Hating medicine. Want to quit but too far in Watch

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student 12345
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I am a 4th year medical student about to go into my 5th year (in a 6 year program). I have known since my 3rd year that medicine is not for me. When we started going to hospitals and interacting with doctors I realised I hated it. On top of that the I know for a fact i dont have the ability to be a doctor. I have always been practically incompetent and lacking in my ability to work as a team, think on my feet, and lead others. Despite this i have powered through because i kept thinking dropping out would have meant all that hard work and money spent would be for nothing. My reasoning do to medicine was based on my parents pushing me and saying that all other professions struggle to get jobs and that becoming a doctor would mean i would avoid the labour intensive hardship they went through whilst earning a decent paycheck. I am also to blame though, i never really thought about what i wanted to do, I was more concerned with getting good grades than putting effort into exploring and doing work experience to find my passion so after A-levels when the decision came about what to pursue I just went for the option that my parents presented in front of me. Now i dont know what to do. Should i quit with only 2 years left. If i do is it worth doing another degree and trying to find my passion. Something like computer programming could be more suited to my introverted methodical personality. Or should i just continue down the road of medicine knowing i will hate it whilst struggling to perform my job competently. Alternatively should i just finish my degree and have it in my back pocket and then pursue something else. Is a medical degree without a medical licence at all valuable?
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TheIncredibleZ
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You do not have to become a doctor even if you do medicine as a degree(although the majority do) i would say finish the 5 year course and go into whatever you want to do.
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navarre
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Definitely finish the degree. I'm sorry to hear yours is 6 years rather than 5 years (couldn't imagine spending that long studying!), but with the MBBS under your belt, you can go into almost any other field. I would hasten to add that medicine is a diverse profession, with some areas not being as big on leading a team or practical skills as others.
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Do you have your BSc already?
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username3105252
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Get qualified and go down the lab route? Good luck!


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MKaur18
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(Original post by student 12345)
I am a 4th year medical student about to go into my 5th year (in a 6 year program). I have known since my 3rd year that medicine is not for me. When we started going to hospitals and interacting with doctors I realised I hated it. On top of that the I know for a fact i dont have the ability to be a doctor. I have always been practically incompetent and lacking in my ability to work as a team, think on my feet, and lead others. Despite this i have powered through because i kept thinking dropping out would have meant all that hard work and money spent would be for nothing. My reasoning do to medicine was based on my parents pushing me and saying that all other professions struggle to get jobs and that becoming a doctor would mean i would avoid the labour intensive hardship they went through whilst earning a decent paycheck. I am also to blame though, i never really thought about what i wanted to do, I was more concerned with getting good grades than putting effort into exploring and doing work experience to find my passion so after A-levels when the decision came about what to pursue I just went for the option that my parents presented in front of me. Now i dont know what to do. Should i quit with only 2 years left. If i do is it worth doing another degree and trying to find my passion. Something like computer programming could be more suited to my introverted methodical personality. Or should i just continue down the road of medicine knowing i will hate it whilst struggling to perform my job competently. Alternatively should i just finish my degree and have it in my back pocket and then pursue something else. Is a medical degree without a medical licence at all valuable?
You would be wasting your efforts if u quitted now. Finish this untik the 6th year then look in research, lab work even maybe teaching?? good luck..
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passer881
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my advice is to complete your medicine degree. There are a lot of other things that you can do in the future. You don't have to be a doctor if you don't want. You said that you want something like computer programming. Nowadays, IT has become very important in all sectors, including healthcare. Sg is moving towards electronic health records with the aim of having only one record for each patient. At the same time, cybersecurity is a real threat and the healthcare sector definitely needs a lot of computer ppl. You can even be a white hat if you want. I know a few doctors who are doing IT now, 1 of them is even a consultant.

Like what MKaur said, you can also look into research, lab work, etc. I know many doctors who no longer see patients, but managing research projects & writing manuscripts in the office. You can also enter public health. There are many things that you can do (health service research, disease control, etc).

Completing medicine doesn't mean you must be a doctor throughout your life. Jia You!
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With limited information it does seem a shame not to finish your degree. Would you get any qualification if you stop now? Could you transfer to a different related course? I would definitely talk to your uni about this, and your friends. Whatever happens don't be unhappy. Life is too short. Good luck
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Cheetara
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I'm really sorry to hear you're not enjoying medicine. I agree with everyone above. Definitely complete your studies. The way medicine is taught sort of pushes people in the direction of hospital and health service work. This is misleading as there are numerous routes you can take after graduating. You will finish up with what is essentially a very valuable and highly regarded qualification. Use the rest of your time to figure out what you're really passionate about and interested in. Great if that's IT but be wary of making the same mistake of just jumping in to anything without perspective of what's out there. Above all, chin up. Life's an adventure and you learn from everything. You're obviously very intelligent and I'm sure whatever happens, you'll land on your feet. 😉
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student 12345
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Thanks everyone fore the advice, I appreciate it. I study abroad (in the czech republic) so there are different rules, They do not give you a Bsc after 3 years so its either complete the full 6 for a Mbbs or get nothing. I will take everyone's advice and complete the 6 years. As much as I hate studying medicine and the amount of pointless information we must learn on a daily basis it does seem illogical to waste all the time for nothing. However all the options you have suggested for a career outside of clinical practice I assume would require me to be licenced. Would you recommend that after I graduate I complete my FY training even though it would require me to spend another 2 years of my life in the hospital environment which i absolutely hate. Also I am not entirely sure I can even complete my FY training. As mentioned in my previous post I severely lack the skills to be doctor and although these skills might not be needed for certain medical specialities they will be needed for the FY1/2

Does anyone have experience or know anyone who didn't do their FY training and what they went into. I know it would be smart to just push through and get a licence but at this point I am really not sure if i can take it
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(Original post by student 12345)
Thanks everyone fore the advice, I appreciate it. I study abroad (in the czech republic) so there are different rules, They do not give you a Bsc after 3 years so its either complete the full 6 for a Mbbs or get nothing. I will take everyone's advice and complete the 6 years. As much as I hate studying medicine and the amount of pointless information we must learn on a daily basis it does seem illogical to waste all the time for nothing. However all the options you have suggested for a career outside of clinical practice I assume would require me to be licenced. Would you recommend that after I graduate I complete my FY training even though it would require me to spend another 2 years of my life in the hospital environment which i absolutely hate. Also I am not entirely sure I can even complete my FY training. As mentioned in my previous post I severely lack the skills to be doctor and although these skills might not be needed for certain medical specialities they will be needed for the FY1/2

Does anyone have experience or know anyone who didn't do their FY training and what they went into. I know it would be smart to just push through and get a licence but at this point I am really not sure if i can take it
Some thoughts:

Are you sure you'd get no qualification by leaving earlier? Could you switch to another course and graduate earlier, possibly in something more relevant to your interest? It's worth enquiring.

Are you dead set on coming/returning to the UK? The foundation program does not exist in many places and you can go straight to specialising e.g. in lab work. In fact, depending on your course if you did come back to you uk you might only need to do fy2 not both years, but you have probably already looked into that and tbh even 1 year working as a doctor when you don't want to would be hell.

If you left straight out of med school you would not have any advantage in the IT industry no (unlike someone who has actually worked in healthcare). But you would not really be behind either - you have a well respected degree like other job seekers. You'd just have to improve your CV and applying like everyone else.
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Nottie
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(Original post by student 12345)
Thanks everyone fore the advice, I appreciate it. I study abroad (in the czech republic) so there are different rules, They do not give you a Bsc after 3 years so its either complete the full 6 for a Mbbs or get nothing. I will take everyone's advice and complete the 6 years. As much as I hate studying medicine and the amount of pointless information we must learn on a daily basis it does seem illogical to waste all the time for nothing. However all the options you have suggested for a career outside of clinical practice I assume would require me to be licenced. Would you recommend that after I graduate I complete my FY training even though it would require me to spend another 2 years of my life in the hospital environment which i absolutely hate. Also I am not entirely sure I can even complete my FY training. As mentioned in my previous post I severely lack the skills to be doctor and although these skills might not be needed for certain medical specialities they will be needed for the FY1/2

Does anyone have experience or know anyone who didn't do their FY training and what they went into. I know it would be smart to just push through and get a licence but at this point I am really not sure if i can take it
One thing to bear in mind is that medicine in Eastern Europe is much different to medicine in UK.
I don't know what it is exactly that you hate about working in the hospital, but don't rely on your perception of team work, medical students and junior doctors are treated completely different in the UK and in the Eastern Europe.

Second of all, if you complete 6 years course you are allowed to go straight into F2, which I think also means you are fully qualified as a doctor and have your license (aka the GMC number).
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Cheetara
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(Original post by student 12345)
Thanks everyone fore the advice, I appreciate it. I study abroad (in the czech republic) so there are different rules, They do not give you a Bsc after 3 years so its either complete the full 6 for a Mbbs or get nothing. I will take everyone's advice and complete the 6 years. As much as I hate studying medicine and the amount of pointless information we must learn on a daily basis it does seem illogical to waste all the time for nothing. However all the options you have suggested for a career outside of clinical practice I assume would require me to be licenced. Would you recommend that after I graduate I complete my FY training even though it would require me to spend another 2 years of my life in the hospital environment which i absolutely hate. Also I am not entirely sure I can even complete my FY training. As mentioned in my previous post I severely lack the skills to be doctor and although these skills might not be needed for certain medical specialities they will be needed for the FY1/2

Does anyone have experience or know anyone who didn't do their FY training and what they went into. I know it would be smart to just push through and get a licence but at this point I am really not sure if i can take it
So I once worked for a pharma company and met a Medical Advisor there. She graduated but didn't do her foundation training. She said clinical work wasn't for her but she could still offer her medical expertise where needed for clinical trial participants. Just a suggestion.
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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(Original post by student 12345)
Thanks everyone fore the advice, I appreciate it. I study abroad (in the czech republic) so there are different rules, They do not give you a Bsc after 3 years so its either complete the full 6 for a Mbbs or get nothing. I will take everyone's advice and complete the 6 years. As much as I hate studying medicine and the amount of pointless information we must learn on a daily basis it does seem illogical to waste all the time for nothing. However all the options you have suggested for a career outside of clinical practice I assume would require me to be licenced. Would you recommend that after I graduate I complete my FY training even though it would require me to spend another 2 years of my life in the hospital environment which i absolutely hate. Also I am not entirely sure I can even complete my FY training. As mentioned in my previous post I severely lack the skills to be doctor and although these skills might not be needed for certain medical specialities they will be needed for the FY1/2

Does anyone have experience or know anyone who didn't do their FY training and what they went into. I know it would be smart to just push through and get a licence but at this point I am really not sure if i can take it
Hi,

I can hopefully tell you exactly what you need to know, but then. looking at your whole situation, you need to make your own decision.

The reason I say the above is because I was in almost exactly the same boat, except that I enjoyed studying medicine, but was just not good at the practical side of things (just like you), and as a 22 year-old, was not particularly bossy enough to lead people - as an example, I did not like to say "Push, push" to a poor woman in labour, and I reluctantly did my 20 deliveries. In anaesthetics, it took me a while to get to take the lead in intubating the patient and administer the anaesthetic myself. I enjoyed most specialties, and actually won the cardiology prize.

My reason for giving up was different - I had a "Skyfall" (you must have seen the film!! except mine was in real life) - after multiple fractures and being bedridden for a month, then in a wheelchair, then using crutches, etc. I decided to give up medicine.

I regretted the decision initially, but later realised it was for the best. I did a pharmacology degree, and then a masters in computer science (you mentioned you like the idea of coding - OMG, what a small world!).

I suppose I am a perpetual student, and I enjoy it thoroughly, but I also work at the upper end as a postgraduate lecturer and a private tutor in biology, specialising in helping students to gain entry into medicine. I suppose I like variety, so I am a jack of all trades, master of some! (sorry that sounds big-headed). I also train GPs in a medical software package called "Vision" by inps.co.uk.

I have written a couple of medical books, and have worked as a medical adviser for a small pharma firm (after starting off as a medical rep).

So, if you were to ask me my opinion as to the route to take in your situation, and if you can tolerate it, just get your medical degree, and if you do not like clinical work or dealing with patients, do what I did, which is to avoid doing the FY year(s), but you will still have MBBS - you could go into chemical pathology, or join a pharma company.or do a PhD in a BMS subject and then either go into research or academia.

The only difference between us is that you do not enjoy medicine, whereas I enjoyed most specialties. In view of that, the difference in the decision you make, looking at it logically, and if you genuinely feel that these two years you have left would actually be hell, then give up now - happiness and enjoying what you do is the most important thing in life. Also, if you do what you enjoy and excel at it, money follows - that might keep your parents happy, too!

One other possible (50:50 chance I suppose!) is that you might be a girl - (I am a guy!). Without being prejudiced or sexist, if that is the case, you might make a different decision - whatever feminists might say about boys and girls being identical, let us face it: Elton John will NEVER give birth! haha.

If you want a chat to discuss any aspect of my experience further, do PM me.

