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    If you had to choose between UCLs Politics, Sociology and Eastern European Studies BA

    or KCLs European Politics BA which would you pick?
    I hear that one of the only areas KCL actually edges UCL is in their politics departments.

    Also would both degrees other significant transferable skills in order to become a trainee solicitor or to get a job in finance or postgrad.

    Cheers
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    (Original post by WrongDong)
    If you had to choose between UCLs Politics, Sociology and Eastern European Studies BA

    or KCLs European Politics BA which would you pick?
    I hear that one of the only areas KCL actually edges UCL is in their politics departments.

    Also would both degrees other significant transferable skills in order to become a trainee solicitor or to get a job in finance or postgrad.

    Cheers
    I don't think you can really compare KCL's European Politics degree with UCL's Politics, Sociology and Eastern European Studies degree; they focus on two completely different areas. Note that the UCL degree is not based at UCL's politics department, it is based at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES), which is a world leader in the study of the region.

    The real question is, what aspect of politics are you interested in? If you are interested in Central/Eastern Europe and Russia then UCL is hard to beat, if you are interested in EU politics then obviously the KCL degree is the better choice. Is there a reason you're not considering UCL's European Social and Political Studies degree?
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    I've been to UCL and Kings and I can say unequivocally Kings for politics
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    I've heard...very few good things...about SSEES. On the other hand KCL's Politics and Political Economy department is very well regarded domestically and internationally the uni as a whole is about as recognised as UCL. I think KCL has slightly better ERASMUS+ and similar study abroad options as well, if that's of interest (albeit, this likely varies on course so many not be true for Politics/SSEES).

    However if your interest is in Eastern European politics (and possibly languages) then SSEES is obviously the clear choice. However I've seen comments that the retention rate and diversity of the programmes there are both rather poor. Naturally people are more likely to post criticisms than compliments online so, take it with a pinch of salt.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I don't think you can really compare KCL's European Politics degree with UCL's Politics, Sociology and Eastern European Studies degree; they focus on two completely different areas. Note that the UCL degree is not based at UCL's politics department, it is based at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES), which is a world leader in the study of the region.

    The real question is, what aspect of politics are you interested in? If you are interested in Central/Eastern Europe and Russia then UCL is hard to beat, if you are interested in EU politics then obviously the KCL degree is the better choice. Is there a reason you're not considering UCL's European Social and Political Studies degree?
    I am extremely interested in both areas of politics.

    I was looking at the ESPS dual degree at UCL but the acceptance rate is hideously low, it has very high grade requirements and has low graduate pay.

    I have visited UCL and know its at SEESS. I really like it and the lecturers seem to be world leaders in what they do. My only problem it is I am quite worried its not going to be diverse like the rest of the Uni and instead be full of Eastern europeans. Nothing wrong with this but I would prefer a more diverse environemnt which is part of the reason london appeals to me.

    Another area that worries me is what degree will be more respected by employers regarding universities. UCLs degree sounds a bit wishy washy to me whilst KCLs degree semms like a more well rounded and respectable.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    I've heard...very few good things...about SSEES.
    Er... really? I've heard nothing but great things.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    I've heard...very few good things...about SSEES. On the other hand KCL's Politics and Political Economy department is very well regarded domestically and internationally the uni as a whole is about as recognised as UCL. I think KCL has slightly better ERASMUS+ and similar study abroad options as well, if that's of interest (albeit, this likely varies on course so many not be true for Politics/SSEES).

    However if your interest is in Eastern European politics (and possibly languages) then SSEES is obviously the clear choice. However I've seen comments that the retention rate and diversity of the programmes there are both rather poor. Naturally people are more likely to post criticisms than compliments online so, take it with a pinch of salt.
    I have heard similar things about SEESS. People have also said its a bit isolated on the campus so is hard to meet other people. However, I have not been able to find anyone on TSR or online who takes EU politics at KCL. And similarly cant found out if any modules are taught by the political economy department or the war studies department which would honestly make me choose KCL in a heartbeat.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Er... really? I've heard nothing but great things.
    Specifically I've seen a few comments that a lot of students transfer out of the courses in the first year to other departments (although that doesn't necessarily mean it's bad, they could just be using an "easier" entry course to backdoor into other more competitive ones) and that the student body is fairly homogeneous and composed primarily of students from the Eastern European countries it studies; again, not necessarily a bad thing, if the languages, culture, politics and history of these countries are of interest.

    Like I said, something to take with a pinch of salt but, if OP is interested in politics generally and doesn't have a specific and enduring interest in the Eastern European and former Soviet countries, they may dislike the program. Which may in part also explain the former statement, as it may simply be people apply thinking it's a more general politics (or history or economics or whatever; they have a bunch of different courses in these areas) course and realise that it's fairly specifically focused on that region.
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    (Original post by WrongDong)
    I was looking at the ESPS dual degree at UCL but the acceptance rate is hideously low, it has very high grade requirements and has low graduate pay.

