Why I'm voting Conservative Watch

username2766878
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1) Fiscal prudence. The Conservatives are the only political party to remember that we cannot continue to live beyond our means. The level of national debt is a source of shame for all of us. The Conservatives inherited a very difficult state of public finances in 2010 and have made a combative effort to reducing it given the circumstances they were in. Corbyn offers no credible explanation as to how he plans to reduce the deficit, his policy proposals on the contrary would increase the deficit. True, the Tories doubled the national debt, but only because of what they inherited. Austerity is a necessary evil, Blair's first term ran healthy surpluses sticking to it before running deficits in his second and third term.

2) Brexit. The decision to leave the EU was an important step forward in the preservation of our national sovereignty and re-engagement with the wider world. Now we need to implement it. Corbyn may himself be Eurosceptic (and secretly a Leaver I suspect) but the Labour Party is filled with Europhiles who would be incapable of putting Britain's national interest first during the Brexit negotiations. My local Labour MP voted against triggering Article 50 and wants an even more hardline Europhile deal than Corbyn does. Corbyn will never be able to sell leaving the single market to the parliamentary Labour party. Moreover, Labour's Brexit policy is confused. Only a few months back, Keir Starmer made the idiotic and frankly unworkable suggestion that the UK should see remaining in a "reformed customs union" as an option. Whether he misunderstood what the customs union actually was or was trying to parrot the Prime Minister's position that we should try and come to an agreement on customs, we will never know.

3) The Corbyn factor. Jeremy Corbyn's historical affinity for the IRA is unforgiveable. Of course today as his links come under scrutiny, he tries to spin it as him having the foresight to begin the dialogue which ended the conflict. This is dishonest revisionism. Corbyn did not encourage negotiation, he wanted Britain to withdraw from Northern Ireland altogether and lent the IRA political support. The security services infiltrating the IRA and backing its leadership into a corner+the efforts of the Major and Blair government did far more than Corbyn did to bring peace to Northern Ireland. When a neo-fascist Argentine dictator sent troops to occupy the Falklands, Corbyn claimed that the war was a "Tory plot". Even staunch socialist Michael Foot supported Britain's use of force to liberate the island. Amongst other things, calling terrorists your "friends" and dismissing it as "inclusive language" is unacceptable. Corbyn may get it right on issues of foreign intervention and regime change, but I can't find a patriotic bone in his body.

4) Friendly environment for business. Only the Conservatives can ensure continuity of business friendly policies which have delivered a jobs miracle. The UK's unemployment rate is one of the lowest in the EU because we have a flexible labour market and low corporation tax. High skilled workers don't need to worry about being over taxed. Corbyn's suggestion that he would raise taxes on the top 5% of earners is fiscally useless given that this bracket already pays nearly half of all income tax, room for more revenue from this group is limited. Once again, this displays the left's desire to punish the successful. Scrapping zero hours contracts simply makes it harder for those looking for flexible work to find it. A lot of students will lose their part-time jobs without them. Zero hours contracts only accounts for a fraction of the labour force, Corbyn putting it front and centre of his labour market reform agenda shows that he's not serious about the job.

Are the Conservatives perfect? No. But they're a hell of a lot more rational and long-termist than Corbyn who seems to have confused a larger public sector with capital investment and unapologetically associates himself with people who hate us.
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Drez999
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(Original post by Sycatonne23)
1) Fiscal prudence. The Conservatives are the only political party to remember that we cannot continue to live beyond our means. The level of national debt is a source of shame for all of us. The Conservatives inherited a very difficult state of public finances in 2010 and have made a combative effort to reducing it given the circumstances they were in. Corbyn offers no credible explanation as to how he plans to reduce the deficit, his policy proposals on the contrary would increase the deficit. True, the Tories doubled the national debt, but only because of what they inherited. Austerity is a necessary evil, Blair's first term ran healthy surpluses sticking to it before running deficits in his second and third term.

2) Brexit. The decision to leave the EU was an important step forward in the preservation of our national sovereignty and re-engagement with the wider world. Now we need to implement it. Corbyn may himself be Eurosceptic (and secretly a Leaver I suspect) but the Labour Party is filled with Europhiles who would be incapable of putting Britain's national interest first during the Brexit negotiations. My local Labour MP voted against triggering Article 50 and wants an even more hardline Europhile deal than Corbyn does. Corbyn will never be able to sell leaving the single market to the parliamentary Labour party. Moreover, Labour's Brexit policy is confused. Only a few months back, Keir Starmer made the idiotic and frankly unworkable suggestion that the UK should see remaining in a "reformed customs union" as an option. Whether he misunderstood what the customs union actually was or was trying to parrot the Prime Minister's position that we should try and come to an agreement on customs, we will never know.

