Army Air Corps Watch

Lady Venom
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#1
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#1
Anyone thinking of joining? Got any gen?
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artdes
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#2
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#2
If RAF is a negative...AAC is plan B. RN plan C.
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StormShadow
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#3
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#3
Looked into it but not in much depth. Commissioning Course takes 44 weeks, I think, then you have to complete an attachment to a infantry unit then after that a 14 month(?) pilot course(rotary and fixed wing).
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BlackHawk
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#4
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I assume you know how army selection and training works, and that you must gain sponsorship into the AAC as you're clued up on most forces gen.

Are you sure it's the route you want to go down? There's no guarantee you'll get AAC after Sandhurst, and those who do get a slot have high aptitude despite the 80 requirement because of how competitive it is.
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threeportdrift
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#5
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If RAF is a negative...AAC is plan B. RN plan C.
I would be very, very cautious about this line of thinking. I'm not saying that it is certainly wrong, but it is certainly not right for most people.

The RAF is an organisation whose raison d'etre is to operate aircraft, everything is designed around that function (putting cynicism aside for the moment!). By becoming aircrew in the RAF you are effectively operating at the top of the organisational pyramid.

In both the Army and the RN, aviation is a non-core part of the organisations business. That's not to say that it isn't important to the overall scheme, but it is far from central, with all the organisational pressures that could bring. The culture that you live, operate and survive politically in is very different as a non-core entity than in the core.

Following on from this is the difference and diversity of jobs you can do, whilst RAF aircrew don't tend to shuffle round a lot between aircraft types, they can. Then there are a range of staff jobs in the RAF, not appealing at this stage in your career, but maybe more so if you want promotion or a family life at any point in the future. How diverse and sustainable is your flying career in the AAC?

And RAF aircraft fly a full spectrum of duties (eg Hercs = route, aeromed, air drop, para, specialist etc). I guess rotary off a ship could produce a diverse list - based on being rotary - off a ship though!

Then there is the type of flying. Why do you want to fly? Because the type of flying most people are exposed to in either mil or civ basic training is very very different to operating in a battlefield helicopter. I think you have to be very certain about exactly what it is that gives you a buzz in flying, and that it will be satisfied in the AAC or RN.

In no way do I mean to suggest that flying in the AAC or RN is 'not as good' as flying in the RAF, just that it is very different. For a number of reasons the idea that RAF>AAC>RN is a logical progression is really not wise and needs to be explored very carefully.
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Lady Venom
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#6
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#6
It's not plan B, AAC is plan C.....

The RAF aren't going to take me as a pilot end of story. RN pilot is plan B.

I know how the AAC works and differs and that there is no garuntee slot. But it's an option and to me, a better option than the airlines.

I just don't know much about what the AAC do flying wise - I know apache act as chinook escorts and that's about it! My Dad was far from happy when I mentioned the AAC!!!

Thanks for the advice guys, keep it coming!
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Theo1977
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#7
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#7
How would you feel if you don't get AAC after Sandhurst? What would you do? How would you react?
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Lady Venom
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#8
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#8
I'd probably PVR... it's a pilot I want to be. I just can't do the computerised stuff at Cranners. Well I if I sat the whole lot I would pass. I just wasted two chances age 17/18 when you aren't at your peak. I was close and my maths was shocking, so I reckon I'd pass well now. But I don't have that chance as I was a naive and cocky 18 year old determined to get in and blew my chances. I should have just research UAS's before I went back to Cranwell and waited.
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ginger_monkey
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#9
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AAC ain't a bad choice, I know a few guys who fly apaches and love it and also someone who is going through the selection process just now. If you want I can pass on e-mail addresses and you can have a wee chat- they love talking about it! The guy in charge of Officer recruiting is also a very sound man and will be happy to discuss any queries with you, I have e-mail for him too (oh, apparently he may have a bit of a soft spot for the luverly ladies!).
There are 2 routes to flying in the AAC- commissioned and NCO and 2 choices of craft to fly- Lynx and Apache. I think everyone starts on Lynx. For NCO you just pop along to AFCO and apply, sit the BARB test and go from there: 12wks phase 1 at Pirbright then phase 2 at Middle Wallop- the School of Army Aviation. You can't start flying training until you reach Lance Corporal (about 4 years) and pass aptitude testing and flying grading. There may, however, be exceptions if you have previous flying experience.

Officer route: As you know you have to apply for a commission and place at Sandhurst. The recruiting Officer will put you in touch with AAC. The AAC like you to have sat the aptitude tests at Cramwell and to go on a familiarisation visit where they can offer you 'sponosorship'. Once you have passed AOSB you can do your flying grading before going to Sandhurst. Although you can not be guaranteed AAC if you have done all of this before going then you have a pretty high chance of getting an offer.

I hope this helps and just say if you need any more gen. The apache is a beast of a craft and it doesn't just act as chaperone to the Chinook!!
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ginger_monkey
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#10
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Oh, there's more! :p:
As an Officer in the AAC you will very quickly be commanding a flight of craft and groundcrew. As your career develops you can become an Instructor, Test Pilot, Adjutant (if you fancy desk job) or Squadron 2IC. There is aldo the opportunity to do commercial pilot licences or exchanges with the RAF/RN!!

Canyou tell I'm a big fan of the AAC
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Lady Venom
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#11
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#11
Cool cheers G_M. I have the bumpf but that's not enough, I want to know more before I start making decisions. I've done my primary app for the Army.
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artdes
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#12
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#12
Have any RAF applicants on here been to RN +/or AAC presentations? what were they like.
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Lady Venom
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#13
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#13
Nope! A lot of RAF rejects are flying for the RN though.
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artdes
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#14
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#14
LOL. Its just the whole carrier based idea that concerns me..+ side, you go to some wicked places.
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copeland
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#15
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#15
In a Spin,

I recently left the AAC to pursue career as an airline pilot- PM me if you want a better picture.

________________________________ _____________
tempus fugit
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Lady Venom
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#16
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#16
The carrier thing I actually think is wicked, such a challenged! I was initially put off by the living on a ship thing, but I've been on one now (albeit in port) and loved it! All my RN mates say its the best bit as well.
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artdes
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#17
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#17
The new JCA will be a class beast aswell. What is the average deployment onbourd carriers?
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Lady Venom
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#18
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#18
No idea... got to be 1000 at the very least?! I know on the American carriers it was more like 6k. And the Carrier's captain has to be a pilot
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artdes
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#19
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#19
If I go to Cranwell for RAF app and fail, does that count as one of my two chances of a RN app?
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PasserBy9
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#20
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#20
I may be wrong here but does the FAA/ACC not do their aptitude stuff at Cranwell anyway? I thought the chain of thinking was that Cranwell know what they are doing when selecting Aircrew so that other services send applicants there for a 'second opinion'.
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