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    I have recently become interested in science,biology in paticular I'm 19 years old and wasn't interested when I was in school. I'm now studying biology in my own time researching on the internet, reading at the library etc however I want to further the study and study what a university student would so was curious what textbook to buy. I have seen that biology by Campbell and Reece is standard for an undergraduate however should I first cover GCSE and A level biology before or will this all be included at undergraduate level?
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    (Original post by Sam brimble)
    I have recently become interested in science,biology in paticular I'm 19 years old and wasn't interested when I was in school. I'm now studying biology in my own time researching on the internet, reading at the library etc however I want to further the study and study what a university student would do was curious what textbook to buy. I have seen that biology by Campbell and Reece is standard for an undergraduate however should I first cover GCSE and A level biology before or will this all be included at undergraduate level?
    Campbell is a great textbook but it may be hard to understand without some sort of biology background. Definitely go over GCSE stuff first. Campbell should be fine after that.

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    Thanks a lot; what about the A level stuff? Will that be covered in the Campbell textbook?
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    As you know, at undergraduate level, you would also have a range of heavyweight specialist texts to use - biochemistry, cell biology, invertebrate/vertebrate zoology, genetics etc - plus papers published in peer reviewed journals - when writing essays or in tutorials etc. But these are generally dry, heavyweight that need real commitment to wade through.

    Depending on why you are doing this(!), I'm going to suggest a couple of recent popular science books that are written for the intelligent layperson, but include material that would takes you close to current undergraduate level discussions. Even if they are a bit advanced for your current level, you might find them fun to dip into:
    Neil Shubin "Your Inner Fish"
    Nick Lane "Power, Sex, Suicide"
    Sean Carroll "Endless Forms Most Beautiful"
    Frans de Waal "Are We Smart Enough To Know How Smart Animals Are?"

    And if you are really serious, my daughter wished she had read Dawkins' 600 page epic on evolution "The Ancestor's Tale" before starting her degree.
 
 
 
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