Best cooking oils

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Arran90
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Customers are spoilt for choice when it comes to cooking oils in supermarkets with nearly 20 different varieties to choose from.

What do you think the best oils are for particular purposes?

Has anybody successfully made cakes using liquid oils?
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username612415
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Olive oil and rapeseed oil for light sauteing and general frying over low heat. People need to stop cooking with extra virgin olive oil though, 99% of the time it has no benefits as a cooking ingredient over standard olive oil and in fact has a lower smoking point, and the whole point of the virgin press is the superior flavour for use as an ingredient in of itself.

Olive oil, extra virgin olive oil and rapeseed oil all have their place in dressings and sauces, depending on the flavour profile needed. Rapeseed in my favourite for mayonnaise, for example.

I pretty much use sunflower oil and vegetable oil interchangeably as flavour-neutral, high temperature, all-purpose cooking oils. Both can be used in just about any application, are dirt cheap, and will get about as hot as you need them to.

Animal fats are the best for processes why you want to get flavour into the food, for example in confiting,deep frying and roasting.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Arran90)
Customers are spoilt for choice when it comes to cooking oils in supermarkets with nearly 20 different varieties to choose from.

What do you think the best oils are for particular purposes?

Has anybody successfully made cakes using liquid oils?
For perfect roast/Hasselback potatoes, you can't beat goose fat (or duck fat is passable substitute).

For general cooking, a high-quality, cold-pressed rapeseed oil is ideal - it's a neutral flavour and can reach a high temperature before smoking. Olive oil is useful for adding flavour where the dish calls for it, but is unsuitable for frying.
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Arran90
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Many chip shops use Frymax which is made from palm oil. It is solid at room temperature and quite high in saturated fats although less than beef dripping.

Has anybody ever used corn oil?

Are solid vegetable fats like Trex or Cookeen better for shallow frying than liquid oils?
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