Midwifery without going to University Watch

Naeema93
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I am an graduate in the finance field with a graduate job in this position however, I have had a keen interest midwifery from a young age. I did not receive the grades required to get into Midwifery therefore was left heartbroken to say the least!I was just going to ask whether anyone knows of a Midwifery course to get into the field without attending university? Ive done a bit of research myself however, I have not been able to find any form of course which leads you straight into midwifery without a Bachelors. The reason behind this is I believe it is very unfair for disadvantaged students who have always dreamt of being a midwife but have been unable to gain the grades required to get accepted. I would like to create my own syllabus as an idea (which may possibly take years) but hopefully allow students to have a
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999tigger
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1. why didnt you just resit if you were that keen?
2.I believe its degree only, but the grade requirements arent especially high.
3. i dont think your argument makes sense about being unfair on people who cant make the grade.
4. Mystified about your idea.
5. Its still not too late to resit and go back.
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wbnurse
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I left school with absolutely nothing. Zero. I also had 2 children very young. Nothing was going to stop me being a nurse. Had to re sit my maths and english gcses again, do my a levels whilst I had small babies. 3 times I applied 3 times I was rejected. I'm now a 2nd year adult nurse student. My point is you just have to do what you have to do! I don't think it's unfair that you have to start from scratch, because that's the requirements. If it's your dream just do it. Take one step at a time not scare yourself with a massive picture of how long it will take
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lilibet01
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Hardly disadvantaged. It's a competitive course. Take an Access course and try again.
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Cece16
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(Original post by Naeema93)
I am an graduate in the finance field with a graduate job in this position however, I have had a keen interest midwifery from a young age. I did not receive the grades required to get into Midwifery therefore was left heartbroken to say the least!I was just going to ask whether anyone knows of a Midwifery course to get into the field without attending university? Ive done a bit of research myself however, I have not been able to find any form of course which leads you straight into midwifery without a Bachelors. The reason behind this is I believe it is very unfair for disadvantaged students who have always dreamt of being a midwife but have been unable to gain the grades required to get accepted. I would like to create my own syllabus as an idea (which may possibly take years) but hopefully allow students to have a
This may be the most bonkers thing I have ever read! Have you any idea the responsibility a midwife has??
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mel_l218
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(Original post by Naeema93)
I am an graduate in the finance field with a graduate job in this position however, I have had a keen interest midwifery from a young age. I did not receive the grades required to get into Midwifery therefore was left heartbroken to say the least!I was just going to ask whether anyone knows of a Midwifery course to get into the field without attending university? Ive done a bit of research myself however, I have not been able to find any form of course which leads you straight into midwifery without a Bachelors. The reason behind this is I believe it is very unfair for disadvantaged students who have always dreamt of being a midwife but have been unable to gain the grades required to get accepted. I would like to create my own syllabus as an idea (which may possibly take years) but hopefully allow students to have a
Hi Naeema, to become a midwife in the UK this requires a degree and registration with the NMC (nursing and midwifery council). Places on midwifery degrees are competitive and work experience before applying is recommended.
I am coming to the end of my access course (the equivalent of a-levels) and have a place to study adult nursing this September at my first choice university, I never thought I was very academic but I have got on well on my access course and I am on track to achieve the grades I need for my university place. So an access course is worth considering if you are really serious and want to become a midwife.
If you want to work in healthcare or maternity care and don't want to go to university, to work as a maternity support worker/maternity care assistant or a healthcare assistant in a hospital or care home you don't need a degree just a decent standard of education. This would also be a good option to gain experience in healthcare before applying to university if you choose to do so.
You can find out more information on the NHS health careers website, the NMC website and the RCM (Royal college of midwifery) website. Studentmidwife.net may also help you.
Sorry for the waffle, I hope this helps.
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comebackseason
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Midwifery is a very competitive program to get into because there are so few courses out there. Just try again many people apply multiple times before they get in
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annroseb
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Hi! I am a current third year student midwife. You have to complete a Bachelor's Degree in Midwifery to become a registered midwife. Many universities have different entry requirements, from A-levels to Access Courses. I would recommend looking at local universities and looking at their entry requirements. You can then e-mail them letting them know your qualifications and then can advise you on how to get on the course. Most people complete an Access course, where distinctions and merits are usually required. In addition to this, you should also try to get some experience in the healthcare field, or any job where you can link the skills to midwifery.

