ScotStudent899
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
CfE HIGHER PHYSICS 2017/18

Hello everyone!

Welcome to the Higher Physics thread. This is a thread for those who are studying Higher Physics for the term of 2017/18. You are welcomed to use this thread to discuss and ask questions on different aspects of the course and also suggest difference resources. Anyone who had previously studied the course would also be more than welcome to provide any help or advice as well as sharing their experience of the subject as a whole.

So who's studying this course this year?
2
reply
Bio 7
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by ScotStudent899)
CfE HIGHER PHYSICS 2017/18

Hello everyone!

Welcome to the Higher Physics thread. This is a thread for those who are studying Higher Physics for the term of 2017/18. You are welcomed to use this thread to discuss and ask questions on different aspects of the course and also suggest difference resources. Anyone who had previously studied the course would also be more than welcome to provide any help or advice as well as sharing their experience of the subject as a whole.

So who's studying this course this year?
I did the course last year and ended with a B so I can try to help if anyone has questions they want to ask.
0
reply
pleaseentername
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
Also did it last year, got an A band 1. The How To Pass book for higher physics is great, covers about 95% of the essential stuff you need to know - so I'd really recommend it. The questions in the book I didn't really do much of though, but the worked examples and the notes in general were extremely useful to me.

Make sure to do all past papers, specimen and exempler papers. The Hodder Gibson model papers are great too and do them if you can. I think you can find some online for free.

I'd recommend just memorising the answers or process to some of the written questions (as well as understanding it!), as the same ones or similar ones seems to appear year after year. Same with some of the calculations. Examples include explaining how minima are produced, how the question appears and is worded are different but it's ones of those questions that always comes up.

don't ask me about the 2017 open ended question about traffic congestion, that was a joke!
0
reply
Hey234
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
Name:  image.jpg
Views: 392
Size:  503.0 KBI need help with question 8 on this page, the wording of the question just catch me out, can anyone explain how to do it.
0
reply
pleaseentername
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Hey234)
Name:  image.jpg
Views: 392
Size:  503.0 KBI need help with question 8 on this page, the wording of the question just catch me out, can anyone explain how to do it.
Sat physics last year, if my memory is right this is how you do it:

P = mv (momentum = mass * velocity)

And the total momentum before a collision is equal to the total momentum after a collision, if you exclude external forces. To get total momentum for either before or after, just add the momentum of each individual car.

total momentum before collision = total momentum after

First find the total momentum before collision.
P = (1200 * 10) + (800 * 9) = 19200
P(before) = 19200

Find the total momentum after collision:
P = (800 * 11) + (1200v) = 8800 + 1200v
P(after) = 8800 + 1200v

So:

19200 = 8800 + 1200v
19200 - 8800 = 1200v
10400 = 1200v
v = 10400 / 1200
v = 8.67 ms^-1
0
reply
Hey234
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
I figured it out now, thanks.
0
reply
Hey234
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
Name:  image.jpg
Views: 362
Size:  504.7 KBI need help with question 5 of all part as I don't understand the physics behind it, can anybody help me?
0
reply
Hey234
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
Name:  Untitled.png
Views: 403
Size:  240.8 KBI need help with this question part a and part b, thanks.
0
reply
ferm4t
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by Hey234)
Name:  Untitled.png
Views: 403
Size:  240.8 KBI need help with this question part a and part b, thanks.


cant check answers rn but im sure you can find the marking scheme. should be correct anyway
0
reply
Bio 7
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
I wrote this in the Advanced Higher Biology 2016/17 thread on page 7 when someone asked about it and it seemed to help us both learn how to use the rule. I’ve decided to post it here in case someone later in the year gets stuck and this may help.

"Looking at it again though the thumb is for the force, the first finger is the field direction and the second finger the current. The left hand is used for positive charges and when you have a question it should show you the direction of the magnetic field. In this case if it is into the page you would need to have your first finger pointing into the page. It will also help to note that it always points north to south in terms of fields. If you are told the current, then you can point your second finger in that direction. I assume it can also be taken as the direction the particle is travelling before entering the field. Then you have your hand arranged for seeing which direction it is moving in now.

