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    Hello everyone,

    I am going to study International Relations at LSE (undergraduate). Is anyone also taking taking this subject?
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    (Original post by guofangbu)
    Hello everyone,

    I am going to study International Relations at LSE (undergraduate). Is anyone also taking taking this subject?
    No, but i might take a module in it as my outside option. Are you staying in halls? I'm in Carr Saunders (doing History btw).
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    I'm studying International Relations! Staying in Roseberry.
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    I'm going to as well. Staying at bankside though
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    have any of you started to read the prelim list? if you have, which books?
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    I read a couple on holiday but I am struggling to remember what they are called!

    The very best one was something like "an introduction to International Relations" and i THINK it was by a guy called Nicholson. It very concisely covered the basic theories of the subject, I got the feeling that it is good just to give you a bit of a clue about things!

    I also read one from the list which had a name something like "Europe 1900-2000" and basically covered the major events in history in Europe. It wasn't very international relations based but definately helped clarify some things in my mind about the cold war etc. It was also quite well written and quite readable... unlike another book I tried to read that I had to put down because it was ultra-boring! It would probably be fine if you were writing an essay but just reading it off the fly was like nailing rusty nails through your ears.
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    i'm doing IR as well. btw- feedtheflamingo- were you at the open day? I think we might have chatted....
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    I went to an open day back in March 2003, I don't think we chatted - I don't think I chatted to anybody, everybody was foreign!
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    I got an offer from Rosebery Hall. I heard that it is quite a nice place to live.
    I am reading some materials on the subject of IR. Personally, I found some international political theories are, to some extent, hollow and devoid of content, for example, the Constructivist thought. And I think the study of IR focuses too much on politics. By the way, does anyone know how the English School of IR is regarded by IR scholars outside the UK, particularly by those in the US universities? Thanks for your reply and glad to meet you all.
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    guofangbu: an IR background from LSE is definitely a strong background even for US colleges. I'm hoping to study IR there as well, so I've been asking around. If you're interested in going to a US lawschool afterwards, they will definitely look on it favorably...

    For those of you that have already been accepted for IR at LSE, or are already attending: How hard is it to get in? Would writing to some of the professors help me get accepted maybe? How much do the admissions people rely on test grades, and how much on personal statements when making their decision? I've done some research with a federal judge here in the US, some other mentorship/internship/research work, and I took a course on Global ADR at the Central European University (Budapest) last summer. Is this something I should put in my personal statement? (hehe, sorry, I get a little carried away with questions...)
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    (Original post by aggie)
    If you're interested in going to a US lawschool afterwards, they will definitely look on it favorably...
    sorry, this is a bit off-topic, but are you suggesting that you can go to a US law school with IR background? I always thought it was necessary to do pre-law on an US college.....
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    You can apply to a US lawschool with any background. Basically, they just want to you to have good writing skills, and developed analytical thinking... There's a lot of people that do business, IR, political science, or whatever before applying to law school. I want to work in international law, so I plan on doing IR in undergrad, then going to lawschool.
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    (Original post by aggie)
    You can apply to a US lawschool with any background. Basically, they just want to you to have good writing skills, and developed analytical thinking... There's a lot of people that do business, IR, political science, or whatever before applying to law school. I want to work in international law, so I plan on doing IR in undergrad, then going to lawschool.
    and you just lightened up my day.

    thanks for the info
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    You're welcome

    btw, igor: are you a student at lse? what do you study?
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    (Original post by aggie)
    guofangbu: an IR background from LSE is definitely a strong background even for US colleges. I'm hoping to study IR there as well, so I've been asking around. If you're interested in going to a US lawschool afterwards, they will definitely look on it favorably...