Although I understand the disadvantages of midwifery being a degree, it is also a huge privilege and pretty special thing. At the end of the three years, not only do you hold a degree, but you also are enrolled into a professional register. Not many university students get this at the end of three years, so I don't necessarily see it as a bad thing.
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lavender_rose
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(Original post by Naeema93)
I am an graduate in the finance field with a graduate job in this position however, I have had a keen interest midwifery from a young age. I did not receive the grades required to get into Midwifery therefore was left heartbroken to say the least!I was just going to ask whether anyone knows of a Midwifery course to get into the field without attending university? Ive done a bit of research myself however, I have not been able to find any form of course which leads you straight into midwifery without a Bachelors. The reason behind this is I believe it is very unfair for disadvantaged students who have always dreamt of being a midwife but have been unable to gain the grades required to get accepted. I would like to create my own syllabus as an idea (which may possibly take years) but hopefully allow students to have a
Hiya Naeema, I am currently a student midwife. There is a new midwifery apprenticeship that is due to start in 2019 https://www.rcm.org.uk/news-views-an...ips-take-shape. But, i'm not entierly clear on what the qualification on completion of the course will actually be but it seems as though it could be a bridge to get you the qualifications you need to get onto the midwifery course. Some of the ladies on the course started as Maternity support workers and were seconded by their hospitals after completing the access course. Speaking of which I would reccommend looking into the access course which is the alternative to A levels to meet the entry requirements (if you didn't know that already).
But unfortunately there are no "short cuts", to qualify as a midwife you need to hold a degree in midwifery, no getting around that I'm afraid. Also creating your own syllabus would not wash with the Nursing & Midwifery council (the governing body for nurses and midwives in the UK) otherwise I am sure that would have been done already. On a serious note, midwifery is ultimately about safeguarding the lives and wellbeing of women and their babies, so you need to know the biology behind what you are doing and the signs of symptoms of developing problems, you need the maths so that you know how to give drugs without overdosing the woman. So, the entry requirements that are put in place by universities are there for good reason. Good luck!
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Bertiekl77
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(Original post by lavender_rose)
Hiya Naeema, I am currently a student midwife. There is a new midwifery apprenticeship that is due to start in 2019 https://www.rcm.org.uk/news-views-an...ips-take-shape. But, i'm not entierly clear on what the qualification on completion of the course will actually be but it seems as though it could be a bridge to get you the qualifications you need to get onto the midwifery course. Some of the ladies on the course started as Maternity support workers and were seconded by their hospitals after completing the access course. Speaking of which I would reccommend looking into the access course which is the alternative to A levels to meet the entry requirements (if you didn't know that already).
But unfortunately there are no "short cuts", to qualify as a midwife you need to hold a degree in midwifery, no getting around that I'm afraid. Also creating your own syllabus would not wash with the Nursing & Midwifery council (the governing body for nurses and midwives in the UK) otherwise I am sure that would have been done already. On a serious note, midwifery is ultimately about safeguarding the lives and wellbeing of women and their babies, so you need to know the biology behind what you are doing and the signs of symptoms of developing problems, you need the maths so that you know how to give drugs without overdosing the woman. So, the entry requirements that are put in place by universities are there for good reason. Good luck!
I’ve seen this regarding the apprentiships but can’t find any info anywhere else?
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lavender_rose
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(Original post by Bertiekl77)
I’ve seen this regarding the apprentiships but can’t find any info anywhere else?
It's new, so more information should come out this year at some point. But in the meantime doing the access course seems like it would be a suitable option for you.
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Bertiekl77
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(Original post by lavender_rose)
It's new, so more information should come out this year at some point. But in the meantime doing the access course seems like it would be a suitable option for you.
Thank you. I need to resit three GCSE’s so I’m not sure how I’d fit it all in. ☹️
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lavender_rose
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I would speak to a careers advisor https://nationalcareersservice.direc...ontact-us/home

With Maths and English, as long as it hasn't changed, it you didn't pass you are able to do it free as an adult with the Adult Education service but again you would have to double check on that one.
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Bertiekl77
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(Original post by lavender_rose)
I would speak to a careers advisor https://nationalcareersservice.direc...ontact-us/home

With Maths and English, as long as it hasn't changed, it you didn't pass you are able to do it free as an adult with the Adult Education service but again you would have to double check on that one.
I think I’d have to do two years, 1 Access, then 1 GCSE, then 3 years for the degree. I’d be 46 by the time I’d finish.
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lavender_rose
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(Original post by Bertiekl77)
I think I’d have to do two years, 1 Access, then 1 GCSE, then 3 years for the degree. I’d be 46 by the time I’d finish.
Well I guess then it depends on whether you feel the 5 years will be worth it for the end goal of becoming a midwife. Nothing worth doing is easy for the most part when it comes to careers. There are other at least 3 students in my cohort that are in their 40's so is being 46 on qualifying a big enough deterrent for you?

