is it worth spending £500-600 on a 2014/2015 spec macbook pro/air for xcode?

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quasa
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#1
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So the devices in question are grade A (ie more or less still in box) for the air and b (ie good quality used) for the pro.

Both have i5 dual core processors and 8gb ram but both arent retina devices afaik. Would this still be decent for using for xcode as it isnt really much of a difference in price vs a mac mini and imo is more practical than the mini with much better internals.

I know people will probably say build a hackingtosh or use a vm but vm sierra is a pain to use
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Async
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do you have prior experience to xcode? because you might buy a mac to then later realise you hate iOS development, like me.
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quasa
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no experience with xcode tbh but am considering learning it as it is an important to develop for apple devices. from what I gather the syntax for swift is similar to python which I have experience with and prefer python and c# to java in terms of languages
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RoyalSheepy
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(Original post by quasa)
So the devices in question are grade A (ie more or less still in box) for the air and b (ie good quality used) for the pro.

Both have i5 dual core processors and 8gb ram but both arent retina devices afaik. Would this still be decent for using for xcode as it isnt really much of a difference in price vs a mac mini and imo is more practical than the mini with much better internals.

I know people will probably say build a hackingtosh or use a vm but vm sierra is a pain to use
To be fair, MacBook Air's are a solid piece of kit! Personally I'd recommend them for school work or if you just need a new laptop.

However, in your instance, it depends on how much you really want to code... £500-600 is a lot of money to be splashing around. If you've already got a good enough PC then why not just dual boot your system with MacOS and Windows (Hackingtosh), that way you get the best out of both worlds, without having to pay a score.
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quasa
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(Original post by RoyalSheepy)
To be fair, MacBook Air's are a solid piece of kit! Personally I'd recommend them for school work or if you just need a new laptop.

However, in your instance, it depends on how much you really want to code... £500-600 is a lot of money to be splashing around. If you've already got a good enough PC then why not just dual boot your system with MacOS and Windows (Hackingtosh), that way you get the best out of both worlds, without having to pay a score.
my laptops are not exactly great atm and personally wanted to get the surface book coming out later this year (detachable screen and pen support a must for me and if the performance base is anything to go by the battery life will be insane) however that would mean waiting till between November and April which I cant really do.

my desktop on the other hand is a glitchy piece of bleep which the OEM refuses to replace despite being under warranty and being crap since day 1.

I just need an macOS device for visual studio integration (essentially if you have xcode then you can integrate apple development on a terminal using VS2017) but having a mac device means you can install android studio, xcode and vs2017 all on 1 device, which is ok in the short run
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RoyalSheepy
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(Original post by quasa)
my laptops are not exactly great atm and personally wanted to get the surface book coming out later this year (detachable screen and pen support a must for me and if the performance base is anything to go by the battery life will be insane) however that would mean waiting till between November and April which I cant really do.

my desktop on the other hand is a glitchy piece of bleep which the OEM refuses to replace despite being under warranty and being crap since day 1.

I just need an macOS device for visual studio integration (essentially if you have xcode then you can integrate apple development on a terminal using VS2017) but having a mac device means you can install android studio, xcode and vs2017 all on 1 device, which is ok in the short run
I'd say go for a MacBook then, if you're ready to pay that price, it's probably worth it if your existing computer is playing up. Plus you're going to have the excellent portability and battery life of the MacBook Air which means you can take your laptop out and about with you and code .

That sounds like you're into some serious coding :lol: What type of apps are you making?
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Digisirran
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If it's for iOS mainly then can't VS2017 build to iOS on PC?
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quasa
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(Original post by Digisirran)
If it's for iOS mainly then can't VS2017 build to iOS on PC?
Whilst you can code and emulate iOS natively/via xamarin or cordova on vs2017 (as well as code for macOS and watchOS), you need an xcode account and to be rooted to a mac device to do so. If you have a mac device on you or get a cloud mac (essentially Microsoft have a facility made of macs which you can use via the internet but you have to pay a fee), you can code apple using windows or linux.

sadly jobs when he came back to apple in the early 00s made it a policy to only run apple software on apple devices as it helped stengthen the brand
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Digisirran
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(Original post by quasa)
Whilst you can code and emulate iOS natively/via xamarin or cordova on vs2017 (as well as code for macOS and watchOS), you need an xcode account and to be rooted to a mac device to do so. If you have a mac device on you or get a cloud mac (essentially Microsoft have a facility made of macs which you can use via the internet but you have to pay a fee), you can code apple using windows or linux.

sadly jobs when he came back to apple in the early 00s made it a policy to only run apple software on apple devices as it helped stengthen the brand
Oh, well that sucks. Your best bet is probably a used MBP 15in or a used rMBP 13in, considering you need a laptop and something for native iOS/Apple. Or even an Air 13in. I currently have an rMBP 13 and just reinstalled macOS Sierra and bootcamped Windows 10 Education 64bit. What's bugger about it is the non-user replaceable RAM. Why would Apple do this???
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quasa
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Digisirran)
Oh, well that sucks. Your best bet is probably a used MBP 15in or a used rMBP 13in, considering you need a laptop and something for native iOS/Apple. Or even an Air 13in. I currently have an rMBP 13 and just reinstalled macOS Sierra and bootcamped Windows 10 Education 64bit. What's bugger about it is the non-user replaceable RAM. Why would Apple do this???
tis a mystery but apple have always had a non-mod policy regarding their devices (terms and conditions state so even though you own the device). the mac mini pre-2014 was easily moddable from what I gather but post 2014 not so much (like I said in my original post I was considering a mac mini but imo it would be pointless as I currently only have 1 monitor which my playstations and desktop are plugged on and it would be lying around the house. at least with a mac mini ill have a usable portable device till microsoft unveils their new surface range (speaking of which


Spoiler:
Show


DAMN YOU INTEL FOR TRYING TO BLOCK x86 ON ARM - essentially CShell, which is microsofts new core system is a friggin paradigm shift, has been leaked and to the media earlier this week but intel are now threatening to sue ARM for not having their permission to use x86, meaning that tonnes of laptops, tablets and potentital phones which are due to be unveiled later this year (~october november but probably wont be on sale in the uk till april may 2018) may be cancelled.

i know intel are trying to protect their IP but if they didnt mess up their mobile processors a few years ago, windows 10 mobile wouldnt have been a friggin half baked OS which made microsoft turn to ARM to develop a proper OS for use across all devices

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