    For those of you that have already been accepted for IR at LSE, or are already attending: How hard is it to get in? Would writing to some of the professors help me get accepted maybe? How much do the admissions people rely on test grades, and how much on personal statements when making their decision? I've done some research with a federal judge here in the US, some other mentorship/internship/research work, and I took a course on Global ADR at the Central European University (Budapest) last summer. Is this something I should put in my personal statement? (hehe, sorry, I get a little carried away with questions...)
    Aggie, thank you for your information. Glad to hear that LSE is well known among the US law schools. If I plan to pursue postgraduate study in Economics in the US, is an undergraduate degree in IR going to affect my application? I guess a background in Economics at the undergraduate level is a necessary condition for application to higer level learning in Economics in the US.
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    Although not as well-versed in higher ed. and economics, I think you DO have to have some sort of background in math or economy to study it at graduate level. On the other hand, business schools have no such requirements for your background, and if you're interested in IR/economy I would suggest looking into a career of international business. Hope this kinda helps.
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    Hello guofangbu. I'll be at the LSE in 2005 to read International Relations. I deferred for a year because of National Service in my country - Singapore.

    Frankly, I'm very excited just thinking of what's in store. However, reasonably, I have lots of worries as well. Financing my studies is one. But of course, you pay for what you get and I believe an LSE degree is valuable.

    How prepared are IR freshmen? Chris Brown, in "Understanding International Relations", opined that LSE students are the best prepared in the country. I should think they're the best prepared in the world. That is why amidst serving National Service, I've taken to burying myself in books related to International Relations. I sure hope I'm absorbing as much as I'm reading.

    I get even more worried from what I read. Post-positivist thought is quite confusing for me, as it is for quite a number of other people. Being so grounded in reality by everyday experience, post-positivist thought is too abstract for digestion. I might sound paranoid when I say that I'm afraid of dropping out because of work in post-positivist thought in the course but that's just me being very pessimistic. I will work hard at understanding the likes of Critical Theory and Feminist Thought though. From what I read in "Globalization and World Politics", I think the feminists, generally speaking, have a good point. Anyway, that book is fantastic as a primer.

    I'll be glad if any graduates or current IR students could give us some insight to the course and the LSE itself. Thank you!
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    (Original post by CNN Center)
    Hello guofangbu. I'll be at the LSE in 2005 to read International Relations. I deferred for a year because of National Service in my country - Singapore.

    Frankly, I'm very excited just thinking of what's in store. However, reasonably, I have lots of worries as well. Financing my studies is one. But of course, you pay for what you get and I believe an LSE degree is valuable.

    How prepared are IR freshmen? Chris Brown, in "Understanding International Relations", opined that LSE students are the best prepared in the country. I should think they're the best prepared in the world. That is why amidst serving National Service, I've taken to burying myself in books related to International Relations. I sure hope I'm absorbing as much as I'm reading.

    I get even more worried from what I read. Post-positivist thought is quite confusing for me, as it is for quite a number of other people. Being so grounded in reality by everyday experience, post-positivist thought is too abstract for digestion. I might sound paranoid when I say that I'm afraid of dropping out because of work in post-positivist thought in the course but that's just me being very pessimistic. I will work hard at understanding the likes of Critical Theory and Feminist Thought though. From what I read in "Globalization and World Politics", I think the feminists, generally speaking, have a good point. Anyway, that book is fantastic as a primer.

    I'll be glad if any graduates or current IR students could give us some insight to the course and the LSE itself. Thank you!

    heh. holy jesus. i can assure you that 70% (if not more) of people doing the BSc IR graduate without ever having taken a look at post-positivist thought
    from the sound of it you're going to do very well.
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    Thank you for your reply, anonymity. For the money I'm going to have to spend over the three years, I sure hope I will do well.

    How does the International Relations courses across the Atlantic at say, Georgetown or Columbia, compare to that taught at the LSE? In general, which, if any, course is held in higher regard by employers and academics alike? Of course, any comparison will be as problematic as comparing chalk and cheese. However, they are after all International Relations courses so it would be safe to assume that there are sufficient threads for comparison.

    I understand that the International Relations course at Georgetown is more broad-based. Students have to complete modules in religions, literature etc. I don't suppose I'll deal with any modules on English Literature at the LSE. Also, correct me if I'm wrong but Georgetown students spend a greater deal of time learning a foreign language. Indeed, learning a foreign language is central to the course at Georgetown.
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    fuk yank unis. LSE IR is immense, just get disorderly and you'll be fine
 
 
 
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