Difference between convalent and ionic bonding? Watch

tfh
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Kind of confused about the difference between the two.

Please help.
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3317752
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(Original post by tfh)
Kind of confused about the difference between the two.

Please help.
hi there!

Covalent bonds are normally to do with sharing electrons, where ionic bonds are to do with either giving away or gaining electrons.

Certain examples of ionic bonds include molecules such as Calcium Carbonate and they occur mainly within a metal and a non metal. Covalent bonds mainly occur non-metals and they are responsible for the bonds in diatomic particles such as Fluorine, Oxygen and etc.

Ionic bonds also have to do with the charges. For example, if an atom gives away an electron in the process of ionic bonds, it loses a negative charge, hence becomes positively charged. This means that the corresponding atom which gains the electron gains an negative charge, meaning it is negatively charged.

The opposite charges in the two atoms act as the force to keep them together, hence bonded.
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tfh
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(Original post by Pretish)
hi there!

Covalent bonds are normally to do with sharing electrons, where ionic bonds are to do with either giving away or gaining electrons.

Certain examples of ionic bonds include molecules such as Calcium Carbonate and they occur mainly within a metal and a non metal. Covalent bonds mainly occur non-metals and they are responsible for the bonds in diatomic particles such as Fluorine, Oxygen and etc.

Ionic bonds also have to do with the charges. For example, if an atom gives away an electron in the process of ionic bonds, it loses a negative charge, hence becomes positively charged. This means that the corresponding atom which gains the electron gains an negative charge, meaning it is negatively charged.

The opposite charges in the two atoms act as the force to keep them together, hence bonded.
That was an amazing explanation, thank you!
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Kronixion
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(Original post by tfh)
Kind of confused about the difference between the two.

Please help.
Covalent:
Non metal to non metal
A pair of electrons are shared equally between the atoms involved in the bond
Generally form full outer shells
Tend to be weaker bonds but can have giant covalent structures such as graphite and diamond, which are incredibly strong.

Ionic:
Metal to non metal
Instead of sharing electrons, electron(s) are more attracted to one atom compared to the other atom in the bond (positive charge of protons in nucleus).
This causes electron transfer between the two atoms forming a positive and negative ion. Ions are held together by strong electrostatic attraction between positive and negative ions. Held together in a 3D lattice structure.
Ionic bonds are very strong and ionic compounds tend to have a high boiling and melting points.

Hope this helps! Also are you doing Edexcel iGCSE Chemistry?
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3317752
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(Original post by tfh)
That was an amazing explanation, thank you!
No worries! Good luck for your exam tomorrow (assuming you do AQA)
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Katie213
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Hi!

Covalent Bonding:
When two atoms share a pair of electrons
Called Molecules

Simple Molecules - Made up of molecules that have strong covalent bonds holding the together but have weak intermolecular forces holding molecules together and so have low melting points and boiling points. They have no overall charge, so they cannot carry electrical charge so do not conduct electricity.

e.g Hydrogen + Hydrogen

Ionic Bonding:
When metals react with non metals
The electrons are transferred from the metal to the non-metal.
Both Form an ion.
Many strong bonds throughout a lattice which need lots of energy to break so they have high melting and boiling points.
Can conduct electricity when melted or dissolved because the ions are free to move.
Hard and strong substances due to the many strong bonds.
Soluble because water molecules are able to separate the ions from the ionic lattice so the substance 'breaks apart'.

e.g Na + Cl


Really hopes this helps although it might be a little confusing - I was trying to get everything from y brain and revision notes down! Not sure if you necessarily need know simple molecules but if you are doing the AQA IGCSE (like me) you do!!

Message me if you need any other help on any topic I will be more than happy to help!

Good luck tomorrow, just think that it is one more down!!
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tfh
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(Original post by Kronixion)
Covalent:
Non metal to non metal
A pair of electrons are shared equally between the atoms involved in the bond
Generally form full outer shells
Tend to be weaker bonds but can have giant covalent structures such as graphite and diamond, which are incredibly strong.

Ionic:
Metal to non metal
Instead of sharing electrons, electron(s) are more attracted to one atom compared to the other atom in the bond (positive charge of protons in nucleus).
This causes electron transfer between the two atoms forming a positive and negative ion. Ions are held together by strong electrostatic attraction between positive and negative ions. Held together in a 3D lattice structure.
Ionic bonds are very strong and ionic compounds tend to have a high boiling and melting points.

Hope this helps! Also are you doing Edexcel iGCSE Chemistry?
Thanks for the explanation! And no I'm doing OCR 21st century GCSE Chemistry.
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