**Looking at the 2016 Q8d it asks about the direction and says the field is into the page. You would point your first finger into the page. The current is going to the right as that was the direction the particle was moving before entering the field. Once you are arranged your thumb is pointing upwards which means that is where it will be travelling now as the new direction. The answer scheme says up the page so that’s what you would be writing. Simple as that I think. Those sorts of questions I believe are asked very straight forward so you will know to use it when it asks about that. The right-hand rule is just the same but for negative particles."
2
reply
Seharxx
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
Seeing this is giving me horrific flashbacks to last year ew ew ew
0
reply
mest234
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
Can anyone give me a simplier explanation of semi conductor and band theory diagram?
0
reply
Hey234
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#13
Report 2 years ago
#13
Name:  Untitled.png
Views: 380
Size:  28.4 KB

never seen this question, how to do it?
0
reply
Hey234
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 years ago
#14
Name:  Untitled.png
Views: 290
Size:  46.6 KB
Can anyone explains me this diagram?
0
reply
blain2001
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#15
Report 2 years ago
#15
Can someone help me with 2017 paper 1 q 1 LOL!
0
reply
ferm4t
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#16
Report 2 years ago
#16
(Original post by blain2001)
Can someone help me with 2017 paper 1 q 1 LOL!
Acceleration is change in velocity over time, so

a=Δv/Δt

Two points are clearly labeled as (v1,t1), (v2,t2) or (5m/s, 2s), (10m/s,8s)

a = (v2-v1)/(t2-t1) = ((10-5)m/s)/((8-2)s) = 0.83m/s^2
0
reply
blain2001
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#17
Report 2 years ago
#17
i managed to work it out in the end but thanks sm !!
0
reply
rittyt22
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#18
Report 2 years ago
#18
Unit 1 http://clydeviewacademy.inverclyde.s...8AHwANQA3AHwA0

Unit 2 http://clydeviewacademy.inverclyde.s...8AHwANQA3AHwA0

Unit 3 http://clydeviewacademy.inverclyde.s...8AHwANQA3AHwA0

Researching Physics https://www.edubuzz.org/prestonlodge...cphy_unit4.pdf

Units, Prefixes etc http://clydeviewacademy.inverclyde.s...8AHwANQA3AHwA0
0
reply
Hey234
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#19
Report 2 years ago
#19
Can anybody explains to me of the definition of tension and how to calculate tension thanks.
0
reply
ferm4t
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#20
Report 2 years ago
#20
(Original post by Hey234)
Can anybody explains to me of the definition of tension and how to calculate tension thanks.
I struggled so much with this, but going over it differently at uni helped me a lot. Luckily for you I have my tension notes saved.

Tension is an internal force, it acts inside a rope (or whatever is under tension). Whenever there is a force applied between connected bodies tension is between the bodies.

If you want to consider the 'direction' of the tension vector, draw arrows pointing towards the centre of the rope. In general, tension is the same at every point on a perfect rope. So if you have a rope that changes direction (ie goes over a slope) then the direction of the tension vector changes for one body but not the other.

For example if two bodies are connected by a rope and dragged along a flat surface,



clearly tension acts in one direction when you consider Body 1 but another way when you consider Body 2.

Another example, here the Tension acts vertically down on Body 2 and up the slope on Body 1.

0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    PGCE Open day Postgraduate
    Sat, 29 Feb '20
  • Edinburgh Napier University
    Postgraduate Drop-in Brunch Postgraduate
    Sat, 29 Feb '20
  • Teesside University
    All faculties open Undergraduate
    Sat, 29 Feb '20

Do you get study leave?

Yes- I like it (431)
58.64%
Yes- I don't like it (40)
5.44%
No- I want it (214)
29.12%
No- I don't want it (50)
6.8%

Watched Threads

View All