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    Hey, new to this forum.. anyway

    I've wanted to apply to an American University for a long time now, and am un-sure how to. I have looked up literally hundreds of american colleges/unis sites and just know that I have to take the SATs.

    Do A levels and GCSE performance matter? At GCSE I acheived 9 A's and at AS am sitting on ABC.

    Im not looking to go to an Ivy League as doubt I'm at the standard, but an above average University definitely.

    ANY help you can give to me would be much appreciated, as I am having a lot of difficulty finding information. And my careers teacher thinks its too much of a hassle :s

    cheers
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    Everything that you need should be here:

    http://www.fulbright.co.uk/eas/index.html
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    (Original post by limo1)
    Hey, new to this forum.. anyway

    Do A levels and GCSE performance matter? At GCSE I acheived 9 A's and at AS am sitting on ABC.cheers
    Of course they matter. But yours seem good.

    From the fulbright site linked above:

    "If you are thinking about pursuing an undergraduate degree at a US institution, one of the first considerations you need to make is whether or not you have the minimum entry qualifications. British-educated students are expected to hold at least five GCSEs at grade C or above (or five Scottish Standard Grades) in academic subjects and two or three A levels (or a minimum of three Scottish Highers). Your GCSEs or Standards should usually include English and Maths. Some institutions may accept students with only five or more good GCSEs or Standards provided they are at least 17 years old and have results before applying. Many will give university credit for A levels, though the amount will vary. There are also some institutions that will recognise other UK qualifications, such as GNVQs, GSVQs, HNCs or HNDs. However, as they will not all be familiar with these qualifications, check with each institution to see how they are accepted for admissions purposes."

    The important thing is to check with the schools to which you intend to reply. How much credit will they give for A levels? Some might also want you to take the SAT.
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    (Original post by limo1)
    Hey, new to this forum.. anyway

    I've wanted to apply to an American University for a long time now, and am un-sure how to. I have looked up literally hundreds of american colleges/unis sites and just know that I have to take the SATs.

    Do A levels and GCSE performance matter? At GCSE I acheived 9 A's and at AS am sitting on ABC.

    Im not looking to go to an Ivy League as doubt I'm at the standard, but an above average University definitely.

    ANY help you can give to me would be much appreciated, as I am having a lot of difficulty finding information. And my careers teacher thinks its too much of a hassle :s

    cheers
    speak to Yannis or BazTheMoney
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    I've sent you a PM, check it out.
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    Could you send me that PM as well please?
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    Could you PM me as well, please.
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    I only said to him that if you go to www.golivewire.com and register, there is a college forum there which has a subsection called "applying to college" which is much like an american version of this site!
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    I think you may have to sit the SAT or similiar test regardless of your qualifications to gain entry to US universit. Its something ive also considered.
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    (Original post by limo1)
    Hey, new to this forum.. anyway

    I've wanted to apply to an American University for a long time now, and am un-sure how to. I have looked up literally hundreds of american colleges/unis sites and just know that I have to take the SATs.

    Do A levels and GCSE performance matter? At GCSE I acheived 9 A's and at AS am sitting on ABC.

    Im not looking to go to an Ivy League as doubt I'm at the standard, but an above average University definitely.

    ANY help you can give to me would be much appreciated, as I am having a lot of difficulty finding information. And my careers teacher thinks its too much of a hassle :s

    cheers
    You could end up paying tens of thousands a year in tuition........
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    Is the ACT offered in the UK? Many midwestern universities, and others take these scores instead of the SAT. I found it easier than SATs. It's broader in range (reading, math, science reasoning, and english) than the SAT- but I think they're revamping the SATs this year.

    What sorts of UNIs are you looking at? Generally, the State Universities are cheaper, but maybe not so coming from overseas.

    I think the first thing for you to consider is where exactly in the US do you want to live. Secondly, how large of a school do you want, and do you want to go public or private.

    You may want to check out US News and World Report. US News and World Report does a yearly ranking (that are invariably very controversial.... depending on how well the university ranks!)


    http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/college/cohome.htm

    http://www.campusdirt.com/index.cfm?id=googCSrch

    http://www.princetonreview.com/colle...s/rankings.asp

    http://www.collegeconfidential.com/

    Good luck! If you have any more specific questions about US Colleges, please ask. I prob. won't be v. helpful with applying from Britain though.
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    Just found this:

    Do A-Levels Replace SATs for British Students?


