indigogirl
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#1
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#1
How exactly do you explain the effects of similes, metaphors, etc in a poem/piece of text? Say if you have to explain how they help show the mood of the text? If someone could just give me a general example, it would really help.
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Rogue275
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Report 13 years ago
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Generally similes and metaphors draw comparisons, so they create imagery in the reader's mind. For example (a random quote from Stephen King's 'It'):
"He screamed, clapped one hand to the spot like a man who's just had one hell of a good idea..."
Rather than just saying he clapped his hand to the spot where the character was hit the author uses the simile, which makes the action more vivid for me.
'Like a man who's just had one hell of a good idea' makes me imagine him hitting himself really hard, with a shocked expression, but the author hasn't actually said this.
Whenever you're asked to look at the effect of a simile or metaphor, just read it and think, does it conjure up imagery for you? What effect does it have on you? I can't think of an example that shows mood off the top of my head, but if something is said to 'sound like a creaking door' then you could say that creates suspense, or a creepy mood.
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indigogirl
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#3
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(Original post by Rogue275)
Generally similes and metaphors draw comparisons, so they create imagery in the reader's mind. For example (a random quote from Stephen King's 'It'):
"He screamed, clapped one hand to the spot like a man who's just had one hell of a good idea..."
Rather than just saying he clapped his hand to the spot where the character was hit the author uses the simile, which makes the action more vivid for me.
'Like a man who's just had one hell of a good idea' makes me imagine him hitting himself really hard, with a shocked expression, but the author hasn't actually said this.
Whenever you're asked to look at the effect of a simile or metaphor, just read it and think, does it conjure up imagery for you? What effect does it have on you? I can't think of an example that shows mood off the top of my head, but if something is said to 'sound like a creaking door' then you could say that creates suspense, or a creepy mood.
Thanks so much for your help! Any ideas about alliteration?
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Rogue275
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Again just think about how it makes you feel. There's no set answer because different uses of alliteration will aim to give different effects. A lot of the time alliteration helps a piece flow (particularly in poetry) or adds interest and variety (in prose). In both it often creates a pleasing sound because of the repetition. The mood can be set by alliteration usually depending on which consonant is repeated. For example, sibilance (the reptition of an 's' sound), sounds soothing when read aloud, and so creates a calm mood.
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eternally_law
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#5
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Ok google
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Yes
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