Sergio000
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Hello.
I am currently in year 11 and am considering computer science as a degree. My parents are doctors, and although they are supportive, I can't help but feel they think computer science is a "second rate" degree. I get good grades in all of my subjects, but I particularly like maths and tried coding and robotics as a hobby when I was younger. Is there any truth that a computer science degree isn't for those who have the grades to get into courses like engineering and medicine, or is that a misconception? If so, why do you think people have this view?
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username2911200
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(Original post by Sergio000)
Is there any truth that a computer science degree isn't for those who have the grades to get into courses like engineering and medicine
No. 'Typical offers require A Level: A*A*A'

http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...mputer-science

That's the same as their standard offer for medicine, and it's higher than most medicine offers in the UK.

'Typical offer Three A-level offer: A*AA'

https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/...cine/medicine/
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DCFCfan4eva
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(Original post by Sergio000)
Hello.
I am currently in year 11 and am considering computer science as a degree. My parents are doctors, and although they are supportive, I can't help but feel they think computer science is a "second rate" degree. I get good grades in all of my subjects, but I particularly like maths and tried coding and robotics as a hobby when I was younger. Is there any truth that a computer science degree isn't for those who have the grades to get into courses like engineering and medicine, or is that a misconception? If so, why do you think people have this view?
I don't study computer science but I don't think it is second rate and I have never met anyone that has. Most people I know seem to think that it is a difficult course and think you have to be intelligent to do it.
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sulaimanali
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there are a lot of degrees that are underrated and do not get the respect they deserve.
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Final Fantasy
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Your parents seem clueless on this sorry... do they think all the NHS systems were built and maintained by magic? No... IT contractors and staff... many of whom probably have computer science degrees and/or certifications.

Medicine and indeed pretty much every other field would not be where it is today without computer science.

It's a highly respected field and very competitive in this digital world we live in now!
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Liam6993
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Might it sometimes be a case of people not knowing what computer science is? There seem to be a lot of people who don't understand the difference between computer science and IT, which I guess could more legitimately be seen as a softer subject. Just speculating, though.
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navip
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I agree with Liam. Most people don't know the difference between CS, SE, and IT/ICT
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flyingpanda
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(Original post by Glassapple)
No. 'Typical offers require A Level: A*A*A'

http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...mputer-science

That's the same as their standard offer for medicine, and it's higher than most medicine offers in the UK.

'Typical offer Three A-level offer: A*AA'

https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/...cine/medicine/
You're comparing Computer Science at Cambridge, to Medicince at Imperial. I don't think that's an apt comparison.

And entry requirements doesn't have much to do with how respected Computer Science is in general.
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username2911200
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(Original post by flyingpanda)
You're comparing Computer Science at Cambridge, to Medicince at Imperial. I don't think that's an apt comparison.

And entry requirements doesn't have much to do with how respected Computer Science is in general.
I was answering the question about whether people who get lower grades go for computer science. I compared two of the best universities in the country and the courses the OP is talking about. I'm not trying to say how respected it is in general, look at the piece of the OP I quoted. Imperial's medicine offer asks for the same grades as its own computer science offer.
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by Sergio000)
I am currently in year 11 and am considering computer science as a degree. My parents are doctors, and although they are supportive, I can't help but feel they think computer science is a "second rate" degree. I get good grades in all of my subjects, but I particularly like maths and tried coding and robotics as a hobby when I was younger. Is there any truth that a computer science degree isn't for those who have the grades to get into courses like engineering and medicine, or is that a misconception? If so, why do you think people have this view?
It gets respect in earnings! As others have said, some courses require very high grades. It's great that you have hobby interest in computing - many don't, despite how accessible it is these days. Have you considered a joint Maths & CS degree?

IMO, CS degrees don't make good developers on their own - it's much more abotu the individual and their drive / ambition. CS is constantly changing, so you need people that relish that. Having said that, a lot of software work doesn't require much in the way of problem solving or algorithms expertise - you can get away with a lot these days.

