How do people run out of time in exams? Watch

username2911200
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The exam board doesn't just pluck a number out of thin air and run with it. Obviously the amount of time given is proportional to how much time the paper should take, which has been fairly and logically analysed (with extra time given to those legitimately judged to need it, which is not very many at all as a percentage of your year group). If you run out of time then it's down to your poor exam technique, which guess what, you've had two academic years to practise and perfect.

Your teachers have been banging on at you for two years about how much time to spend on each section, how much you should aim to write for each section, how to be concise when you need to, how to write in detail when you need to, etc. They sit there with you time and time again with timed and untimed papers in lessons and revision sessions, going through mistakes you could make and how to correct them. They show you the specification, past mark schemes and sample answers. They tell you to revise the content and practise your exam technique against all of this. Then you still run out of time because clearly, you haven't been paying any attention at all to the people who were trying to help you.
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HopelessMedic
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(Original post by Glassapple)
The exam board doesn't just pluck a number out of thin air and run with it. Obviously the amount of time given is proportional to how much time the paper should take, which has been fairly and logically analysed (with extra time given to those legitimately judged to need it, which is not very many at all as a percentage of your year group). If you run out of time then it's down to your poor exam technique, which guess what, you've had two academic years to practise and perfect.

Your teachers have been banging on at you for two years about how much time to spend on each section, how much you should aim to write for each section, how to be concise when you need to, how to write in detail you need to, etc. They sit there with you time and time again with timed and untimed papers in lessons and revision sessions, going through mistakes you could make and how to correct them. They show you the specification, past mark schemes and sample answers. They tell you to revise the content and practise your exam technique against all of this. Then you still run out of time because clearly, you haven't been paying any attention at all to the people who were trying to help you.
Calm down, it's more difficult in an exam situation where the grade you get actually counts to simply move on from a question and throwaway marks.
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Cloverleaf25
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(Original post by Glassapple)
The exam board doesn't just pluck a number out of thin air and run with it. Obviously the amount of time given is proportional to how much time the paper should take, which has been fairly and logically analysed (with extra time given to those legitimately judged to need it, which is not very many at all as a percentage of your year group). If you run out of time then it's down to your poor exam technique, which guess what, you've had two academic years to practise and perfect.

Your teachers have been banging on at you for two years about how much time to spend on each section, how much you should aim to write for each section, how to be concise when you need to, how to write in detail when you need to, etc. They sit there with you time and time again with timed and untimed papers in lessons and revision sessions, going through mistakes you could make and how to correct them. They show you the specification, past mark schemes and sample answers. They tell you to revise the content and practise your exam technique against all of this. Then you still run out of time because clearly, you haven't been paying any attention at all to the people who were trying to help you.
Are you actually kidding me 😂 People don't have a "poor exam technique" for running out of time, maybe focus on your own exams?
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Dysf(x)al
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(Original post by Glassapple)
The exam board doesn't just pluck a number out of thin air and run with it. Obviously the amount of time given is proportional to how much time the paper should take, which has been fairly and logically analysed (with extra time given to those legitimately judged to need it, which is not very many at all as a percentage of your year group). If you run out of time then it's down to your poor exam technique, which guess what, you've had two academic years to practise and perfect.

Your teachers have been banging on at you for two years about how much time to spend on each section, how much you should aim to write for each section, how to be concise when you need to, how to write in detail when you need to, etc. They sit there with you time and time again with timed and untimed papers in lessons and revision sessions, going through mistakes you could make and how to correct them. They show you the specification, past mark schemes and sample answers. They tell you to revise the content and practise your exam technique against all of this. Then you still run out of time because clearly, you haven't been paying any attention at all to the people who were trying to help you.
Not everyone can think and write as quickly. It's easy to know how long you should spend, but if you're a slow writer or get stuck on a question, you can run out of time. While the idea of time budgeting seems perfectly logical to you, some people struggle. That's why time limits exist - time manageament is an important skill.
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username2911200
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(Original post by Cloverleaf25)
Are you actually kidding me 😂 People don't have a "poor exam technique" for running out of time, maybe focus on your own exams?
So you're telling me the exam boards just pick a time out of a hat and just print it on the papers? Obviously they've trialled the units internally and decided on a logical and fair needed amount of time, which is reflected in the specifications and the teaching. If you're not able to answer the questions in the allotted period of time then that's poor exam technique and you haven't taken in the specification properly, nor have you revised effectively. My exams are going extremely well, thank you for your concern.

