very sensitive and emotional person.
Wondering if there are any student child nurses who could tell me about their course and what it's like, or if there are any child nurses who would be able to tell me about the job and if it gets easier to manage your emotions with experience? Basically any information about the field would be appreciated
Thanks
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bethanyhelina
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(Original post by purplecat14)
Hi,
I am getting really interested in the work of nurses and am really leaning towards a career in that field.
I am finding it kind of hard to find out exactly what the duties of a children's nurse are and also if I would suit the role. I am a very sensitive and emotional person.
Wondering if there are any student child nurses who could tell me about their course and what it's like, or if there are any child nurses who would be able to tell me about the job and if it gets easier to manage your emotions with experience? Basically any information about the field would be appreciated
Thanks
Hi! I'm Beth, a second year student nurse. The role of a children's nurse is to care for poorly children and their families, making family centred care a central aspect to children's nursing. You do this alongside a variety of other professionals (doctors, physiotherapists, midwives, occupational therapists, social workers, health visitors and lots more). As a children's nurse you're central to the child and family whilst they're receiving treatment or care whilst they need it. In doing this, you may provide personal care which involves meeting nutritional and elimination needs as well as providing prescribed drugs and carrying out routine procedure e.g inserting NG tubes or when qualified, inserting cannulas. In addition, you can teach families and children how to take care of their health and provide health advice, for example, teaching a family how to NG feed or teaching a teenager how to use their insulin pen. You will liase with other members of the team and advocate for families and children and always act in their best interest, this may involve being part of multidisciplinary team meetings. Children's nurses can work in a variety of settings including specialist children's and surgical wards, in a&e, on neonatal wards and in the community, you can also go onto being a specialist nurse e.g diabetes children's nurse or go onto become an advance practitioner in a specific area, for example, intensive care. They can also train to be health visitors or school nurses. Coming to the end of my second year I have found the course both challenging and rewarding and I have found that by being naturally empathetic and saying "if that was me or if that was my child... I would feel..." I have been able to identify and easily build relationships with families and children. Children's nursing can be emotionally challenging, but by become a children's nurse you learn to develop your emotional maturity in order to adapt to your own and the service users needs. As a person, I have become more confident with myself and better with other people. The course itself is interesting but can be demanding. You learn about physiology, common childhood conditions and illnesses such, communication, ethics, psychology, sociology, public health, medicines, communication, collaborative working and clinical skills. These are assessed through assignments, exams and practicals at my university. You also spend 50% of your time in clinical practice where you are taught and assessed by a qualified nurse who is your mentor.
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purplecat14
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(Original post by bethanyhelina)
Hi! I'm Beth, a second year student nurse. The role of a children's nurse is to care for poorly children and their families, making family centred care a central aspect to children's nursing. You do this alongside a variety of other professionals (doctors, physiotherapists, midwives, occupational therapists, social workers, health visitors and lots more). As a children's nurse you're central to the child and family whilst they're receiving treatment or care whilst they need it. In doing this, you may provide personal care which involves meeting nutritional and elimination needs as well as providing prescribed drugs and carrying out routine procedure e.g inserting NG tubes or when qualified, inserting cannulas. In addition, you can teach families and children how to take care of their health and provide health advice, for example, teaching a family how to NG feed or teaching a teenager how to use their insulin pen. You will liase with other members of the team and advocate for families and children and always act in their best interest, this may involve being part of multidisciplinary team meetings. Children's nurses can work in a variety of settings including specialist children's and surgical wards, in a&e, on neonatal wards and in the community, you can also go onto being a specialist nurse e.g diabetes children's nurse or go onto become an advance practitioner in a specific area, for example, intensive care. They can also train to be health visitors or school nurses. Coming to the end of my second year I have found the course both challenging and rewarding and I have found that by being naturally empathetic and saying "if that was me or if that was my child... I would feel..." I have been able to identify and easily build relationships with families and children. Children's nursing can be emotionally challenging, but by become a children's nurse you learn to develop your emotional maturity in order to adapt to your own and the service users needs. As a person, I have become more confident with myself and better with other people. The course itself is interesting but can be demanding. You learn about physiology, common childhood conditions and illnesses such, communication, ethics, psychology, sociology, public health, medicines, communication, collaborative working and clinical skills. These are assessed through assignments, exams and practicals at my university. You also spend 50% of your time in clinical practice where you are taught and assessed by a qualified nurse who is your mentor.


Hi Beth,
Can't thank you enough for your amazing reply, and your comments on how you are finding the course. It's really helpful to now have an actual 'job description'. I'm hoping that if I do chose to study nursing I'll be able to build confidence with people too.
Thanks again
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