3) The Corbyn factor. Jeremy Corbyn's historical affinity for the IRA is unforgiveable. Of course today as his links come under scrutiny, he tries to spin it as him having the foresight to begin the dialogue which ended the conflict. This is dishonest revisionism. Corbyn did not encourage negotiation, he wanted Britain to withdraw from Northern Ireland altogether and lent the IRA political support. The security services infiltrating the IRA and backing its leadership into a corner+the efforts of the Major and Blair government did far more than Corbyn did to bring peace to Northern Ireland. When a neo-fascist Argentine dictator sent troops to occupy the Falklands, Corbyn claimed that the war was a "Tory plot". Even staunch socialist Michael Foot supported Britain's use of force to liberate the island. Amongst other things, calling terrorists your "friends" and dismissing it as "inclusive language" is unacceptable. Corbyn may get it right on issues of foreign intervention and regime change, but I can't find a patriotic bone in his body.

4) Friendly environment for business. Only the Conservatives can ensure continuity of business friendly policies which have delivered a jobs miracle. The UK's unemployment rate is one of the lowest in the EU because we have a flexible labour market and low corporation tax. High skilled workers don't need to worry about being over taxed. Corbyn's suggestion that he would raise taxes on the top 5% of earners is fiscally useless given that this bracket already pays nearly half of all income tax, room for more revenue from this group is limited. Once again, this displays the left's desire to punish the successful. Scrapping zero hours contracts simply makes it harder for those looking for flexible work to find it. A lot of students will lose their part-time jobs without them. Zero hours contracts only accounts for a fraction of the labour force, Corbyn putting it front and centre of his labour market reform agenda shows that he's not serious about the job.

Are the Conservatives perfect? No. But they're a hell of a lot more rational and long-termist than Corbyn who seems to have confused a larger public sector with capital investment and unapologetically associates himself with people who hate us.
Okay, sounds like you have made your mind up
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username2766878
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(Original post by Drez999)
Okay, sounds like you have made your mind up
As indeed I hope you make your mind up along the same lines!
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missedhit
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(Original post by Sycatonne23)
1) Fiscal prudence. The Conservatives are the only political party to remember that we cannot continue to live beyond our means. The level of national debt is a source of shame for all of us. The Conservatives inherited a very difficult state of public finances in 2010 and have made a combative effort to reducing it given the circumstances they were in. Corbyn offers no credible explanation as to how he plans to reduce the deficit, his policy proposals on the contrary would increase the deficit. True, the Tories doubled the national debt, but only because of what they inherited. Austerity is a necessary evil, Blair's first term ran healthy surpluses sticking to it before running deficits in his second and third term.

2) Brexit. The decision to leave the EU was an important step forward in the preservation of our national sovereignty and re-engagement with the wider world. Now we need to implement it. Corbyn may himself be Eurosceptic (and secretly a Leaver I suspect) but the Labour Party is filled with Europhiles who would be incapable of putting Britain's national interest first during the Brexit negotiations. My local Labour MP voted against triggering Article 50 and wants an even more hardline Europhile deal than Corbyn does. Corbyn will never be able to sell leaving the single market to the parliamentary Labour party. Moreover, Labour's Brexit policy is confused. Only a few months back, Keir Starmer made the idiotic and frankly unworkable suggestion that the UK should see remaining in a "reformed customs union" as an option. Whether he misunderstood what the customs union actually was or was trying to parrot the Prime Minister's position that we should try and come to an agreement on customs, we will never know.

3) The Corbyn factor. Jeremy Corbyn's historical affinity for the IRA is unforgiveable. Of course today as his links come under scrutiny, he tries to spin it as him having the foresight to begin the dialogue which ended the conflict. This is dishonest revisionism. Corbyn did not encourage negotiation, he wanted Britain to withdraw from Northern Ireland altogether and lent the IRA political support. The security services infiltrating the IRA and backing its leadership into a corner+the efforts of the Major and Blair government did far more than Corbyn did to bring peace to Northern Ireland. When a neo-fascist Argentine dictator sent troops to occupy the Falklands, Corbyn claimed that the war was a "Tory plot". Even staunch socialist Michael Foot supported Britain's use of force to liberate the island. Amongst other things, calling terrorists your "friends" and dismissing it as "inclusive language" is unacceptable. Corbyn may get it right on issues of foreign intervention and regime change, but I can't find a patriotic bone in his body.

