Is the MSc Computer Science (Conversion) greater than the BSc in Computer Science?

Watch
Compyguy33
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
I was wondering whether employers would value the MSc in Computer Science (Conversion) greater than the BSc in Computer Science? Would I be able to apply for jobs that require a 2.1 classification?
0
reply
Compyguy33
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#2
bump
0
reply
username3079870
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
No not really. MSc conversion courses, while demanding, don't cover half of what a BSc in CS covers. BSc students also have the opportunity to get a year of professional experience, which is invaluable in getting jobs.

As someone who has interviewed both, I've found BSc students to generally have a better understanding of CS and more of a passion for tech. Occasionally you find an MSc students like this. Often though it can come across that MSc conversion students just wanted a job or thought tech looked cool. There's nothing wrong with that, but a BSc student who has studied CS for 3/4 years is likely going to be better educated in CS than a conversion student ( in my experience). MSc students tend not to have the same passion or interest in tech as BSc students.

MSc conversion courses exist due to the huge skills gap in the tech sector. They don't always provide the solution though. The last thing the tech sector needs is lacklustre programmers or system engineers that conversion courses sometimes produce. Universities sell the course at a MSc level as getting you do pay for another 3/4 years of uni (for a BSc in CS) is much harder to sell than a one year conversion course.

All that said, I know of MSc conversion grads who have gotten posts that need a 2:1. Employers will generally look more favourably at BSc in CS vs a MSc conversion though. If you get top marks in your MSc you should be fine.
0
reply
Myxc
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by jestersnow)
No not really. MSc conversion courses, while demanding, don't cover half of what a BSc in CS covers...
Universities sell the course at a MSc level as getting you do pay for another 3/4 years of uni (for a BSc in CS) is much harder to sell than a one year conversion course....
... Employers will generally look more favourably at BSc in CS vs a MSc conversion though. If you get top marks in your MSc you should be fine.
Thanks bro you just killed my dreams.
lol jk I'm actually graduating this year (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) and thinking of doing a CompSci MSc. I'm looking at the modules from different unis and yep I'm not really feeling them as much as i thought i would.

one more mediocre software engineer
0
reply
username3079870
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Myxc)
Thanks bro you just killed my dreams.
lol jk I'm actually graduating this year (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) and thinking of doing a CompSci MSc. I'm looking at the modules from different unis and yep I'm not really feeling them as much as i thought i would.

one more mediocre software engineer

Ha ha not a chance I'm sure you'd be ace with an EE degree. I think you are aiming too low though. I did my MSc in Cyber Security, and about 25% of the class had an EE background. They did better than a lot of the class who had Software backgrounds.

I'd also say you'd get on to a lot of MSc Computer Science courses that are not "conversion courses". A lot of them explicitly state they will take undergrads with a EE background. For example the course at QMUL in Software Engineering I think would help you a lot more than a conversion course:

http://www.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/t...es/121465.html

Also at University of Edinburgh, they offer all of the their MSc Computer Science students a revision course in Java at the start of the year for students with little programming experience. It's a great program too, there are 50+ modules to pick from:

http://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/postgra...te/view&id=110

Honestly I think you'd kick yourself if you did a conversion course. Without wanting to sound like a (insert cuss word here), conversion courses are generally suited towards people people from non-STEM backgrounds. If you have an EE degree, you could do an MSc in Software Engineering or MSc in Computer Science no bother. You'd get a lot more out of it and it looks a lot better on the CV.

If you want an easier life (and I don't know your background, so maybe that's the better route for you) do a conversion course. I'm sure you'd get good marks in it, but overall you'd probably find it too easy.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Regarding Ofqual's most recent update, do you think you will be given a fair grade this summer?

Yes (256)
33.82%
No (501)
66.18%

Watched Threads

View All