If you want "quicker" entrance into the maternity field you could look into the roles of the maternity support worker, doula, breastfeeding consultant. I guess it depends how much you want to be a midwife specifically or whether your desire is to work with pregnant women.

I think it also boils down to the role of the midwife, I assume you are already aware of the role but it involves a lot more than is sometimes portrayed and frankly I would question whether an individual (who was not already medically qualified to some degree e.g. a nurse) who has any less than 3 years training would be appropriately qualified for the role?
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Bertiekl77
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(Original post by lavender_rose)
Well I guess then it depends on whether you feel the 5 years will be worth it for the end goal of becoming a midwife. Nothing worth doing is easy for the most part when it comes to careers. There are other at least 3 students in my cohort that are in their 40's so is being 46 on qualifying a big enough deterrent for you?

If you want "quicker" entrance into the maternity field you could look into the roles of the maternity support worker, doula, breastfeeding consultant. I guess it depends how much you want to be a midwife specifically or whether your desire is to work with pregnant women.

I think it also boils down to the role of the midwife, I assume you are already aware of the role but it involves a lot more than is sometimes portrayed and frankly I would question whether an individual (who was not already medically qualified to some degree e.g. a nurse) who has any less than 3 years training would be appropriately qualified for the role?
No they wouldn’t be qualified at all. It’s just if I can squeeze in the Acces course and gcse into one year. I’ve spoke to the National careers service and they have given me some contacts.
I completely understand midwifery isn’t a bed of roses. I had one easy pregnancy that followed with a horrific birth and my second pregnancy was traumatic with a stress free two hour labour. To me it’s first and foremost about the women and impowering them to take control of their pregnancies labour and post baby. The access course is Health and Social Care so if I wasn’t successful with a University application I could use it for HCA perhaps.
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lavender_rose
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(Original post by Bertiekl77)
No they wouldn’t be qualified at all. It’s just if I can squeeze in the Acces course and gcse into one year. I’ve spoke to the National careers service and they have given me some contacts.
I completely understand midwifery isn’t a bed of roses. I had one easy pregnancy that followed with a horrific birth and my second pregnancy was traumatic with a stress free two hour labour. To me it’s first and foremost about the women and impowering them to take control of their pregnancies labour and post baby. The access course is Health and Social Care so if I wasn’t successful with a University application I could use it for HCA perhaps.
That sounds like it could be a plan, doing the access course and GCSE in a year. Sorry, by my statement about the length of training and the role of the midwife I'm not saying that it's not challenging and downright difficult at times (it is don't get me wrong). But I am saying there is a lot of biology involved and it's a lot more scientific and technical then I could have imagined before I started the course. So you definitely do need the 3 years to learn, it's brilliant that you want to empower women - I think the interviewers would be very impressed to hear that. If you were to go down the maternity support worker (MSW) route than while it would be favourable to have the health and social qualification it isn't actually necessary in the entry requirements. You would need to demonstrate literacy and numeracy skills which could be from functional skills numeracy & literacy depending on which hospital you apply to (although as I am aware most would be looking for GCSEs). https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/Exp...support-worker
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Bertiekl77
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(Original post by lavender_rose)
That sounds like it could be a plan, doing the access course and GCSE in a year. Sorry, by my statement about the length of training and the role of the midwife I'm not saying that it's not challenging and downright difficult at times (it is don't get me wrong). But I am saying there is a lot of biology involved and it's a lot more scientific and technical then I could have imagined before I started the course. So you definitely do need the 3 years to learn, it's brilliant that you want to empower women - I think the interviewers would be very impressed to hear that. If you were to go down the maternity support worker (MSW) route than while it would be favourable to have the health and social qualification it isn't actually necessary in the entry requirements. You would need to demonstrate literacy and numeracy skills which could be from functional skills numeracy & literacy depending on which hospital you apply to (although as I am aware most would be looking for GCSEs). https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/Exp...support-worker
Thank you. I’m going to make some calls this week and see how I can go forward with gaining the GCSE I need.
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lavender_rose
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(Original post by Bertiekl77)
Thank you. I’m going to make some calls this week and see how I can go forward with gaining the GCSE I need.
Your welcome, good luck with it. If you have anymore questions please ask away.
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