iloveconverse123
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
Just a few questions....

So I currently study a level geology in year 12 but I've only been doing it for a year, However I really enjoy it as a subject and I'm unsure whether I should commit to doing a degree in it over other science degrees like marine biology or biology

So I really enjoy my other science subjects - chemistry and biology - but how much is actually incorporated into the course? Especially chemistry as I really enjoy learning about the different minerals?

Also what is the contact time like - I know this is fairly dependant on the course but which universities are the best for this? (AAB or lower grades)

Additionally, within the degree is it important for me to be good at walking etc as I haven't been on any field trips before and it kinda worries me a bit as to how good i need to be?

Then finally, if I decide to do a geology degree how likely is it that I'll be able to get a placement and eventually a job preferentially not in the oil industry? I.e. how good are the career prospects and what sorts of jobs are available?

Sorry theres so many questions
Thank you
0
reply
username2088165
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
(Original post by iloveconverse123)
Just a few questions....

So I currently study a level geology in year 12 but I've only been doing it for a year, However I really enjoy it as a subject and I'm unsure whether I should commit to doing a degree in it over other science degrees like marine biology or biology

So I really enjoy my other science subjects - chemistry and biology - but how much is actually incorporated into the course? Especially chemistry as I really enjoy learning about the different minerals?
I do a Geoscience degree, and there has been quite a lot of biology and chemistry in the course, more than I expected honestly! We had a whole module dedicated to environmental chemistry, and we've had lots of mineral formulas etc to learn in mineralogy. Biology has also been integrated into the course, with topics such as the origin of life, evolution and biogeography.

Also what is the contact time like - I know this is fairly dependant on the course but which universities are the best for this? (AAB or lower grades)
In my first year (which I've just finished), we had approximately 18 hours of contact time per week, depending on whether we had certain practical classes or not as these changed week to week. There is a tool on the Which? website which compares contact hours of different universities for different courses. It doesn't have every uni (for example, Keele, which is where I go), but it can be good as a rough guide. Geology comes under the Physical Sciences course option

Additionally, within the degree is it important for me to be good at walking etc as I haven't been on any field trips before and it kinda worries me a bit as to how good i need to be?
I'm not going to lie, field trips in geology can be fairly intense physically (especially if you have asthma, like I do). You'll be outside in all weathers for up to 8 hours a day, in all sorts of environments - moorland, mountains, beaches etc depending on where you go. If you have a decent level of fitness though, it should be manageable - if I can do it, anyone can

Then finally, if I decide to do a geology degree how likely is it that I'll be able to get a placement and eventually a job preferentially not in the oil industry? I.e. how good are the career prospects and what sorts of jobs are available?

Sorry theres so many questions
Thank you
I'm not too sure about how good placement and job prospects are for a geology degree as I've only just completed my first year, but from the research I did while choosing my degree, there seems to be a lot of opportunity in sectors such as mining, oil and gas (which I'm not keen on either), engineering and environmental geology, e.g. land remediation. If you go on to do an MSc, and maybe a PhD, then you will have more choice and could go into research in a variety of geological areas.

I hope that helps
1
reply
Plagioclase
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by iloveconverse123)
Just a few questions....

So I currently study a level geology in year 12 but I've only been doing it for a year, However I really enjoy it as a subject and I'm unsure whether I should commit to doing a degree in it over other science degrees like marine biology or biology

So I really enjoy my other science subjects - chemistry and biology - but how much is actually incorporated into the course? Especially chemistry as I really enjoy learning about the different minerals?

Also what is the contact time like - I know this is fairly dependant on the course but which universities are the best for this? (AAB or lower grades)

Additionally, within the degree is it important for me to be good at walking etc as I haven't been on any field trips before and it kinda worries me a bit as to how good i need to be?

Then finally, if I decide to do a geology degree how likely is it that I'll be able to get a placement and eventually a job preferentially not in the oil industry? I.e. how good are the career prospects and what sorts of jobs are available?

Sorry theres so many questions
Thank you
In terms of how much natural science is incorporated into a geology degree, it really depends on where you're doing your course and it would be a good idea to look up the modules that they offer. My degree is pretty hard-science heavy - most of what we do is more applied science to the Earth than traditional geology - but I think it can vary quite a bit by university.

