Qer
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Explain why different observations are made when aqueous barium chloride is added
separately to aqueous magnesium sulfate and to aqueous magnesium nitrate.

ok so i know white precipitate is formed when barium chloride is added to magnesium sulfate as it is insoluble
BUT I DON'T KNOW WHAT HAPPENED WHEN IT IS ADDED IN MAGNESIUM NITRATE
so i guess that it is soluble
then

i checked mark scheme so it says it is soluble



but how would i know that?

(question from aqa as chem 2)
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monkeyman0121
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I am guessing you would have to remember this stuff, there is a lot of this kind of stuff you will have to remember. I think that the nitrate ion would react with the water, meaning it would dissolve? Don't quote me on this though.
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Qer
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i am revising whole content from 3 days but i don't found any of this stuff
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Mystery.
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Don't you get a solubility table?
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Qer
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(Original post by Mystery.)
Don't you get a solubility table?
nope
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Qer
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(Original post by Mystery.)
Don't you get a solubility table?
can you tell me from where i can get this
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Mystery.
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So it's a displacement reaction where the solvent is aqueous therefore I think you can use this table.
So for example for the second instance, the two products would be
Barium nitrate And magnesium chloride which are both very soluble so I'm guessing the result would also be soluble.

Another way to do it without the solubility table to consider equilibrium.
Compare barium nitrate with the equilibrium of water.

So as H+ + OH- ---> H2O
And Ba + NO3- ---> BaNO3

You can see Barium would react with the OH- which is a strong alkali and H with NO3- forming a strong acid (Nitric acid) which both dissociate fully therefore no precipitate is formed.
You can do the same with all the products to come to a conclusion.

But I think this is probably a memorising thing or maybe it's from a practical you need to know?
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