    Question: My daughter is an American citizen, but she has been educated in a British school in London where we live. Will American colleges accept her A-Level test results instead of the SAT?

    The vast majority of colleges that require the SAT of domestic students will also expect it of international students, as well, no matter what other tests they’ve completed nor the results they’ve achieved. You can ask individual schools if they differ on that policy, but it’s unlikely. The ACT can be substituted for the SAT almost everywhere, but the SAT is probably easier to access in the U.K. Go to www.collegeboard.com for details. (Typically students in British schools in and around London take the SAT at the American School in Saint John’s Wood, but there are several other options, depending where you live.)

    The good news, however, is that, while strong A-level results won’t replace standardized test scores, they can often be substituted for the College Board’s Advanced Placement exams and can earn an applicant credit once enrolled. Some students with several high A-level results may even qualify for sophomore status when they matriculate. At Yale University, for instance, freshmen may be awarded the same number of acceleration credits for scores of B or A on their A-level examinations (or for scores of 6 or 7 on higher-level International Baccalaureate examinations) as they would for top scores on the AP tests.

    In fact, if your daughter is accepted by several American colleges or universities, she may find that she is awarded varying amounts of credit at each one for her A-level results, and that may affect her final decision, so be sure to ask at every school and never assume that policies are the same across the board.

    http://www.collegeconfidential.com/d...ves/000124.htm
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    You could end up paying tens of thousands a year in tuition........

    That statement is part of the truth, but only half the truth. I'm coming to Leeds for an MA. It's going to cost me about $16,000 in tuition which is 4x the fees for a domestic UK student. I'm getting no help from the university financially (I knew I wouldn't, not complaining, just stating a fact) whereas most private unis and even some public unis in the U.S. charge the same tuition for international and domestic students and offer financial aid to both domestic and int'l students. In some ways I think the U.S. system is more equitable. I received a $128,000 (4 years at $32,000/year) education from a well respected small liberal arts college for about $10,000 total in loans. I paid nothing up front and had a year to start paying it back. There are kids I know whose parents paid for everything because they could afford it. I know kids that paid nothing because they/we couldn't afford it. Paying based on what your family can afford makes more sense in my mind then everyone paying an artificially low tuition. That's just me though.
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    (Original post by sjb2016)
    You could end up paying tens of thousands a year in tuition........

    That statement is part of the truth, but only half the truth. I'm coming to Leeds for an MA. It's going to cost me about $16,000 in tuition which is 4x the fees for a domestic UK student. I'm getting no help from the university financially (I knew I wouldn't, not complaining, just stating a fact) whereas most private unis and even some public unis in the U.S. charge the same tuition for international and domestic students and offer financial aid to both domestic and int'l students. In some ways I think the U.S. system is more equitable. I received a $128,000 (4 years at $32,000/year) education from a well respected small liberal arts college for about $10,000 total in loans. I paid nothing up front and had a year to start paying it back. There are kids I know whose parents paid for everything because they could afford it. I know kids that paid nothing because they/we couldn't afford it. Paying based on what your family can afford makes more sense in my mind then everyone paying an artificially low tuition. That's just me though.
    These are good points. Often people in the UK assume that it is *always* prohibitively expensive to study in the US. But there's usually a number of ways of reducing the bill. Check for bursaries and scholarships and so on before you make a decision. And be aware that there is a wide range of schools, with a consequently wide range of costs from which to choose.

    The first thing to do would be to try to decide on a geographical area, as well as a type of school: do you want small liberal arts, colossal state school or something in between?


    Edit:typos
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    (Original post by Tajel)
    These are good points. Often people in the UK assume that it is *always* prohibitively expensive to study in the US. But there's usually a number of ways of reducing the bill. Check for bursaries and scholarships and so on before you make a decision. And be aware that there is a wide range of schools, with a consequently wide range of costs from which to choose.
    Yeah, it's impossible to make general statements about the US system because unlike the UK there is so much more variety. Better to choose some places you like and then work out the costs for each one than to think about costs first and then thetitution.
 
 
 
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