What if there was a 100% turnout? Watch

username2400835
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
this year there was a high turnout of around 68%, but that still leaves 32% of eligible people who didn't vote, let alone people that can register but haven't.

What do you think the results would be if everyone who can registered to vote, and we had a 100%? It's really surprising and frustrating to see that there are even times where we have a 60-something % turnout and then people complain about the result.

so if everyone who could vote voted, who do you think would win?
0
reply
Ladbants
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
Probably labour but I'm glad those people don't vote lol, they'd turn us into Venezuela
1
reply
ThomH97
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
I think you should be registered automatically and have to vote (you can still spoil your ballot, but you do have to actually turn up), like jury duty.
0
reply
Reality Check
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by ThomH97)
I think you should be registered automatically and have to vote (you can still spoil your ballot, but you do have to actually turn up), like jury duty.
I don't. I think one of the freedoms of a system that allows you to vote is being able to not vote if you so choose.
0
reply
ThomH97
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Reality Check)
I don't. I think one of the freedoms of a system that allows you to vote is being able to not vote if you so choose.
Yeah, so you spoil your ballot.
0
reply
Reality Check
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by ThomH97)
Yeah, so you spoil your ballot.
You're missing the point. It's the concept of having it mandated that's the problem for me - we should have the freedom to just choose not to vote if we so wish.
0
reply
ThomH97
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by Reality Check)
You're missing the point. It's the concept of having it mandated that's the problem for me - we should have the freedom to just choose not to vote if we so wish.
How do you feel about jury duty?

I don't think we should be forced to choose to endorse the least worst option if we feel they're all bad, but we also shouldn't be allowed to be lazy regarding this.
0
reply
Punder Girl
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
Given lower turnouts tend to be among groups more likely to vote Labour, I'd imagine Labour.

(Original post by Reality Check)
You're missing the point. It's the concept of having it mandated that's the problem for me - we should have the freedom to just choose not to vote if we so wish.
Yes, what a human rights atrocity to have to be forced to spare ten minutes to go to your local polling station and put a cross on a piece of paper. If everyone who fought for the vote could have imagined such a horror, they would have never fought for us to have this right.

You're not insisting people have to vote for a party they don't believe in, they could vote "None of the above." You're just making it so the lazy and the bizarre ("Nothing ever changes," someone says as a reason they won't vote for change) actually turn up instead of whining and expecting sympathy afterward despite making no effort to change the outcome.
1
reply
Reality Check
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by Punder Girl)
Given lower turnouts tend to be among groups more likely to vote Labour, I'd imagine Labour.



Yes, what a human rights atrocity to have to be forced to spare ten minutes to go to your local polling station and put a cross on a piece of paper. If everyone who fought for the vote could have imagined such a horror, they would have never fought for us to have this right.
They fought for the right for you to have the ability to vote, not the obligation to.
1
reply
Punder Girl
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by Reality Check)
They fought for the right for you to have the ability to vote, not the obligation to.
If we didn't have the right to vote, the same people who don't turn up to vote would be saying they should have a right to vote. It's not some moral stance on their part.

It's so entitled to complain about your right to vote in a democratic election. As I said, if it was forcing people to vote for a party they did not wish to, I would completely agree, but it's literally just making it mandatory people at least express their opinion.
0
reply
TorpidPhil
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by Punder Girl)
If we didn't have the right to vote, the same people who don't turn up to vote would be saying they should have a right to vote. It's not some moral stance on their part.

It's so entitled to complain about your right to vote in a democratic election. As I said, if it was forcing people to vote for a party they did not wish to, I would completely agree, but it's literally just making it mandatory people at least express their opinion.
Yes, on the italics. And why do you feel that is so necessary?

Do you not understand that some people really do not give a crap about politics and therefore it is actually better for the political system to ignore them?

This doesn't even take into consideration the fact that no individual vote ever makes a difference and therefore from an individual perspective it is irrational to ever vote if voting itself doesn't give you a strange surge of belonging.
0
reply
Punder Girl
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by TorpidPhil)
Yes, on the italics. And why do you feel that is so necessary?

Do you not understand that some people really do not give a crap about politics and therefore it is actually better for the political system to ignore them?

This doesn't even take into consideration the fact that no individual vote ever makes a difference and therefore from an individual perspective it is irrational to ever vote if voting itself doesn't give you a strange surge of belonging.
An individual vote doesn't make a difference in the sense of say, an individual Green voter in a Labour safe seat, no. But that's not what we're talking about here.

We're talking about thirty percent of people unaccounted for. And if you want to try and tell me that won't make a difference, tell that to the MPs that won their constituencies by less than a hundred votes.