(Original post by TheMindGarage)
That's why time limits exist - time manageament is an important skill.
You don't think two years of GCSE teaching and a further two years of A-level teaching is adequate preparation for being able to manage your time in exams?

(Original post by Mahnoor95)
i bet you're fun at parties
You should see me with the hot boys.
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pereira325
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In most cases yes I agree. I usually don't struggle on time for exams, but I am not your average exam candidate. I write faster than most which is good for me as I get more done in less time.
I have to say though, some maths modules deserve greater time.
Mechanics- M1, M2 requires you to draw diagrams too.
I am able to do the questions and get them right, but even so, time is a bit of an issue. This module requires more time than C3 for instance as it's more demanding but both modules get the same time. Is that fair? (I record how long it takes me to do past papers and on average I do C3 like 10mins+ faster than M2)
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thatguy170296
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When it comes to exams, that goes out the window. You might start writing something, work on it for a while, then decide it's not good enough and re-write.

You might be much more comfortable with one section, so decide to write much more for it to compensate for lost marks on other questions (so spend time frantically filling in the last sections).

Or maybe, you are really strong in the exam, and write loads for every single question?

Passion for what you're writing also?

Lots of reasons........
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Dysf(x)al
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(Original post by Glassapple)
You don't think two years of GCSE teaching and a further two years of A-level teaching is adequate preparation for being able to manage your time in exams?
Of course it's adequate. But some people just don't get it. In my school there are people without genuine learning difficulties who don't know what 7 times 4 is. Twelve years of teaching just hasn't worked for them.

I think it's only right to penalise these time-strugglers. Nobody will hire someone who can't stick to deadlines and work at a reasonable pace, no matter how good their content is.
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haseebj49
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I seriously think that for AQA business studies we do not get enough time...
We have 60 mins for 60 marks, (Structure is 3x 3 marks/2 marks, 8 marks and 9 marks)
BUT we have two read 3 case studies and analyse the data withing that time frame.
Usually the grade boundaries are really low for the subject though as many people can't finish the exam in time. (Last year an A* was 36/60)
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username2911200
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(Original post by thatguy170296)
When it comes to exams, that goes out the window. You might start writing something, work on it for a while, then decide it's not good enough and re-write.

You might be much more comfortable with one section, so decide to write much more for it to compensate for lost marks on other questions (so spend time frantically filling in the last sections).

Or maybe, you are really strong in the exam, and write loads for every single question?

Passion for what you're writing also?

Lots of reasons........
Passion should mean nothing. You're there to pass the exam, you've been learning how to pass the exam for two years. You can be passionate about it in your own time, the school rightly teaches you how to pass, not how to express yourself however you want and waste all your time. If you're clever enough to be strong in the exam you should be clever enough to manage your time properly.

(Original post by TheMindGarage)
Of course it's adequate. But some people just don't get it. In my school there are people without genuine learning difficulties who don't know what 7 times 4 is. Twelve years of teaching just hasn't worked for them. I think it's only right to penalise these time-strugglers. Nobody will hire someone who can't stick to deadlines and work at a reasonable pace, no matter how good their content is.
Exactly, people have spent years learning how to write concisely and how to perform under pressure, yet they haven't listened. Nobody is going to hire someone who can't get a job done on time, regardless of how good bits they managed to do are.

