Fully-Funded PhD Positions (Electronics)

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akasyyabih
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Hello everyone,

I'm planning to do my MSc this September in the University of Edinburgh (already accepted the offer; I do have offers for similar programs in the University of Bristol and the University of Manchester; I have also been sadly rejected by the University of Cambridge for an MPhil in Micro and Nanotechnology Enterprise).

I will be financing my studies through personal savings (all the money I have in my bank account, basically; international/overseas fee status ). I'm very enthusiastic about electronics design and this is the only chance I have gotten to pursue my academic interests after four years working for several multinational conglomerates in various commercial functions (this step I'm about to take completely goes against my CV, but it's only four years, right?). If I'm successful, I will try to do my PhD right after.

Now that you know a little about me, I have the following questions:

* Did I make the right choice by going with Edinburgh? (my decision was based on the courses offered, research being done at the university, and the teaching staff; I can always withdraw and go for Bristol or Manchester if there is a compelling argument)

* Will doing well at Edinburgh improve my chances of getting admitted for a PhD in say the Oxbridge or Imperial? Or is my disparate career record going to haunt me forever?

* What are my chances of getting a fully-funded PhD position in the U.K. if I do really well? (fully-funded for me = full overseas/international fees for three years + monthly stipend) How about in the U.S.?

* When should I start applying for funding? Right at the beginning of my course I assume to start directly after graduation? (although that doesn't make sense to me).


Please help guys, I don't want to be homeless after graduation (or worse, living with my parents!)
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aware1
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Slim chance for fully funded in the UK if you are not a UK/EU Resident. Everyone I know who has a funded PhD was because they paid for it or had their government back home pay. Funding is usually only given to UK/EU because it is cheaper
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akasyyabih
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(Original post by aware1)
Slim chance for fully funded in the UK if you are not a UK/EU Resident. Everyone I know who has a funded PhD was because they paid for it or had their government back home pay. Funding is usually only given to UK/EU because it is cheaper
Thank you for your feedback. Yes, sadly, researching different unis I have found that to be the case, mostly, with very few exceptions.

Isn't there a way of funding a PhD by working within the university as a TA (helping professors grade, conduct labs, and even teach introductory courses) alongside it? I guess that would make it a part-time PhD and a part-time job; is it possible? I have seen people in the U.S. do it, not sure about the U.K.

Many PhD positions do offer to pay the difference between overseas tuition and UK/EU tuition along with a stipend, so I'm mainly looking for ways to pay the remainder.

My government is becoming stringent when it comes to scholarships lately. So, unless I inherit like a 100,000 pounds from a distant uncle I didn't know about, I will have to let this go.
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