    I have visited UCL and know its at SEESS. I really like it and the lecturers seem to be world leaders in what they do. My only problem it is I am quite worried its not going to be diverse like the rest of the Uni and instead be full of Eastern europeans. Nothing wrong with this but I would prefer a more diverse environemnt which is part of the reason london appeals to me.

    Another area that worries me is what degree will be more respected by employers regarding universities. UCLs degree sounds a bit wishy washy to me whilst KCLs degree semms like a more well rounded and respectable.
    There are two different ESPS degrees, the older and more established one is the non dual degree, but both are very good, they're probably UCL's most employable degrees - I would not worry about graduate pay, to be honest.

    It's true that there are a fair number of East Europeans at SSEES (personally I think this is a good thing), but there are a lot of UK students too. Despite what you may have heard, it isn't isolated - SSEES students are fully integrated into UCL and it is easy to meet students from other departments. I suggest you join a few SSEES Facebook groups and ask current students what studying there is like before you write it off.

    As for the degree name, I guess that's up to you - personally I don't think it matters but if it makes you uneasy then go for KCL!
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    (Original post by WrongDong)
    I have heard similar things about SEESS. People have also said its a bit isolated on the campus so is hard to meet other people. However, I have not been able to find anyone on TSR or online who takes EU politics at KCL. And similarly cant found out if any modules are taught by the political economy department or the war studies department which would honestly make me choose KCL in a heartbeat.
    Hmm, you make a good point; it looks as though the programme is actually based in the European & International Studies department, and borrows some of the core modules from the Political Economy department. However it also seems to have a gread deal of flexibility in optional module choice as long as they relate to european politics so there may well be an opportunity to take modules from Politics/Political Economy.

    But the salient point being I suppose that we can't even compare the department of Political Economy as the primary factor then. In which case...it depends on OPs interest. If they are very interested in Eastern Europe and former Soviety countries then the SEESS course will be more relevant. If not, then KCL's one probably.

    I might have suggested considering other courses such as PPE, Political Economy, or Politics at KCL, and various at UCL though really...these two both seem quite niche and a little mishmashed on further inspection. In general terms for going on to finance and related areas, both unis are target universities so I can't see much problem there outside of not being in a quantitative course.

    As for training contracts, this is likely to be irrelevant as the Solicitors Regulation Authority are looking at eliminating the TC/LPC (and where applicable, GDL) route in favour of an extensive examination open to graduates of any discipline. In which case it doesn't really matter what you've studied, as long as you develop the skills to study even more for the big law exam

    But in general yes, KCL politics (as in the political economy department) is highly regarded, probably more than UCL.
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    I've done my Master's at SSEES in 2015/16. To dispel a few myths and confirm what Snufkin said:

    -To say that the School is isolated from the rest of the campus is inapplicable. It's right next to the anthropology department, and literally 30 secs away from the main campus. I would say the Bartlett or UCL East are isolated in the proper sense of the word.

    -I went to a top ten UK uni for my BA and I can vouch for SSEES's quality of teaching, which I found equal or superior. Also the class sizes were much smaller, but that might have been a postgrad thing. I found that the focus was more on seminar interaction than lectures, although some seminars were structured as lectures.

    -SSEES's student body is diverse; I only had one East European in my class, four Brits, one Frenchwoman and an Italian.

    At the end of the day, if you're interested in the East European and Russian regions, then go for SSEES. If not, then KCL. Bear in mind that SSEES actually started its life as part of KCL, so go figure.
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    (Original post by Kayel)
    I've done my Master's at SSEES in 2015/16. To dispel a few myths and confirm what Snufkin said:

    -To say that the School is isolated from the rest of the campus is inapplicable. It's right next to the anthropology department, and literally 30 secs away from the main campus. I would say the Bartlett or UCL East are isolated in the proper sense of the word.

    -I went to a top ten UK uni for my BA and I can vouch for SSEES's quality of teaching, which I found equal or superior. Also the class sizes were much smaller, but that might have been a postgrad thing. I found that the focus was more on seminar interaction than lectures, although some seminars were structured as lectures.

    -SSEES's student body is diverse; I only had one East European in my class, four Brits, one Frenchwoman and an Italian.

    At the end of the day, if you're interested in the East European and Russian regions, then go for SSEES. If not, then KCL. Bear in mind that SSEES actually started its life as part of KCL, so go figure.
    Hello, I've been on this thread reading about potential masters courses. Can I ask what your MA course was titled?
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