4) Friendly environment for business. Only the Conservatives can ensure continuity of business friendly policies which have delivered a jobs miracle. The UK's unemployment rate is one of the lowest in the EU because we have a flexible labour market and low corporation tax. High skilled workers don't need to worry about being over taxed. Corbyn's suggestion that he would raise taxes on the top 5% of earners is fiscally useless given that this bracket already pays nearly half of all income tax, room for more revenue from this group is limited. Once again, this displays the left's desire to punish the successful. Scrapping zero hours contracts simply makes it harder for those looking for flexible work to find it. A lot of students will lose their part-time jobs without them. Zero hours contracts only accounts for a fraction of the labour force, Corbyn putting it front and centre of his labour market reform agenda shows that he's not serious about the job.

Are the Conservatives perfect? No. But they're a hell of a lot more rational and long-termist than Corbyn who seems to have confused a larger public sector with capital investment and unapologetically associates himself with people who hate us.
1) BS. Conservatives push this argument around like dung beetles treating people like idiots. They keep talking about balancing books and their skill at managing finances but year after year deficits continue and their aim dates for balancing books is pushed further and further into the future.

2) BS. There is only a small faction of well connected (to donors), and thus powerful, backbench Tory politicians that push the Brexit agenda forward. Theresa May is a Remainer, Hammond is a Remainer, i.e. the two (supposedly) most powerful politicians in this country right now. As we have seen with Greece, nothing can be achieved with the EU when you threat them. Arguably, nothing can be achieved with the EU at all. Our PM has taken a totally wrong approach so far.

3) BS. Jeremy Corbyn has a long history of talks with our adversaries to ease the conflicts and get people talking. As a backbencher he has achieved more in the war against terror than any other politician in the House of Commons right now. Unlike the negotiations guru Trump, Corbyn knows that to turn negative attitudes into more lenient, positive ones, you sometimes must call your adversaries your ''friends'' so they feel more connected to you, putting their guards down. I thought this is basic. I learned about this in GCSE Business classes.

4) BS. The left doesn't want to punish the successful, considering that Labour wants to raise tax to a level that will still be the lowest among the major economies around the world. You can hardly think that Labour wants to punish the corporations and wealthy individuals when the tax code will be more favourable than in America. While corporations invest in our country, producing ROI leading to growth, rich people save money, resulting in no ROI and therefore no benefit for the country at large. Corbyn wants to raise tax on the corporations and the wealthy by a few percent to fund the NHS so people won't suffer while waiting in a 6 hour hospital queue and children won't grow up thick because of large uncontrollable school classes and a lack of pens and pencils necessary to be taught appropriately. That's fair, isn't it? Zero hour contracts will not be banned, as you would know if you read the manifesto. Students and others favouring flexible working will be able to ask for that from employers BUT on their own terms. No longer will companies be forcing people to live in uncertainty and fear of whether they'll earn enough to feed their children.

It's the Tories that are short to medium-term politicians that lead the country to a state of ''everyone for themselves'', creating a fractious society. Labour wants to establish the National Investment Bank with regional offices to support businesses, create jobs and thus stimulate growth across the country, not just in London. That's a long-term solution. Creating a sustainable way of funding that returns the ROI back to the taxpayers, establishing a cycle of investment and growth.

Read some more and maybe use the Vote for Policy website. Don't let the right-wing media and the loud voices shape your view of the world. There's still time to make up your mind and make an informed choice.
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georgethelad
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Yeah, I'll be voting for the conservatives too!
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Diogenes4
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Me too. I can't see how anyone would vote to put Diane Abbott in charge of our nations security. And Corbyn's foreign policy would be a disaster.
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PilgrimOfTruth
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OP is a slam dunk.

