silentlystudying
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I'm just about to finish my GCSEs (last two tomorrow yay!!) but I was wondering about A-Level options, I want to choose 3 but I spoke to one of my teachers and they advised to do 4, their reason was that when I drop it I'll still have UCAS points from that to bank for university. So I was wondering if ALL universities, look at UCAS points or just grades because on some websites it only talks about the grades you need, not necessarily the points.
Edit: Sorry!! I did mean UCAS points, I got a bit confused
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IWMTom
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Do you mean UCAS points?
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Captain Poldark
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Not all universities, some just look at grades. Only do four subjects if you think that you can handle the workload because its better to do well in three A levels than do badly in four.
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Juno
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(Original post by notgonnasaymisha)
I'm just about to finish my GCSEs (last two tomorrow yay!!) but I was wondering about A-Level options, I want to choose 3 but I spoke to one of my teachers and they advised to do 4, their reason was that when I drop it I'll still have UMS points from that to bank for university. So I was wondering if ALL universities, look at UMS points or just grades because on some websites it only talks about the grades you need, not necessarily the points.
You're saying "UMS points" here, but don't mean that. UMS points are a way of ensuring that grades are standardised across subjects and years - if you get a B one year, the number of UMS marks remains the same, so your grade is the same as someone getting a B in a different year.

Universities look at UCAS points. These are a way of taking all the different qualifications - A Levels, BTECs, horse riding qualifications, music exams etc - and putting a value on each. Unis can then ask for a certain number of UCAS points, and it's an easier way for them to compare candidates. You will get UCAS points from an AS qualification (if you don't continue to A Level) and can use that towards meeting a university offer.
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gdunne42
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(Original post by notgonnasaymisha)
I'm just about to finish my GCSEs (last two tomorrow yay!!) but I was wondering about A-Level options, I want to choose 3 but I spoke to one of my teachers and they advised to do 4, their reason was that when I drop it I'll still have UMS points from that to bank for university. So I was wondering if ALL universities, look at UMS points or just grades because on some websites it only talks about the grades you need, not necessarily the points.
I'm sure you mean UCAS points rather than UMS. Yes, some universities make offers based on the total number of UCAS points your qualifications earn and an AS in a dropped subject would earn some points. Not all make points based offers, many of them will only make an offer based on results from 3 full A levels. The value of a standalone AS will therefore depend on where you intend to apply and what you want to apply for. Starting 4 does at least mean you can drop the one you don't enjoy or regret choosing and still have 3.


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Dysf(x)al
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(Original post by notgonnasaymisha)
I'm just about to finish my GCSEs (last two tomorrow yay!!) but I was wondering about A-Level options, I want to choose 3 but I spoke to one of my teachers and they advised to do 4, their reason was that when I drop it I'll still have UMS points from that to bank for university. So I was wondering if ALL universities, look at UMS points or just grades because on some websites it only talks about the grades you need, not necessarily the points.
What you're talking about is UCAS, not UMS. UCAS points are awarded based on your grades. The more A-levels and AS-levels you do, the more you end up with. Other qualifications like BTECs, diplomas and graded music exams also give points. Some universities require them, but most just do the usual offer of 3 grades. The real reason you should do 4 is so that if one isn't going too well for you, you can drop it and still get the 3 required.

UMS points are to make sure the scores are similar between years and for distinguishing between a high A and a low A. Only the really selective unis (mainly Cambridge) look at these. Doing more subjects won't help your UMS points since they aren't "banked" like UCAS points are.
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silentlystudying
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Your offer for university will be based on 3 A levels - there is generally no advantage doing four, even for most Oxbridge courses. The UMS points are irrelevant if there isn't a qualification behind them.
-ohh okay, thank you, I did mean UCAS points though, sorry
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silentlystudying
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(Original post by IWMTom)
Do you mean UCAS points?
-yeah sorry
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silentlystudying
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(Original post by Captain Poldark)
Not all universities, some just look at grades. Only do four subjects if you think that you can handle the workload because its better to do well in three A levels than do badly in four.
-that's true, thank you
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silentlystudying
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-Yeah sorry, I meant UCAS, I got a bit confused but ohh that makes more sense, thank you
(Original post by Juno)
You're saying "UMS points" here, but don't mean that. UMS points are a way of ensuring that grades are standardised across subjects and years - if you get a B one year, the number of UMS marks remains the same, so your grade is the same as someone getting a B in a different year.

Universities look at UCAS points. These are a way of taking all the different qualifications - A Levels, BTECs, horse riding qualifications, music exams etc - and putting a value on each. Unis can then ask for a certain number of UCAS points, and it's an easier way for them to compare candidates. You will get UCAS points from an AS qualification (if you don't continue to A Level) and can use that towards meeting a university offer.
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silentlystudying
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(Original post by gdunne42)
I'm sure you mean UCAS points rather than UMS. Yes, some universities make offers based on the total number of UCAS points your qualifications earn and an AS in a dropped subject would earn some points. Not all make points based offers, many of them will only make an offer based on results from 3 full A levels. The value of a standalone AS will therefore depend on where you intend to apply and what you want to apply for. Starting 4 does at least mean you can drop the one you don't enjoy or regret choosing and still have 3.


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-I may take the extra one then in case I don't like one of them, thank youu
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silentlystudying
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(Original post by TheMindGarage)
What you're talking about is UCAS, not UMS. UCAS points are awarded based on your grades. The more A-levels and AS-levels you do, the more you end up with. Other qualifications like BTECs, diplomas and graded music exams also give points. Some universities require them, but most just do the usual offer of 3 grades. The real reason you should do 4 is so that if one isn't going too well for you, you can drop it and still get the 3 required.

UMS points are to make sure the scores are similar between years and for distinguishing between a high A and a low A. Only the really selective unis (mainly Cambridge) look at these. Doing more subjects won't help your UMS points since they aren't "banked" like UCAS points are.
-oh okay, thank youu
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