In terms of contact time, I genuinely do not know to what degree this varies by university. You're best off asking individual students at the universities you're interested in. I'd say I typically have 15-20 hours of contact time per week.

As long as you've got a normal level of fitness, you should be fine for field trips. Yes, they can be physically demanding, but not everyone is an athlete and you're not going to be expected to do anything you can't. As long as you're fine with being outside all day, you can tackle walking up hills at a normal pace and you can deal with walking say 10km per day, you should be absolutely fine for most compulsory field trips.

There are plenty of career prospects for geoscience graduates that are not in industry (O&G in particular is decreasing in popularity recently anyway as far as I'm aware).
0
reply
iloveconverse123
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#4
Thank you for all your help I'll definitely research into some courses then!
1
reply
rosiesaurus
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by iloveconverse123)
Just a few questions....

So I currently study a level geology in year 12 but I've only been doing it for a year, However I really enjoy it as a subject and I'm unsure whether I should commit to doing a degree in it over other science degrees like marine biology or biology

So I really enjoy my other science subjects - chemistry and biology - but how much is actually incorporated into the course? Especially chemistry as I really enjoy learning about the different minerals?

Also what is the contact time like - I know this is fairly dependant on the course but which universities are the best for this? (AAB or lower grades)

Additionally, within the degree is it important for me to be good at walking etc as I haven't been on any field trips before and it kinda worries me a bit as to how good i need to be?

Then finally, if I decide to do a geology degree how likely is it that I'll be able to get a placement and eventually a job preferentially not in the oil industry? I.e. how good are the career prospects and what sorts of jobs are available?

Sorry theres so many questions
Thank you
Hi there I finished my geology degree last year so wanted to give some oversight from a graduate!

In terms of chemistry, this has direct application in topics involving minerals because you will be looking at how different elements fit into crystal structures and how physical conditions affect this. This is very applicable in the study igneous and metamorphic rocks and helps you understand the conditions in which they formed/were altered. It also is useful when looking at formation of ore deposits as you'll be thinking about how certain elements can become concentrated and which minerals they are found in/with. You can also use geochemistry to palaeoclimates (bringing in that biology!) by looking at elemental ratios in sediment, ice cores and fossils. These topics tend to come in in more depth in later years of the course, but in first year you will get some kind of intro to atoms, elements and minerals which will ease in people without A Level chem.

Biology is brought in (as you'd expect!) in palaeontoloy. First year palaeo is usually identifying common fossils, learning to observe and sketch them and learn about how/where they lived. More advanced modules cover topics such as evolution, microfossils, palaeoclimates, vertebrates/invertebrates. Quite a few palaeo PhD/lecturers that I know have a first degree in biology/zoology!

Contact hours at most universities will be quite high in first year (around 15-20 hours/week) and will decrease throughout your course (around 10-12 in 3rd year) as you are expected to take on more independent work. In first year our contact hours were mostly practical, where we would sit in large groups around tables to discuss the samples, maps and exercises we were given. I wouldn't say any one university was better for contact hours than another (and I don't think these figures would be publically available anyway!) however what I can tell you is that for a degree to be accredited by the Geological Society there is a requirement to have X many practical hours with rocks, fossils, minerals and maps.

Haha I had exactly the same worry about keeping up in the field, and I was fine. Spain was unpleasant because it was so damn hot, but the lecturers are human too, and they understand! Take plenty of food - fieldwork is an excellent excuse to eat a lot :P

For careers, most graduates that I know are going into geological engineering, geotechnics and environmental geology - you can find positions in these all over the country, pays average (but no boom and bust cycle so stable employment!) and you don't need a masters to get employed! Other options (at the moment you will most likely need an MGeol/MSci or an MSc) include hydrogeology, oil/gas industry, mineral exploration. You can also get into energy consulting, nuclear, aggregates (ie quarries and cement) - the world is your oyster with geology!

Hope this answers everything, give me a shout if you want more advice
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you feel the grades you will receive this year will be fair?

Yes I feel the grades I will receive will be fair (37)
21.89%
No, I don't feel the grades I will receive will be fair (83)
49.11%
I'm unsure (49)
28.99%

Watched Threads

View All