Farmerjj
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Name:  image.jpg
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I'm stuck on part b of this question and don't really know where to start. Also for part c would I be right in saying you would just set it up and see which electrode got larger?
Thanks
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monkeyman0121
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For part b i can't 100% answer. I would say look at the last column of the table. Like B is more positive than A for example. This is probably what you need to use to do reactivities. I just can't remember how you can order the reactivity using how positive the letters are.
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univ4464
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(Original post by Farmerjj)
Hi,
I'm stuck on part b of this question and don't really know where to start. Also for part c would I be right in saying you would just set it up and see which electrode got larger?
Thanks
Apparently more reactive metals have a more negative standard electrode potential. So you need to look at which element is at the positive terminal and that one must therefore be the less reactive of the two. So B is less reactive than A from the first one.
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Farmerjj
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(Original post by alfredholmes)
Apparently more reactive metals have a more negative standard electrode potential. So you need to look at which element is at the positive terminal and that one must therefore be the less reactive of the two. So B is less reactive than A from the first one.
Do you know why that is, or do we not need to know that?
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univ4464
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(Original post by Farmerjj)
Do you know why that is, or do we not need to know that?
Not really I get a bit confused with the whole thing because lots of stuff seems to be glossed over on this topic. I think is is because the thing at the most negative electrode gets oxidised, so the metal goes from being a metal into one of its ions, while the other one goes from an ion to a metal, so if it were a gcse style displacement reaction you'd say that the more negative one displaces the more positive one because it is more reactive.
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james0902
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Isn't it just A D B C?
If B is more positive than A
and C is more positive than B
and B is more positive than D

If you think about it logically, C is the most positive, B is the second most positive, then D, and finally A.
The reactivity series is derived from electrochemical cell potentials, where the most negative is the most reactive.
Therefore, it would be A D B C
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