The reputation issue, IMO, has a lot to do with CS being seen as a meal ticket - there was huge demand with limited supply, so a lot of sub-par candidates got positions. I've interviewed a lot of people who don't even try to show interest or enjoyment of CS, which isn't ideal.
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flyingpanda
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(Original post by Glassapple)
I was answering the question about whether people who get lower grades go for computer science. I compared two of the best universities in the country and the courses the OP is talking about. I'm not trying to say how respected it is in general, look at the piece of the OP I quoted. Imperial's medicine offer asks for the same grades as its own computer science offer.
RIP me for skim reading. I see what you meant now.
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Amefish
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Computer Science is a growing market today and you could be one of the future's innovators! If it's something you're interested in, I encourage you seriously to get involved, you can do amazing things my dad teaches Computer Science level 3 BTEC and lots of his students have gone onto university and are now in really high paying jobs
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navip
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
It gets respect in earnings! As others have said, some courses require very high grades. It's great that you have hobby interest in computing - many don't, despite how accessible it is these days. Have you considered a joint Maths & CS degree?

IMO, CS degrees don't make good developers on their own - it's much more abotu the individual and their drive / ambition. CS is constantly changing, so you need people that relish that. Having said that, a lot of software work doesn't require much in the way of problem solving or algorithms expertise - you can get away with a lot these days.

The reputation issue, IMO, has a lot to do with CS being seen as a meal ticket - there was huge demand with limited supply, so a lot of sub-par candidates got positions. I've interviewed a lot of people who don't even try to show interest or enjoyment of CS, which isn't ideal.
CS is not software engineering. The CS fundamentals don't constantly change as they're universal. However, the technologies change
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by navip)
CS is not software engineering. The CS fundamentals don't constantly change as they're universal. However, the technologies change
True. I used CS as shorthand for CS-based work.
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csillabu
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Personally, as someone finishing an A Level in computer science (and a very keen software developer and encryption hobbyist since year 9), the academics of it have been slaughtered for me by the exam boards, despite my confidence in the subject. It just isn't a real subject to me considering the courses available are so difficult to interpret that programmers, teachers and degree students alike have struggled. It is fun for some, but far too much work in non specialist areas that have to be relearned later.
However, to your parents and anyone else, it takes a lot to get into it for university if you want a good degree from it. You can do a degree without the A level course and most people believe thats the right way to go considering it is very hard to generalise computing in academia.

But that is just my experience, I hope it helps a bit... ><
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JickDee
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It's not as traditional or respected as engineering/medicine/law/maths/economics, mainly because it's a relatively new subject and people don't know or care about the difference between CS and some IT certificate. "What's the difference, it's both just computers right?" Also, a lot of CS degrees in this country are (IMO) not as rigorous/difficult/maths-intensive as related subjects like maths/engineering. In fact, they are more like IT degrees with some programming and maths chucked in. At the better universities, however, it is very difficult and has a lot of discrete maths.

At the end of the day, all "respect" really amounts to is your mum telling your aunt "oh my son's becoming a doctor" and your aunt going "oh that's nice!". Don't spend 30k and 3+ years of your life for that - it's not worth it.

If you were talking about employment, CS is good. Salaries can be low/average or very high, depending on how talented you are and your experience (internships/projects/etc). Top CS grads can earn as much as, if not more than, say, doctors, but average CS grads probably won't. Compared to engineering, salaries are similar.
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anosmianAcrimony
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I've got only the utmost respect for computer scientists. That stuff is difficult.
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Async
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Computer scientists are one of the most respected in this modern era. We're the reason why the digital world is the way it is now, without us, life would be very different. In terms of earnings, oh boy, we earn a LOT.
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username3186268
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
Your parents seem clueless on this sorry... do they think all the NHS systems were built and maintained by magic? No... IT contractors and staff... many of whom probably have computer science degrees and/or certifications.

Medicine and indeed pretty much every other field would not be where it is today without computer science.

It's a highly respected field and very competitive in this digital world we live in now!
If that's your logic then every field is highly respected. Even the ones that don't require degrees. "Without bin-men every where would be dirty and we'd all live short lives and die due to the un sustainability."


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Async
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(Original post by Lmacwilliam)
If that's your logic then every field is highly respected. Even the ones that don't require degrees. "Without bin-men every where would be dirty and we'd all live short lives and die due to the un sustainability."

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Well no, because there isn't a great deal of skill, knowledge or learning required to become a bin man.
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