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    Hi, I was wondering whether or not it would be a good idea to not do any stats modules in my maths degree. I'm not very good at stats as I have trouble sometimes with the conceptual part of it. I'm not sure which job I want to do later on and so I wanted to know whether or not employers want maths students to have done stats modules as part of their degree. I also don't know whether or not there is a point to doing the MMath course (I'm at Warwick) if I'm not going to go into research (very likely I won't be). Do employers value the MMath? The 4th year does look very interesting and there are a lot of modules that I would love to do but not sure if it's worth the price. I have just finished my first year and will be getting results soon so it may be a bit early to think about this but I'd rather think about it sooner rather than later.

    P.S. I realise I made a typo in the title but don't know how to edit it.
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    Consider it this way: the MMath year is cheaper than a standalone masters, and you cover similar coursework in it. You won't do as much in depth research but this isn't really as relevant for working in industry anyway. It also gives you an extra summer to do internships/placements and an extra year to research interesting roles and grad schemes to apply to. Also while there is some discussion about tuition loan rates and so on, at present the SFE loans are one of the lowest interest loans you will ever get in your life. Balanced against even just the POTENTIAL earnings boost from the extra year, it's almost certainly worth it in the long run. Worst case scenario, you lose a year of your maximum salary later in your career and instead lose the tuition and maintenance amount for the year and a small amount of interest accrued. In the long run, this is negligible

    Regarding stats, I'd be surprised if you were allowed to not take any stats modules; I think the IMA requires an introductory prob/stat course for accreditation purposes. Taking stats beyond an introductory course isn't necessary if you aren't interested in it, although depending on your career goals may be helpful. Statistical methods type courses (i.e. not focusing on the actual theory) may be useful if you are considering going into quantitative finance type roles. Probability/measure theory/distribution theory, which goes beyond intro prob/stat, can be useful for more advanced areas of applied maths (particularly thermofluid mechanics and theoretical physics), although they aren't required by any means. Also for I doubt you'll use measure theory if you don't pursue a doctorate anyway
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Consider it this way: the MMath year is cheaper than a standalone masters, and you cover similar coursework in it. You won't do as much in depth research but this isn't really as relevant for working in industry anyway. It also gives you an extra summer to do internships/placements and an extra year to research interesting roles and grad schemes to apply to. Also while there is some discussion about tuition loan rates and so on, at present the SFE loans are one of the lowest interest loans you will ever get in your life. Balanced against even just the POTENTIAL earnings boost from the extra year, it's almost certainly worth it in the long run. Worst case scenario, you lose a year of your maximum salary later in your career and instead lose the tuition and maintenance amount for the year and a small amount of interest accrued. In the long run, this is negligible

    Regarding stats, I'd be surprised if you were allowed to not take any stats modules; I think the IMA requires an introductory prob/stat course for accreditation purposes. Taking stats beyond an introductory course isn't necessary if you aren't interested in it, although depending on your career goals may be helpful. Statistical methods type courses (i.e. not focusing on the actual theory) may be useful if you are considering going into quantitative finance type roles. Probability/measure theory/distribution theory, which goes beyond intro prob/stat, can be useful for more advanced areas of applied maths (particularly thermofluid mechanics and theoretical physics), although they aren't required by any means. Also for I doubt you'll use measure theory if you don't pursue a doctorate anyway
    Thank you for the very informative reply! I will probably talk about the stats component with my personal tutor when I next see him. Statitiscal methods seems like a good 'compromise'. I find the theory a lot harder to understand than the application of it (could be because I didn't devote enough time to the theory to properly learn it). Also its application, as you said, seems like it'll probably help with the most likely career path I will follow (finance). As for the MMath course I think you've convinced me to stay on it that is if I get the necessary grades. I did some more research after your reply and seems like it will pay off in the end like you said. Thanks again
 
 
 
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