(Original post by daas13)
ROFL my cousin is in his third year of med school and he only finished 4/12 of his final alevel exams, achieving A*AAA so shut up
If he'd had better exam technique he would have got 4 A*s. It's always very convenient when something has happened to someone you know, so you can pull it out whenever needed.
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daas13
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(Original post by Glassapple)
Passion should mean nothing. You're there to pass the exam, you've been learning how to pass the exam for two years. You can be passionate about it in your own time, the school rightly teaches you how to pass, not how to express yourself however you want and waste all your time.



If he'd had better exam technique he would have got 4 A*s. It's always very convinient when something has happened to someone you know, so you can pull it out whenever needed.
Im pretty sure you wont achieve 4As, Pls.

My own GCSES; I achieved 10A*s and 3As and out of the 28 ish exams i had, i probably completed half. Point being, out of the 13 A*/A grades I got, all subjects would atleast have one exam paper i didnt complete.

Don't go on to quote me without responding to this: What grades/qualifications have you got?
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faloodeh
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I love your posts
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username2911200
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(Original post by daas13)
Im pretty sure you wont achieve 4As, Pls.

My own GCSES; I achieved 10A*s and 3As and out of the 28 ish exams i had, i probably completed half. Point being, out of the 13 A*/A grades I got, all subjects would atleast have one exam paper i didnt complete.

Don't go on to quote me without responding to this: What grades/qualifications have you got?
I have 14 A*s at GCSE (which I mentioned on here over 6 months ago so I'm not just making that up now) and I'm doing my AS-levels at the moment. I didn't get below 100% in any exam I took.

(Original post by Faloodeh)
I love your posts
Maybe I should have a fan club.
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black1blade
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(Original post by pereira325)
In most cases yes I agree. I usually don't struggle on time for exams, but I am not your average exam candidate. I write faster than most which is good for me as I get more done in less time.
I have to say though, some maths modules deserve greater time.
Mechanics- M1, M2 requires you to draw diagrams too.
I am able to do the questions and get them right, but even so, time is a bit of an issue. This module requires more time than C3 for instance as it's more demanding but both modules get the same time. Is that fair? (I record how long it takes me to do past papers and on average I do C3 like 10mins+ faster than M2)
The thing is that the actual maths in m1 takes barely any time. Exam next week and I'll probably spend the most time on a slope one as question 6 or 7 trying to work out where forces are going and stuff. The direction of friction especially is something that always ****s me up XD.
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username2552331
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Some people clearly are less efficient, write slower, think slower, and get stuck on questions. Yes, they have poor exam technique. Why ask this question if you already know the answer?
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Gerry-Atricks
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(Original post by Glassapple)
I have 14 A*s at GCSE (which I mentioned on here over 6 months ago so I'm not just making that up now) and I'm doing my AS-levels at the moment. I didn't get below 100% in any exam I took.



Maybe I should have a fan club.
Im pretty sure that no one believes this.

You may have to post a picture of your gcse result sheet (with your details blurred) if you want people to, fairly outlandish claim
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Gerry-Atricks
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(Original post by Glassapple)
Obviously I meant in all the exams I have results for so far. Could you really not work that out? I'm such a liar because I have better grades than you?



I'll post it with my AS results sheet when I get it.
Fair, do you mean 100 UMS or 100 raw because i think it is nigh impossible to not drop a single mark in a gcse science exam.
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Gerry-Atricks
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(Original post by daas13)
glad! Lol i always see you around TSR setting folk straight
Its just that its a highly unbelievable claim and he should understand if someone wants proof.
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champion13
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Some people just can't do specific things - I can't do maths without taking twice as long to check I've got answers etc and I run out of time really quickly. I wish I could be better but it's hard. This post is quite closed minded..
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username2911200
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(Original post by glad-he-ate-her)
Fair, do you mean 100 UMS or 100 raw because i think it is nigh impossible to not drop a single mark in a gcse science exam.
UMS, we weren't given the raw marks specifically, although I asked for some of my papers back and I got all the raw marks on those.
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