Renault ZOE or similar electric car as a first car?

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Thomas Pegler
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I would like to know if buying a second-hand electric car, e.g. Renault ZOE. Is a thing people are doing, or if the insurance is still too high for EVs.
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Jackieox
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(Original post by Thomas Pegler)
I would like to know if buying a second-hand electric car, e.g. Renault ZOE. Is a thing people are doing, or if the insurance is still too high for EVs.
Personally i'd just avoid electric cars altogether. The insurance is more than a non electric plus they take ages to charge (I know some can charge in like 15 minutes or so) but still do you really wanna be standing outside in the rain waiting for it to charge?

You have a lot more choice with a non electric.
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RoyalSheepy
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Have you considered Hybrids? The need for fully electric cars, unless you're getting a Tesla, is still way to early IMO.
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Nuffles
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Depending on your needs, if you can live with an electric car then a Zoe would be the one to get at the moment. Due to Renault miscalculating their residual value on their promoted PCP agreements when that model first came out, you can pick up a Zoe which is only a couple of years old without many miles for £5-6000. Absolute steal if electric cars are your thing.
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PTMalewski
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An electric car has much simpler construction and should be much more reliable for this reason, than the conventional car.
If such was avaible for a reasonable price, and specs were sufficient for my needs (mind that actual range will be lower than declared, especially in a car that has a couple of years), I would have taken it already.
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GenialGermanGent
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(Original post by Jackieox)
[..] but still do you really wanna be standing outside in the rain waiting for it to charge?
Or you could -careful, revolutionary thought here- sit inside the car while it's charging when it's raining! That is, if you didn't plan ahead properly and actually have wait for it to charge. If you charge it overnight or during the day at/close to your school, uni, or work, you should never have that situation.
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GenialGermanGent
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(Original post by Thomas Pegler)
I would like to know if buying a second-hand electric car, e.g. Renault ZOE. Is a thing people are doing, or if the insurance is still too high for EVs.
Don't know about insurance, but note that with some EVs you can only lease and not outright buy the battery. This might not be something you want to do if you don't have a steady income yet.
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Jackieox
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(Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
Or you could -careful, revolutionary thought here- sit inside the car while it's charging when it's raining! That is, if you didn't plan ahead properly and actually have wait for it to charge. If you charge it overnight or during the day at/close to your school, uni, or work, you should never have that situation.
Sounds like a great time, just sitting in the car for ages waiting for it to charge =L Okay so what if you have a job like mine which frequently requires you to do a lot of driving?

Also...it's not always possible for people to get a charging station at home.
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GenialGermanGent
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(Original post by Jackieox)
Sounds like a great time, just sitting in the car for ages waiting for it to charge =L
For ages? Your example was 15 minutes. And again, if you do minimal planning ahead, you shouldn't have to wait for the car to charge.

(Original post by Jackieox)
Okay so what if you have a job like mine which frequently requires you to do a lot of driving?
Then you should get a better job! Probably not relevant to the OP.

(Original post by Jackieox)
Also...it's not always possible for people to get a charging station at home.
True, but for many it is, and the charging network is getting denser, many people have one close to home (or school/uni/work).
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Jackieox
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(Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
For ages? Your example was 15 minutes. And again, if you do minimal planning ahead, you shouldn't have to wait for the car to charge.



Then you should get a better job! Probably not relevant to the OP.



True, but for many it is, and the charging network is getting denser, many people have one close to home (or school/uni/work).
15 minutes is a long time to just sit there playing on your phone especially if you've got a long drive and just want to get home. For example my drive home from uni is just under 2 hours, i'd rather do it in 2 hours and get home than have to stop and wait for my car to charge when it takes me literally less than 5 to currently fill my car.

I work for my uni and I love what I do. Also get paid really well for it. I'm gaining experience relevant to my future career. But loads of people travel around for work. Even if they're mostly based in one location it's highly likely (especially if it's a big company) that you'll be required to travel occasionally.

"Close to home" yeah but i'd feel a bit uncomfortable leaving my car charging overnight at a random charging point a mile away.
Take my uni for example, there isn't an electric charge point at the uni or in the town centre itself. So if i got an electric car you're saying I should leave it at the petrol station (which is the nearest charge point) and walk the four miles back to my house?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Thomas Pegler)
I would like to know if buying a second-hand electric car, e.g. Renault ZOE. Is a thing people are doing, or if the insurance is still too high for EVs.
You need to look at the battery warranty in a second-hand car. I believe they are ferociously expensive if they need replacing out of warranty, and this could make quite a dent in your savings from petrol.

You also need to consider what range the car has on a full charge (bearing in mind the age of the battery), and whether that's going to fulfil your needs comfortably. For instance, if you regularly commute futher than the average range allows, do you have time to stop en route to charge it? Are there charging points where you regularly leave your car, or are they as rare as a hen's tooth? At home, what are the practicalities for charging - do you have an easily -accessible socket in a garage for instance, or is it going to involve trailing wires all over the place, possibly in the rain?
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GenialGermanGent
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(Original post by Jackieox)
15 minutes is a long time to just sit there playing on your phone especially if you've got a long drive and just want to get home.
Not really, you can answer emails on your phone or watch a video or two about the ecological benefits of electric cars. And if you have a long drive ahead and didn't charge the car up then you deserve to wait. This is irrespective of the fact that an electric car is probably not for you if you regularly drive long distances (which the OP never indicated she/he would).

(Original post by Jackieox)
For example my drive home from uni is just under 2 hours, i'd rather do it in 2 hours and get home than have to stop and wait for my car to charge when it takes me literally less than 5 to currently fill my car.
We're going off topic, but living that far from your uni is idiotic. And again, with only traces of an IQ, you will have a fully charged EV when you want to do longer drives.

(Original post by Jackieox)
I work for my uni and I love what I do. Also get paid really well for it. I'm gaining experience relevant to my future career.
Good for you.

(Original post by Jackieox)
But loads of people travel around for work. Even if they're mostly based in one location it's highly likely (especially if it's a big company) that you'll be required to travel occasionally.

Most people actually don't travel for work, and another large part of the workforce has a company car/van/truck. EVs have pretty respectable ranges today and will work for literally 90% of people.

(Original post by Jackieox)
"Close to home" yeah but i'd feel a bit uncomfortable leaving my car charging overnight at a random charging point a mile away.
Charging stations are usually in highly frequented, open, well-lit locations that are quite likely safer than the street you live on.

(Original post by Jackieox)
Take my uni for example, there isn't an electric charge point at the uni or in the town centre itself. So if i got an electric car you're saying I should leave it at the petrol station (which is the nearest charge point) and walk the four miles back to my house?
Your example is pretty irrelevant. Stop making this about yourself. The OP asked about the basic viability of an EV as a first car. You made a very stupid comment, I made fun of you and corrected you. Shan't we leave it at that?

EVs are not for everyone. I don't think they're perfect. As you might have gathered from my signature, I work in the auto industry. The OEM I work for currently doesn't make a single EV. I drive a 400hp petrol car, and I really enjoy that. That doesn't change the fact that EVs are the future, and that they are a very viable option for many people today.
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