On the people "not giving a crap about politics," if you have a thought on politics, you give a crap about it. If you complain that the government you didn't like got in and now it's going to affect you in such and such a way, that's giving a crap about politics. If you mean not giving a crap about politics in terms of not being particularly politically active, well: there are a lot of people who vote who aren't particularly politically active.

And I feel it's necessary because if it were legally required that people vote, I don't think everyone who doesn't turn out would just vote "None of the above." I mean, increased voter turnouts prove that not to be true, no?

If it were legally required, people who wouldn't usually vote would actually put some thought to it, rather than what we have now, where a lot of people just dismiss it because they "can't be bothered" or give reasons that don't really make much sense when you evaluate it.
0
reply
TorpidPhil
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#13
Report 2 years ago
#13
(Original post by Punder Girl)
An individual vote doesn't make a difference in the sense of say, an individual Green voter in a Labour safe seat, no. But that's not what we're talking about here.

We're talking about thirty percent of people unaccounted for. And if you want to try and tell me that won't make a difference, tell that to the MPs that won their constituencies by less than a hundred votes.

On the people "not giving a crap about politics," if you have a thought on politics, you give a crap about it. If you complain that the government you didn't like got in and now it's going to affect you in such and such a way, that's giving a crap about politics. If you mean not giving a crap about politics in terms of not being particularly politically active, well: there are a lot of people who vote who aren't particularly politically active.

And I feel it's necessary because if it were legally required that people vote, I don't think everyone who doesn't turn out would just vote "None of the above." I mean, increased voter turnouts prove that not to be true, no?

If it were legally required, people who wouldn't usually vote would actually put some thought to it, rather than what we have now, where a lot of people just dismiss it because they "can't be bothered" or give reasons that don't really make much sense when you evaluate it.
An individual vote doesn't count period. When was the last time an electoral result was won on the basis of a majority of 1 vote? How likely is that to change in the future? If one was to change one's actions on the basis of such trivial probabilities one would very much struggle to live! No individual vote makes any difference at all. Nobody will notice if suddenly you as a sole individual cease to vote. If you persuade others to do likewise... that is different.

If you want to make an electoral difference you have to invest time and money into persuading others as to how to use their vote. Spending a few weeks campaigning and getting an extra 20 votes for your party is waaaay more valuable than choosing to vote for them yourself. You could do the former and never vote yourself and you are still a huge asset to the party.

"On the people "not giving a crap about politics," if you have a thought on politics, you give a crap about it. If you complain that the government you didn't like got in and now it's going to affect you in such and such a way, that's giving a crap about politics. If you mean not giving a crap about politics in terms of not being particularly politically active, well: there are a lot of people who vote who aren't particularly politically active.

And I feel it's necessary because if it were legally required that people vote, I don't think everyone who doesn't turn out would just vote "None of the above." I mean, increased voter turnouts prove that not to be true, no?"

On the first paragraph above, yeah, if they are complaining and did nothing fair enough. Voting alone isn't going to make a difference though so you don't get out of it all and are allowed to complain ust because you voted xD As I said before, one vote doesn't matter. Unless you debated these things regularly, and changed a few minds and thus changed a few votes... You didn't seriously try to affect the outcome so have no mandate. Voting statistically doesn't matter. Therefore even if you do care (such as myself) there's no reason to vote. It makes literally 0 difference whether I vote or not. Nobody notices.

On the second paragraph you're working on a weird principle of assuming that people having their say on the matter is a good thing. Why? If people are ill-informed about something, generally ignorant and highly apathetic why do you think it is a good thing to force them to act on the matter and influence it? I agree that in an ideal world everyone would be very politically aware and we'd have a super intellectual politic public. But the reality is we don't and forcing such people to turn up to vote will not benefit anyone since on average they will have -bad- political understanding. Thus we end up with a country that is worse off...

When turnout starts to get to 50% we have an issue. However the solution -so- isn't forcing people to vote. that just hides the issue - if there is political disinterest then reform must be done to our political system to make it more engaging to the public and I think one thing that does need to happen is some reform to campaigning and transparency. It's too complicated is political debate for the public to seriously get into it unless they have a lot of free time (like me as a student) or are wealthy. All the media bullhit, spin and fake news needs to somehow be addressed too.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What's your favourite genre?

Rock (143)
24.49%
Pop (142)
24.32%
Jazz (26)
4.45%
Classical (32)
5.48%
Hip-Hop (103)
17.64%
Electronic (42)
7.19%
Indie (96)
16.44%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed