What exactly is the difference between UTS and breaking stress? Watch

BurdMan
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#1
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"UTS is the maximum stress a material can withstand"

"At breaking stress, the material breaks"

From looking at a graph of it, I can only assume that the breaking stress is actually more of a breaking strain? And once you reach the UTS the material will just continue to extend and break even without further load,similar to a yield point?
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Smack
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(Original post by BurdMan)
"UTS is the maximum stress a material can withstand"

"At breaking stress, the material breaks"

From looking at a graph of it, I can only assume that the breaking stress is actually more of a breaking strain? And once you reach the UTS the material will just continue to extend and break even without further load,similar to a yield point?
Could you post this graph? "Breaking stress" isn't a term I have heard much of, although Corrosionpedia has an entry under it.
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trapking
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(Original post by BurdMan)
"UTS is the maximum stress a material can withstand"

"At breaking stress, the material breaks"

From looking at a graph of it, I can only assume that the breaking stress is actually more of a breaking strain? And once you reach the UTS the material will just continue to extend and break even without further load,similar to a yield point?
Simple:

The UTS is the maximum stress the material can take and the Breaking Stress is the result of yielding the material to the point where all its fibres break then the material "breaks" or fails.
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BurdMan
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(Original post by Smack)
Could you post this graph? "Breaking stress" isn't a term I have heard much of, although Corrosionpedia has an entry under it.
Similar to this but it says breaking stress where it says fracture.
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BurdMan
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(Original post by trapking)
Simple:

The UTS is the maximum stress the material can take and the Breaking Stress is the result of yielding the material to the point where all its fibres break then the material "breaks" or fails.
So I was right? or am I still misunderstanding?
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trapking
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(Original post by BurdMan)
So I was right? or am I still misunderstanding?
You're correct, yes.
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BurdMan
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(Original post by trapking)
You're correct, yes.
Ayyy

Thanks for the help!
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pleasedtobeatyou
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(Original post by BurdMan)
Ayyy

Thanks for the help!
Just a small point to make.

For most engineering structures, they are designed against their yield strength. As a result, designing for the ultimate stress is less common and the "breaking stress" is hence even less common which is why the previous posters may have found difficulty finding literature about it.
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Smack
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(Original post by BurdMan)
Similar to this but it says breaking stress where it says fracture.
Okay, "breaking stress" is what is more commonly known as fracture, i.e. the point at which the material actually fractures.
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