Thanks,
M
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Mr Optimist
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I would finish your degree. Remember medicine offers such a large option list of what you can with the degree. If you drop out now you may seriously regret it, especially if the other courses you're thinking of doing do not end up offering you the satisfaction you think they will! Don't let some aspects of the medical course ruin the whole experience for you. I would not risk dropping out. When I was studying pharmacy, a 3rd year dentistry student dropped out and came to study pharmacy. After 2 years of pharmacy, he dropped out again. He had serious regrets of dropping out of dental school.
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(Original post by macpatelgh)
One other possible (50:50 chance I suppose!) is that you might be a girl - (I am a guy!). Without being prejudiced or sexist, if that is the case, you might make a different decision - whatever feminists might say about boys and girls being identical, let us face it: Elton John will NEVER give birth! haha.
Out of curiosity, what do you mean by this?
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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(Original post by StationToStation)
Out of curiosity, what do you mean by this?
Hi again StationToStation,

Hope you are well; you will remember our recent dialogue RE: road to research.

Just being careful about what I say regarding the genetically different makeup of males and females, seeing the often misinterpreted meaning of the Sex Discrimination Act and the trend, particularly among feminists, towards mistakenly assuming one is sexist just because of a mention of a minor inevitable difference between the genders.

To put it more bluntly and risking my neck in the paranoid sector of the population, and whether we like it or not, experience shows that, in general [and of course there are exceptions], some women might have a different outlook to careers than men - so my point was that if OP is a girl, then one of the factors that determines the route she takes (ONE OUT OF SEVERAL, may I stress!) might be her gender.
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(Original post by macpatelgh)
Hi again StationToStation,

Hope you are well; you will remember our recent dialogue RE: road to research.

Just being careful about what I say regarding the genetically different makeup of males and females, seeing the often misinterpreted meaning of the Sex Discrimination Act and the trend, particularly among feminists, towards mistakenly assuming one is sexist just because of a mention of a minor inevitable difference between the genders.

To put it more bluntly and risking my neck in the paranoid sector of the population, and whether we like it or not, experience shows that, in general [and of course there are exceptions], some women might have a different outlook to careers than men - so my point was that if OP is a girl, then one of the factors that determines the route she takes (ONE OUT OF SEVERAL, may I stress!) might be her gender.
I agree that women are different than men (obviously).

It’s also pretty obvious that they tend to gravitate towards different career paths. But I think these differences are to a large extent, and should be about, the differences in temperament i.e. women e.g. being on average more agreeable than men and more interested in people than things/ideas.

I also think that the problem of combining family and career is on average a more complex one for women, due to things like the cultural and biological predisposition of women to be the ones who mainly take care of kids. But I see no reason why this problem couldn’t and shouldn’t be solved if that’s what you want - plenty of women manage this beautifully. And even if your family is the most important thing in your life that doesn’t mean that you career can’t be important to you as well.

So tbh I see no reason why women should actively consider their gender when choosing a career instead of just following the things that they as individuals find enjoyable and important and are good at, just like men.
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Cheetara
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Hi

I hope this isn't too far off topic. I was just wondering, for those of you who have or are studying medicine, are there personality traits that you think wouldn't quite make the cut? I've had many doctor friends who are mostly very "type A". Do you think being a bit of a shrinking violet would put you at a disadvantage to pursue medicine? I noticed someone mentioned they weren't very forthcoming in certain scenarios, so do you think this is an essential disposition of a doctor? Some people are more thinkers than they are vocally expressive and I wondered how that would play out in say, PBL or just day to day hospital work.
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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(Original post by StationToStation)
I agree that women are different than men (obviously).

It’s also pretty obvious that they tend to gravitate towards different career paths. But I think these differences are to a large extent, and should be about, the differences in temperament i.e. women e.g. being on average more agreeable than men and more interested in people than things/ideas.

I also think that the problem of combining family and career is on average a more complex one for women, due to things like the cultural and biological predisposition of women to be the ones who mainly take care of kids. But I see no reason why this problem couldn’t and shouldn’t be solved if that’s what you want - plenty of women manage this beautifully. And even if your family is the most important thing in your life that doesn’t mean that you career can’t be important to you as well.

So tbh I see no reason why women should actively consider their gender when choosing a career instead of just following the things that they as individuals find enjoyable and important and are good at, just like men.
Could not agree more, boss; in stating my opinions, perhaps I am too literal and scientific, and do not convey what I am actually trying to say - I concur with you absolutely in that women are forced by circumstances/biased views of some men, (and I did not mean to say at all that their paths should be modified intentionally out of consideration of gender differences) and the points you have raised to make slightly different choices in life, but at the same time, when feminists (out of envity of normal women perhaps) try to make puppets of their partners or other men, that equates to the converse of the attitudes of some men mentioned above, and in my view should be discouraged in line with the said converse.

Thank you for correcting my deficiency in the less tangible/more abstract aspects of the English language.
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