Labour is unelectable. Unfit to govern at this time.
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username2337287
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We must priortise the British economy, the 23% projected rise in corpral tax is not friendly or encouraging to large scale corpartions. Although, they may not contrinute large amounts of revenue into our economy, the major concern is that they contribute to British Employment. Therefore, the anti-corpral policies adopted by Corbyn, as reflected throughout his manifesto, will discourage private investment. Declining our infrastructure, causing unemployment and causing econmi decline. To add fuel to the fire, without a strong negotiations stance in Brexit agreements, (given that Corbyn is unprepapred and ill experienced with negotiation with the Eu) It consequently, will have a negative multiplier effect. Since companies will invest within EU nations, as a result of the freedom of movement. Should we elect Corbyn to destroy our economy? How will he pay tuition fees?
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username2337287
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(Original post by Diogenes4)
Me too. I can't see how anyone would vote to put Diane Abbott in charge of our nations security. And Corbyn's foreign policy would be a disaster.
Agreed, in light of recent events, we need to focus and priortise British security, therefore securing the safety of our people. Why should we allow terrorists to freely roam around our streets amongst the innocent?
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Diogenes4
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(Original post by Science99999)
We must priortise the British economy, the 23% projected rise in corpral tax is not friendly or encouraging to large scale corpartions. Although, they may not contrinute large amounts of revenue into our economy, the major concern is that they contribute to British Employment. Therefore, the anti-corpral policies adopted by Corbyn, as reflected throughout his manifesto, will discourage private investment. Declining our infrastructure, causing unemployment and causing econmi decline. To add fuel to the fire, without a strong negotiations stance in Brexit agreements, (given that Corbyn is unprepapred and ill experienced with negotiation with the Eu) It consequently, will have a negative multiplier effect. Since companies will invest within EU nations, as a result of the freedom of movement. Should we elect Corbyn to destroy our economy? How will he pay tuition fees?
Exactly. In the post-brexit climate it's ever more important that we are attracting and keeping businesses here. Labours plans suggest businesses wont change their behaviour - they will. It could even reduce tax reciepts. When the conservatives put corporation tax down tax receipts actually went up, we have seen record investment and record employment. Taxes are paid by people. Putting up corporation tax harms not just businesses, but investment, wages and jobs.

On tuition fees the answer is labours magic money tree. I also haven't seen anybody point out that Labour would pay them for every student - even those of rich parents, it just makes no sense. Same with free school meals it's for everyone. Less well off people are paying taxes for rich kids to go to university and have free school meals.
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username2766878
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(Original post by missedhit)
1) BS. Conservatives push this argument around like dung beetles treating people like idiots. They keep talking about balancing books and their skill at managing finances but year after year deficits continue and their aim dates for balancing books is pushed further and further into the future.

2) BS. There is only a small faction of well connected (to donors), and thus powerful, backbench Tory politicians that push the Brexit agenda forward. Theresa May is a Remainer, Hammond is a Remainer, i.e. the two (supposedly) most powerful politicians in this country right now. As we have seen with Greece, nothing can be achieved with the EU when you threat them. Arguably, nothing can be achieved with the EU at all. Our PM has taken a totally wrong approach so far.

3) BS. Jeremy Corbyn has a long history of talks with our adversaries to ease the conflicts and get people talking. As a backbencher he has achieved more in the war against terror than any other politician in the House of Commons right now. Unlike the negotiations guru Trump, Corbyn knows that to turn negative attitudes into more lenient, positive ones, you sometimes must call your adversaries your ''friends'' so they feel more connected to you, putting their guards down. I thought this is basic. I learned about this in GCSE Business classes.

4) BS. The left doesn't want to punish the successful, considering that Labour wants to raise tax to a level that will still be the lowest among the major economies around the world. You can hardly think that Labour wants to punish the corporations and wealthy individuals when the tax code will be more favourable than in America. While corporations invest in our country, producing ROI leading to growth, rich people save money, resulting in no ROI and therefore no benefit for the country at large. Corbyn wants to raise tax on the corporations and the wealthy by a few percent to fund the NHS so people won't suffer while waiting in a 6 hour hospital queue and children won't grow up thick because of large uncontrollable school classes and a lack of pens and pencils necessary to be taught appropriately. That's fair, isn't it? Zero hour contracts will not be banned, as you would know if you read the manifesto. Students and others favouring flexible working will be able to ask for that from employers BUT on their own terms. No longer will companies be forcing people to live in uncertainty and fear of whether they'll earn enough to feed their children.

It's the Tories that are short to medium-term politicians that lead the country to a state of ''everyone for themselves'', creating a fractious society. Labour wants to establish the National Investment Bank with regional offices to support businesses, create jobs and thus stimulate growth across the country, not just in London. That's a long-term solution. Creating a sustainable way of funding that returns the ROI back to the taxpayers, establishing a cycle of investment and growth.

Read some more and maybe use the Vote for Policy website. Don't let the right-wing media and the loud voices shape your view of the world. There's still time to make up your mind and make an informed choice.
1) If the Tories are doing badly with cutting the deficit, then I fail to see how Corbyn can do better. This is some form of inverted logic, his agenda is all about more spending.

2) Our PM has said we need to do a free trade agreement with the EU outside of the single market and customs union, mirroring how bilateral trade works across the rest of the world. This is the best option for Brexit which fulfills the spirit of the Brexit vote. Our PM may be a Remainer but she sees that we cannot remain artificially attached to the EU in all but name, if only other remainers would see this to.

3) Historical revisionism. Corbyn didn't bring about negotiations with the IRA, he didn't even encourage dialogue, he wanted withdrawal and supported the IRA's political objectives. It's there in his parliamentary statements and previous speeches. Anybody claiming that Corbyn bootlicking the IRA at the funerals of IRA militants who killed innocent British people brought about peace in NI lacks understanding of the history and politics of the Troubles and should revisit the textbook.

4) Forgive me, but somebody earning between £80k-150k isn't "wealthy", especially if you live in London. The top 5% of earners already pay 50% of income tax, there is a point beyond which tax rates simply encourage brain drain and revenue falls. Corbyn's approach to high earners reflects his class warfarist attitude to business. I haven't seen a single pro business policy in his manifesto. All he wants to do is extract wealth from the private sector and transfer it to the public sector. The reason so many corporations headquarter here is to escape the tax rates of other countries. Look at Ireland, it works the same way there. This is how you be competitive in the modern world where capital doesn't respect borders. I'm all in favour of tax code simplification to close loopholes, but unfortunately that isn't on any party's agenda.

National Investment Bank? You mean entrusting hundreds of billions of pounds of borrowed money with government bureaucrats to spend as they see fit? We're not in a deflationary gap, this won't have any impact in the real economy asides from further saddling us with debt and causing rampant inflation.

If it sounds too good to be true, it is. I'll be honest, the Tory manifesto isn't particularly brilliant but it's grounded in the real world which is something I can't say about Labour's manifesto.
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DJKL
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(Original post by Sycatonne23)
1)

National Investment Bank? You mean entrusting hundreds of billions of pounds of borrowed money with government bureaucrats to spend as they see fit? We're not in a deflationary gap, this won't have any impact in the real economy asides from further saddling us with debt and causing rampant inflation.
Properly managed and executed this is one of the most sensible policies I have seen. I have spent the last seven years refinancing my employers, the mainstream lending banks are frankly shocking with their stop start lending, their limited time horizons re payback. There is a massive need for lending to smaller business entities,(£100,000-£15,000,000 range) not served and not likely to be served by the present banks (with the ofdd exception)

You want houses built, well outside boom areas like the south east / main cities how much bank lending has been available to smaller/medium builders (those that survived the crash) ,next to none, at one point the only decent lender was Close and they were cherry picking.

Yes they lend to student accomodation spec builders (the next bubble, you heard it here first) but try building houses/flats outwith main cities and it is near impossible. We sold on (with enormous losses) sites with planning use for 60 houses because no lender would touch them.

Germany in the 1980s and 1990s had a model where banks were embedded with business, relationship managers attended board meetings, they were involved in the process, often long term, of developing the vision-even if payback was 5 or more years they backed such propositions and look at them now, their industrial model, union representation, bank /finance involvement.

Frankly for years we have has a laissez faire attitude to this, short term initiatives, headline grabbing low tax rates, these are not the problem, if I can get funding to build 60 units to make say £3,000,000 profit but have to suffer higher tax as a cost, great, not a problem, because getting to retain 74% of £3m is better than getting 83% of nothing.

Here in the real world ,where smaller entities try to grow (the market I have served for 30 years) ,whilst tax rates can be annoying, and are certainly planned around, they tend not to be the main driver of growth, access to funding is the key to growth and this, if they do it right, if it is not just backing of signature projects, is exactly what we need.

Frankly it is what the Conservatives , as the purported party for smaller business (as they once were) ought to have recognised, I am hardly a socialist in my views but instead a natural Conservative voter who can see that their vision is lacking, they just do not recognise the real world outwith their city friends.

If business lending in the economy is fine why does the likes of Funding Circle prosper, they prosper because there is an enormous great void where the high street lenders and others ought to be.
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username2808800
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I agree
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Joep95
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The tories are not a good party, the best out of a bad bunch but still not good
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username2957542
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I agree with u and dats y I am gonna vote for the Conservative party, mainly Immigration being the reason !!!
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WillPhillips
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Nice job, I completely agree
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27121991
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Completely agree with you, good post. My vote is done and dusted
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